Military strategy

Edward III counting the dead after the battle of Crécy. (Wikimedia Commons)

Moral Repugnance: A Response to ‘Can’t Kill Enough to Win? Think Again’

There are multiple ways to describe retired Lt. Cols. David Bolgiano and John Taylor’s article in the December issue of Proceedings.

The nuclear football. (Wikimedia Commons)

It Is High Time to Do Away With the President’s Nuclear ‘Football’

The recent Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on nuclear weapons introduced some unsettling possibilities.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, U.S. President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during the South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Manila on Nov. 13. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Australia Is Worried About America’s Ability to Lead

The West needs a strong, committed, engaged White House to hedge against China’s inexorable rise.

North Korean soldiers during a parade in Pyongyang on Oct. 10. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

China Should Send 30,000 Troops Into North Korea

The only way to stand down from a nuclear confrontation is to reassure Kim Jong Un that the United States won’t — and can’t — invade.

The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster, 15 May 1648. (Rijksmuseum Amsterdam via Wikimedia Commons)

Edgar on Strategy (Part X): Build your approach on the understanding that the global state system is here to stay

While some arguments for the decline of the state are insightful and important, none of them have stuck.

A U.S. Marine stands guard Apr. 14, 1993 from his position on an armored personnel carrier at a check-point in Mogadishu. (Eric Cabanis/AFP/GettyImages)

Edgar on Strategy (Part IX): To what end? The frequently missing ‘why’ of strategy

Policymakers must articulate the “why” informing a strategy and periodically revaluate whether it is achievable and what ought to come next.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover