nuclear weapons

North Korea Missile Test

Why North Korea Needs Its Nukes

Washington speaks of deterrence when it comes to Pyongyang, but Kim would never strike unless attacked first.

U.S. President Donald Trump and National Security Advisor John Bolton during a news conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, on July 12, 2018.

Forget the Book. Bolton’s Legacy Is a Nuclear Arms Race.

Why Bolton will be one of the most negative influences on U.S. security policy for decades to come.

China's President Xi Jinping (L) and US President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.

Trump Fixates on China as Nuclear Arms Pact Nears Expiration

The administration insists any future START treaty has to include Beijing as well as Moscow, but experts say there is almost no chance China will agree.

U.S. President Donald Trump signs new sanctions on Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, at the White House in Washington, DC, on  June 24, 2019.

If Trump Hates Obama’s Nuclear Deal, Why Is He Letting Up on Iran?

Iran is stockpiling enriched uranium and may soon receive advanced weapons from Russia. Trump has an easy way to tighten the screws.

China's DF-41 nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missiles at a military parade on Tiananmen Square in Beijing on Oct. 1, 2019.

China’s Nuclear Arms Are a Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery

Beijing's plans to build new missiles, expand anti-satellite capabilities and increase nuclear material production far above civilian needs have the world guessing.

A sign with the radiation warning symbol in front of the construction of the Duga Soviet over-the-horizon radar system near Chernobyl, Ukraine, on Nov. 22, 2018.

Low-Yield Nukes Are a Danger, Not a Deterrent

Deterrence theorists are pushing ideas that have never been tested.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right and South Korean President Moon Jae-in

Trump’s Penny-Pinching Dooms His Korean Diplomacy

The U.S. president stumbled into rare success with Pyongyang. Now he’s screwing it up.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un speaks at the May Day Stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Sept. 19, 2018.

Kim Jong Un’s Warning for Trump

With a deadline for restarting nuclear talks looming, North Korea ups the ante on the United States.

A woman walks past a television showing file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watching a missile launch, in Seoul on July 31.

New U.S. Missiles in Asia Could Increase the North Korean Nuclear Threat

After withdrawing from the INF Treaty, U.S. officials have been worrying about Beijing, but as Washington starts to deploy previously banned missiles in the Pacific, the real risk will come from Pyongyang.

A picture on display shows a Nike missile at one of the facilities that were used to store and potentially launch both conventional and nuclear-tipped Nike missiles in reaction to any Russian attack in Florida on April 8, 2010.

The United States’ Nuclear and Non-Nuclear Weapons Are Dangerously Entangled

New evidence from the Yom Kippur War shows how such knots can lead to nuclear annihilation.

U.S. President Donald Trump Meets North Korean leader Kim Jung Un

Trump Is More Vulnerable Than Ever to Kim Jong Un’s Nuclear Extortion

Trump’s growing impulsiveness and unilateral decision-making may signal to Kim that he can get precisely what he wants.

vela-incident-nuclear-test-1979-illustration

Blast From the Past

Forty years ago, a U.S. satellite detected the telltale signs of a nuclear explosion. An analysis of the evidence today points to a clandestine nuclear test, a Carter administration cover-up, and only one country that was willing and able to carry it out: Israel.

Indian government forces stand guard in the deserted city center of Srinagar on Aug. 15.

Why Indians and Pakistanis Want a War

Most South Asians are too young to have experienced the horrors of the conflicts fought in the region. That’s one reason why they’re quick to clamor for one.

A man uses binoculars to view the border with Israel on Sept. 2 at the "Garden of Iran" Park, which was built by the Iranian government, in the southern Lebanese village of Maroun al-Ras.

How to Make a Lasting Deal With Iran

Maximum pressure won’t make Tehran capitulate. Letting it enhance its conventional military capabilities could convince it to rein in proxies and curb its nuclear and missile programs.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and his Chinese counterpart, Wang Yi, shake hands during their meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing on Feb. 19.

China’s Great Game in Iran

Tehran needs a friend. Beijing may be a dangerous one.

Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the Federal Assembly at Moscow's Manezh Central Exhibition Hall for his state of the union address on March 1, 2018.

Is Russia’s Doomsday Missile Fake News?

Experts are skeptical that Moscow has the money or technical know-how to field Putin’s promised arsenal.

A container ship unloads its cargo from Asia at the Long Beach port in California on Aug. 1.

Our Top Weekend Reads

The U.S.-China trade war reignites, the Fed takes bold action, and a U.S.-Russia nuclear treaty comes to an end.

Russian soldiers sit on the launcher of a Tochka-M (Point-M) short-range missile at the military training ground outside of the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad on Oct. 5, 2005.

The INF Treaty Is Dead, and Russia Is the Biggest Loser

In a future arms race between Beijing, Moscow, and Washington, the Kremlin will never be able to keep up.

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Reagan sign a landmark treaty eliminating U.S. and Soviet intermediate-range and shorter-range nuke missiles in Washington in December 1987.

What Does the Demise of the INF Treaty Mean for Nuclear Arms Control?

Trump’s exit from the U.S.-Russia treaty, which officially takes effect Friday, raises questions about whether the era of arms control is ending—or being reinvented.

Document of the Week: When Sweden Wanted Nukes

A 1963 U.S. intelligence assessment underscores how many countries—even Sweden—were exploring nuclear weapons programs at the height of the Cold War.