nuclear weapons

A Russian flag flies next to the U.S. Embassy building in Moscow on Oct. 22. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Too Late to Save the INF Treaty

No one should dismiss lightly an agreement that has helped keep the United States and its allies safe for a generation.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, right, and NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg talk during a NATO foreign ministers meeting at the NATO headquarters in Brussels on Dec. 4. (John Thys/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump and NATO Show Rare Unity in Confronting Russia’s Arms Treaty Violation

NATO backs U.S. assertion that Moscow is violating a key Cold War-era arms treaty.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects the successful test-fire of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 at an undisclosed location on July 4, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

‘Camouflage, Concealment, and Deception’

What satellite imagery tells us about North Korea’s ballistic missile program.

Russian Navy Commander in Chief Adm. Vladimir Korolyov, President Vladimir Putin, and Defense Minister Gen. Sergei Shoigu examine a globe in St. Petersburg on July 30, 2017. (Alexey Nikolsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Pushing the United States Toward Nuclear Anarchy

The White House wants to leave the INF Treaty. New START could be next. The death of these agreements would fuel a new arms race.

This aerial photo taken on Jan. 2, 2017, shows a Chinese navy formation, including the aircraft carrier Liaoning (C), during military drills in the South China Sea. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Plan to Leave a Major Arms Treaty With Russia Might Actually Be About China

Leaving the agreement clears the way for the U.S. to boost its conventional forces in the Pacific.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with EU Foreign Policy Chief Federica Mogherini during a meeting at the European Union Headquarters in Brussels on May 25, 2017.

How Trump Can Get a Better Deal on Iran

The United States needs to keep Europe on board, go beyond sanctions, and ensure lasting bipartisan support for its new policy.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un meet in Singapore on June 12. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Will Republicans Lose Their Majority in Congress? Ask Pyongyang

North Koreans are watching the U.S. midterm elections closely, wondering how the results might affect negotiations with Trump.

Lassina Zerbo, the executive secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, in Vienna on Sept. 28, 2017. (Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

The Arms Control Believer

Lassina Zerbo isn’t letting the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty go.

This Davy Crockett will be displayed in the National Museum of the United States Army, under construction at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. (U.S. Army photo)

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

An Iranian military truck carries missiles past a portrait of Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei during a parade on the occasion of the country's annual army day on April 18, 2018 in Tehran.

How to Strike a Missile Deal With Iran

Tehran will never give up all of its ballistic missiles, but a compromise is possible.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with North Korean official Kim Yong Chol at the White House on June 1. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Washington Has to Learn Pyongyang’s Rules

Negotiating with North Korea is a tricky game, and the United States is already behind.

Iranian protesters hold a portrait of the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard's Quds Force, Gen. Qassem Suleimani, during a demonstration in the capital Tehran on December 11, 2017.

Iran Hawks Should Be Careful What They Wish For

Pushing for regime change in Tehran could put Qassem Suleimani in power.

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C. in December 1987. (AFP/Getty Images)

When Ronnie Met Mikhail​

On our podcast: As Trump sits down with Putin, we look back at a summit in Reykjavik that helped end the Cold War.

U.S. President Donald Trump (C), Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R), and South Korean President Moon Jae-in (L) pose for photos before attending the Northeast Asia Security Dinner at the U.S. Consulate General   in Hamburg, Germany, July 6, 2017.

With North Korea, Good Intentions Aren’t Enough

Trump's unilateral negotiating strategy will fail unless the United States collaborates with its regional allies — and adversaries — to forge a lasting peace.

Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces and future U.S. president, General Dwight D. Eisenhower (L) with British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (R), his deputy commander, in an unknown location in June 1944 after Allied forces stormed the Normandy beaches.

Washington Needs a New Solarium Project To Counter Cyberthreats

President Eisenhower confronted the unprecedented nuclear threat of the 1950s with a novel exercise. The United States needs a similar approach to tackle today's cyber threats.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sign documents as U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and the North Korean leader's sister, Kim Yo Jong, look on in Singapore on June 12, 2018.

Total Denuclearization Is an Unattainable Goal. Here’s How to Reduce the North Korean Threat.

The United States and South Korea must help Pyongyang convert its military nuclear complex for civilian use.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un departs Singapore  on June 12. (Singapore Ministry of Communications and Information via Getty Images)

Trump Pardons Another Celebrity Criminal

At the Singapore summit, the U.S. president let Kim off the hook.

South Korean soldiers participate in decontamination training.   (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Nukes Aren’t the End of North Korea’s Arsenal

Any deal needs to remember Pyongyang's range of deadly programs.

Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, right, greats North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 10. (Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s How the Trump-Kim Summit Could Play Out

No one knows for sure what will happen in Singapore. These are some of the possibilities.

U.S. President Donald Trump waves from the door of Air Force One upon arrival in Singapore on June 10. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is What North Korea Sanctions Relief Should Look Like

If North Korea agrees to denuclearize, here's how Trump should go about rolling back sanctions.

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