North Korea

Police officers charge toward protesters during a demonstration on June 12 in Hong Kong.

What’s Next for Hong Kong?

Plus: U.S. lawmakers push back against Saudi arms sales, Shinzo Abe visits Iran, and the other stories we're following today.

People cross from Guatemala to Mexico at the Talisman bridge in Chiapas State, Mexico, on June 7.

Mexico’s Other Border

Plus: Observers fear spiraling violence in Sudan, a scandal erupts in Brazil, and the other stories we're following today.

A Sudanese protester outside Khartoum's army headquarters on June 3, 2019.

What’s Next for Sudan?

Plus: Mexico continues talks at the White House, elections in Denmark, and the other stories we're following today.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain's Queen Elizabeth II inspect a Guard of Honor at Windsor Castle on July 13, 2018.

Trump Arrives in London

Plus: Mexico prepares to meet U.S. officials over trade, a threat to Merkel's ruling coalition, and what to watch in the world this week.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sit with their respective delegations for the U.S.-North Korea summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018.

Did Kim Jong Un Actually Execute His Nuclear Negotiators?

North Korea experts urge caution over the revelation, noting that previous reports of summary executions proved false.

Investors watch market figures in Nanjing, China, at a stock exchange hall on May 20.

Fear of Prolonged U.S.-China Trade War Rattles Markets

Some financial analysts warned that if trade talks between the countries collapse—and tariffs remain high—the global economy could move toward recession.

Sudanese protesters wave flags during a sit-in outside military headquarters in Khartoum on May 15.

Sudan’s Transition Talks Suspended

The transition in Sudan is put on hold amid violence, Europe balks at the U.S. military response to Iran, and the United States hits Chinese firm Huawei with sanctions.

U.S. President Donald Trump in the Oval Office in Washington on July 30, 2018.

Trump Deserves More Credit for His Foreign Policies

Obscured by chaos and dysfunction, the White House is pursuing approaches that are better than they seem.

Russian President Vladimir Putin welcomes North Korean leader Kim Jong Un prior to their talks at the Far Eastern Federal University campus on Russky Island in Vladivostok, Russia, on April 25.

What Putin Said to Kim

A transcript of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s remarks about his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a joint press conference with his Turkish counterpart at the Kremlin in Moscow on April 8. (Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images)

With Trump’s Talks Faltering, Putin Wants In on the North Korea Game

Meeting Kim Jong Un may be the Russian leader’s latest effort to undermine the Americans.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in talks on the phone with U.S. President Donald Trump at the presidential Blue House on February 28, 2019 in Seoul. (Photo by South Korean Presidential Blue House via Getty Images)

Moon Jae-in Is the Grown-Up at the Table

Stuck between Trump and Kim, the South Korean president is still showing the way forward.

Art depicting North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump is on display at local stores during their summit in Hanoi on Feb. 28. (Linh Pham/Getty Images)

Trump and Kim Need to Go Small

Hanoi flopped because of unrealistic expectations.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un hold a bilateral meeting during the second U.S.-North Korea summit in Hanoi on Feb. 28. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Offers Clumsy Olive Branch to North Korea

Experts say the U.S. president seems desperate to rescue his promise of a nuclear deal.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walks with U.S. President Donald Trump in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Personal. It’s Just Diplomacy.

North Korea is trying to make the nuclear talks all about Trump and Kim. But history shows that professionals must lay the groundwork first.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a news conference following his second summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi on Feb. 28. (Tuan Mark/Getty Images)

Trump Doesn’t Deserve Any Credit for His Disruptive Foreign Policy

There’s no substance behind arguments that the U.S. president is using his unpredictability to the country’s advantage.

U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (L) sit during their second summit meeting at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel on February 28, 2019 in Hanoi, Vietnam.  (Photo by Vietnam News Agency/Handout/Getty Images)

Everything Should Be on the Table in Korea

Failure in Hanoi reinforces the need for bolder future commitments to peace.

U.S. President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable discussion at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Targeting Center in Sterling, Virginia, on Feb. 2, 2018. (Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)

Maximum Pressure Yields Minimum Results

Trump’s favorite foreign-policy doctrine has failed.

South Korean television shows footage of the public demolition of a North Korean cooling tower at the Yongbyon nuclear complex on June 27, 2008. (JUNG Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images)

The Push for a Trump-Kim Nuke Deal Is Far From Over

When it comes to an agreement between Washington and Pyongyang, doing it right beats doing it fast.

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