natural gas

Finnish President Sauli Niinisto welcomes Russian President Vladimir Putin

Our Top Weekend Reads

Finland’s president carves a diplomatic niche, the coronavirus pandemic sounds alarm bells about genetic engineering, and Donald Trump seeks to actualize his dictatorial dreams.

This pictures shows the Yavuz drillship seen from the Karpaz coast of the northern part of Cyprus, the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) close to Apostolos Andreas monastery on July 21, 2019.

No Gas, No War in the Mediterranean

Border tensions among Turkey, Greece, and Cyprus are about to boil over—but there’s a simple solution.

The Pioneering Spirit vessel, which will carry out construction of the offshore section of the Turkish Stream natural gas pipeline, passes the Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge on the Bosporus in Istanbul on May 31, 2017.

Turkey’s Plans to Become a Regional Energy Giant Just Got a Boost

After the discovery of a large natural gas field, Ankara may have Moscow on the ropes.

A man wearing a hard hat walks by the central facility where the Nord Stream Baltic Sea gas pipeline reaches Western Europe in Lubmin, Germany, on Nov. 8, 2011.

Putin’s Folly

Pompeo may be in an uproar over Russia’s Nord Stream 2 pipeline, but it is hardly the geopolitical masterstroke he imagines.

Protesters man a barricade in support of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs and the Tyendinaga Mohawks

The Pandemic Is Slicing Away Indigenous Sovereignty in Canada

The Wet’suwet’en ended pipeline protests for safety’s sake, but the police aren’t following the rules.

A worker walks in front of pipes stacked at the Nord Stream 2 facility in Sassnitz, Germany, on Oct. 19, 2017.

With Gazprom’s Nord Stream 2, Putin Is Getting Ready to Put the Screws on Europe

The new pipeline won’t deliver energy security. It will make the EU more dependent on a capricious Russia.

An employee of GASCADE Gastransport GmbH walks among sections of steel pipe stacked ahead of construction of the Eugal natural gas pipeline at Rietzneuendorf-Staakow on August 29, 2018 near Golssen, Germany.

Maximum Pressure on Germany Is a Big Mistake

New sanctions from the United States risk pushing Berlin firmly into Moscow’s geopolitical corner.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the inauguration of the newly-arrived foundation platform for the Leviathan natural gas field in the Mediterranean Sea on Jan. 31.

Israeli Energy Exports Won’t Make Europe More Pro-Israel

The natural gas discovered in the Eastern Mediterranean is so expensive to bring to market that it might never reach European consumers, let alone change the policies of EU governments.

British soldiers on a Mark IV tank in 1918.

Today’s Environmental Crisis Was Created in 1919

The Paris Peace Conference set the stage for our oil-soaked global society.

Israel's Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz (L) speaks as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) and Noble Energy's Vice President for Major Projects George Hatfield (R) stand by during the inauguration of the newly-arrived foundation platform for the Leviathan natural gas field in the Mediterranean Sea, about 80 miles west of the Israeli city of Haifa, on January 31.

Will an Israeli Energy Boom Make the EU Pro-Israel?

Future dependency on Israeli natural gas could change the political equation for many European countries that are currently critical of Israeli policies toward Palestinians.

A gas flare from an oil well is seen near Williston, North Dakota, on Sept. 6, 2016.

The United States’ Gas Flare-Up

Why an environmental and economic problem that was on the decline is back with a vengeance.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, attend a ceremony marking the completion of the sea part of the TurkStream gas pipeline in Istanbul on Nov. 19, 2018. (Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s Gas Web Ensnares Europe

New pipeline projects throughout the Middle East could boost Russian influence there while also ensuring the country’s role as the prime supplier of energy to Europe.

A construction worker works on the TurkStream pipeline in the Black Sea on June 23, 2017. (TurkStream Project/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Russia’s Pipe Dreams Are Europe’s Nightmare

Putin’s plans to run the TurkStream pipeline through the Balkans won’t end well.

Iranian protesters carry placards that mock U.S. President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia’s King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman during a demonstration outside the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran on Nov. 4. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Iran Sanctions Could Work

In the medium term, they’ll make it hard for the country to keep up oil production, satisfy domestic demand, and fund the government.

A gas flare burns on Norway's Sleipner gas platform on May 15, 2008. (Daniel Sannum-Lauten/AFP/Getty Images)

Norway’s Green Delusions

The country may seem a haven for clean energy, but that’s because it exports its pollution.

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant on Aug. 21, 2010. (IIPA via Getty Images)

In the Middle East, Soon Everyone Will Want the Bomb

The region is at risk of a nuclear arms race. Washington needs to stop proliferation before it starts.

Vladimir Putin signs a natural gas pipeline in the Russian Far East city of Vladivostok on September 8, 2011. (DMITRY ASTAKHOV/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trojan Horse of Russian Gas

Energy resources aren’t just a commodity – they’re a vehicle for Russia’s political ambitions.

Workers building pipes in the production hall at the Nord Stream 2 facility at Mukran on Ruegen Islandon  in Sassnitz, Germany on Oct. 19, 2017. (Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

What’s Good for Russian Gas Is Good for America

Washington's opposition to a gas pipeline connecting Russia and Germany has never made sense.

The view from Lelu Island toward Kitson Island and the Pacific Ocean in July 2017.

Fantasy Island

Exporting British Columbia’s abundant energy resources should have been a slam dunk. How did a multibillion-dollar dream go up in smoke?

Russian army officers train Syrian army soldiers at their military camp known as the International Demining Center in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra on May 5, 2016. / AFP / VASILY MAXIMOV        (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia Looks to U.N. to Help It Profit From Syria Conquests

Critics suspect the Kremlin is looking to the West to pay the price to make Palmyra safe for Russian business.