Pakistan

Supporters of the opposition Pakistan Democratic Movement carry their parties' flags during an anti-government rally in Quetta on Oct. 25.

Pakistan’s Anti-Government Movement May Hit the Brick Wall of the Security State

Economic woes are giving the alliance legs, but overturning a military-backed prime minister is a hard proposition.

An Agni-III nuclear-capable missile is paraded on Republic Day in New Delhi on Jan. 26, 2009.

Is India Overturning Decades of Nuclear Doctrine?

The country has good reason to want first-strike capabilities. But the actual state of its arsenal suggests that it won’t get them.

Young Pakistani youths hold national flags during a cycling competition near the Pakistan-China border on June 30, 2019.

Pakistan Is Doing Its Own Political Reengineering in Kashmir

After condemning New Delhi for its machinations in Jammu and Kashmir, Islamabad is quietly changing the status of Gilgit-Baltistan on its side of the Line of Control.

A Pakistani soldier stands next to a border fence along Afghanistan Paktika province in Angoor Adda, Pakistan on Oct. 18, 2017.

The Road to Peace In Afghanistan no Longer Runs Through Pakistan

Once considered a regional spoiler, Islamabad’s influence over the Taliban has waned.

A promotional photo from the Turkish TV show Dirilis: Ertugrul.

How Turkey’s Soft Power Conquered Pakistan

The TV drama “Ertugrul” reveals how neo-Ottoman fantasies are finding an enthusiastic audience in a country that struggles with Saudi and Western influence.

A Pakistan Army personnel looks on during the opening of a trade route project at the Gwadar port in Pakistan on Nov. 13, 2016.

The Pakistan Army’s Belt and Road Putsch

The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor is growing—and so is the role of the Pakistan Army.

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan addresses the legislative assembly in Muzaffarabad, the capital of Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, on Aug. 5.

Imran Khan Isn’t Going Anywhere

Pakistan’s prime minister might just become the first ever to complete a full term.

A Pakistan Navy soldier stands at the mausoleum of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the country’s founder, during Independence Day celebrations in Karachi on Aug. 14.

How Pakistan’s Military Lost Kashmir

An arrogant and bloated army bears its share of responsibility for Kashmiri suffering.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and China's President Xi Jinping attend a meeting in Shanghai on May 22, 2014.

Iran’s Pact With China Is Bad News for the West

Tehran’s new strategic partnership with Beijing will give the Chinese a strategic foothold and strengthen Iran’s economy and regional clout.

A Kashmiri boy looks out from his damaged family house after cross border shelling.

Kashmiris Lament the Loss of Their Youth

While much of India opened up to the world after the country’s 1991 reforms, Kashmir instead became the world’s most militarized zone. A generation of young people have suffered.

Indian security forces stand guard at a roadblock.

Kashmir’s Year of Hopelessness

One year on from New Delhi’s decision to revoke Kashmir’s autonomous privileges, the region remains ignored and underinvested. It’s difficult to see what could change the status quo.

Kaneez Sughra, the wife of abducted Pakistani journalist Matiullah Jan, displays a photograph of her husband on her mobile phone next to her son in Islamabad on July 21.

No, Mr. Prime Minister, Pakistan Does Not Have a Free Press

Imran Khan claims there’s nothing wrong. Abductions and terror say otherwise.

Pakistan Army and Coronavirus

In Pakistan, the Army Tightens Its Grip

As military expenditure soars in Pakistan despite an unprecedented economic catastrophe, Khan’s power looks to be waning.

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