Peace

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Only Women Can Stop the Apocalypse

Men make nuclear weapons more dangerous. So why do they still dominate the field?

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with Jared Kushner on June 21, 2017 in Jerusalem.

Trump Must Not Let Jared Kushner’s Peace Plan See the Light of Day

Releasing a U.S. proposal that is bound to fail would legitimize Israeli annexation, give Saudi Arabia leverage, and strengthen Iran and its allies.

Participants arrive to attend a two-day gathering of the Taliban and Afghan opposition representatives at the President Hotel in Moscow on Feb. 5.

The Afghan Government Can’t Make Peace With the Taliban on Its Own

Negotiations involving a broad group that represents all of Afghanistan—not just its senior politicians—are the only way to achieve a lasting settlement.

Israeli Culture and Sport Minister Miri Regev (C), Mohamed Bin Thaaloob al-Derai, President of UAE Wrestling Judo, and Kickboxing Federation (L) and International Judo Federation President Marius Vizer (R) chat during the Abu Dhabi Grand Slam Judo tournament in the Emirati capital Abu Dhabi on October 27, 2018.

How the Gulf States Got in Bed With Israel and Forgot About the Palestinian Cause

Benjamin Netanyahu is building ties with anti-Iran Arab leaders from Riyadh to Doha and betting that a peace deal is no longer a necessary prerequisite for normalizing diplomatic ties.

Pakistani army soldiers gather near a vehicle at a border terminal in Ghulam Khan, a town in North Waziristan, on the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan, on January 27, 2019.

Everyone Wants a Piece of Afghanistan

A U.S. withdrawal has opened the door to a possible political settlement, but success will depend on regional powers and the country’s neighbors.

A man wearing a Make Korea Great Again hat stands near conservative pro-U.S. demonstrators during a rally denouncing government policies toward North Korea in Seoul on March 1. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Failure in Hanoi Doesn’t Mean Peace Is Dead

The foundations need to be laid for a long, hard route ahead.

A soldier puts a flower on a grave in a cemetery for soldiers during the 60th anniversary of the '823 bombardment' in Kinmen, Taiwan on August 23, 2018.   (SAM YEH/AFP/Getty Images)

No Smiles Across the Taiwan Strait

Wars of words leave peace a long way off — and more aggression on the table.

Armed Houthi separatists brandish their weapons as they gather in the capital Sanaa on Dec. 13.   (Photo credit: Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Yemen’s Torment Finally Ending?

The latest cease-fire raises hopes, but officials fear war could break out again.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

A woman holds white balloons during a demonstration to demand the endorsement of the peace agreement between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia in Bogota on Nov. 30. (Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Are the Key to Peace

Cease-fire negotiations that exclude them are more likely to fall apart. Here’s how the U.N. can boost their participation at the bargaining table.

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin shakes hands with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at the start of the second trilateral meeting with U.S. President Jimmy Carter at Camp David on Sept. 7, 1978. The talks led to the Camp David Accords.(Bettmann Archives via Getty Images)

Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

A new diplomatic history argues that the United States, Egypt, and Israel prevented a Palestinian state from emerging. But leaders such as Yasser Arafat bear much of the blame.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, chairs a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Sept. 17. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Can Nikki Haley Deliver One Last Time?

It’s not too late for Trump’s departing U.N. ambassador to cut Washington’s peacekeeping costs.

U.S. President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat shake hands before a meeting in Oslo to discuss the Mideast peace process on Nov. 2, 1999. (Lise Aserud/AFP/Getty Images)

If Trump Wants the Ultimate Deal, He Must Not Repeat These Mistakes

Israeli-Palestinian peace is elusive because both sides—and the United States—have made a series of damaging but preventable errors.

A United Nations  peacekeeper speaks to a child while on patrol through the streets Gao, Mali on August 3, 2018.

Peace Is the Best Investment

U.N. member states must renew their commitment to the vital peacekeeping operations that end wars, protect civilians, and save lives.

A Kosovar police officer walks past burning logs as Kosovo Albanians gather around a barricade blocking access to a village due to be visited by the Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, on the main road between Mitrovica, in the north of Kosovo, and the village of Banje, a Serbian enclave on Sept. 9.

Partition in Kosovo Will Lead to Disaster

Ill-advised land swaps and population transfers won’t bring peace. They’re more likely to revive the bloodshed that plagued the Balkans during the 1990s.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner meet with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) at the King David Hotel May 22, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel.

For Palestinians, America Was Never an Honest Broker

The Trump administration’s policies don’t represent a radical shift. The White House has simply abandoned the facade of neutrality and rubber-stamped the Israeli government’s agenda.

U.S. President Bill Clinton, center, prepares to give the opening address of the historic Israel-PLO Oslo Accords signing ceremony on Sept. 13, 1993 at the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat at his side. (Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images)

The Oslo Accords Are Dead, but There Is Still a Path to Peace

On the 25th anniversary of the landmark Israeli-Palestinian deal, activists and diplomats should focus on recreating the conditions that made it possible.

Sri Lankan women gather to demand peace talks between the government and Tamil Tiger rebels in Colombo on Dec. 10, 2004. (Sena Vidanagama/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Make Peace Stick

When only men sit at the negotiating table, cease-fires fall apart.

An engraving at the French National Library shows the ratification of the Peace of Westphalia in Nuremberg, Germany, on June 16, 1650. (Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

Meet the Middle East’s Peace of Westphalia Re-enactors

Can a series of far-flung, high-level conferences bring peace to the Middle East by applying lessons from 17th-century Europe?

Eritrean Foreign Minister Osman Saleh Mohammed (R) walks with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (C) as an Eritrean delegation arrives for peace talks with Ethiopia at the international airport in Addis Ababa on June 26, 2018.

Ethiopia and Eritrea Have a Common Enemy

Abiy Ahmed and Isaias Afwerki are racing toward peace because they both face the same threat: hard-liners in the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front.

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