Philippines

People check their mobile phones next to Huawei advertising in Shanghai, China, on May 10.

Huawei Ban Takes Effect

The U.S. ban of Huawei escalates the trade war with China, government and opposition representatives for Venezuela return to the negotiating table, and U.S. lawmakers fear skewed intelligence on Iran.

Iranian demonstrators raise placards as they chant anti-US slogans during a rally in Tehran on May 10.

Iran’s Rhetoric Heats Up

Iran responds to U.S. military presence in the Gulf, China and the United States reach a deadlock in the trade war, and what to watch in the world this week.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

Mozambican women and expecting mothers wait to receive medical care at the Murrupelane maternity ward in Nacala, Mozambique, on July 5. (Gianluigi Guercia/ AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Is Erasing Reproductive Rights at Home and Abroad

The removal of information from the State Department’s annual reports has grave consequences for human rights monitoring worldwide.

A Japanese soldier walks past amphibious assault vehicles during an amphibious landing exercise at the beach of the navy training center in Zambales province, north of Manila, as a part of a joint military exercise with the United States and the Philippines on Oct. 6. (Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images)

The Quad Is Not Enough

Trump has revived a four-way security dialogue among the United States, India, Australia, and Japan, but if it's going to make China pay attention, it will need some new members.

Relatives of people killed during the anti-drug operation participate in a Catholic-led  protest in Manila on November 5, 2017.
(NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Duterte vs. God

The Philippine president likes to pick fights. But can he win against the Catholic Church?

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

The New Economy’s Old Business Model Is Dead

Tech companies are used to pairing big revenues with small labor forces. But they’ll soon be forced to become massive job creators.

Sisal Creative illustration for Foreign Policy; Sean Money and Elizabeth Fay for Foreign Policy

The End of Human Rights?

Learning from the failure of the Responsibility to Protect and the International Criminal Court.

Nanette Castillo grieves next to the dead body of her son Aldrin, an alleged drug user killed by unidentified assailants in Manila on Oct. 3, 2017.

Only the Law Can Stop Duterte’s Murderous War on Drugs

Local lawyers are fighting to hold the Philippine government accountable. To win, they need international human rights groups to give them more help.

(Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

How to Stand Up For Human Rights in the Age of Trump

Western democracies that were once reliable defenders of human rights have been consumed by a nativist backlash, leaving an open field for dictators and demagogues.

Philippine Senator Leila de Lima waves to supporters after appearing in court outside Manila on Feb. 24. (Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images)

A Message From Philippine Sen. Leila de Lima

The 2017 Global Thinker hopes that the world will "keep watching the Philippines."

Government troops keep watch as bombed-out buildings are seen in what was the main battle area in Marawi on the southern island of Mindanao on Oct. 25, days after the military declared the fighting against IS-inspired Muslim militants over. (Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images)

Is the Philippines the Next Caliphate?

ISIS is looking to regroup, and is setting its sights eastward.

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on Oct. 16. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Needs to Show That He Is Serious About America’s Rivalry With China

The president should use his trip to Asia to reassure allies and assert U.S. power.

HONG KONG - JULY 07:  China's first aircraft carrier Liaoning aircraft carrier arrives on July 7, 2017 in Hong Kong, Hong Kong. China's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, made a five-day port call in Hong Kong over the weekend to mark its 20th anniversary of the city's handover to Chinese rule. The military allowed 2,000 Hong Kongers aboard the only in-operation aircraft carrier of China for the first time as its been reported the presence of the carrier is a show of military force in Hong Kong, days after China President Xi Jinping warned the city against independence forces.  (Photo by Keith Tsuji/Getty Images)

The Week Donald Trump Lost the South China Sea

Vietnam's capitulation shows China's neighbors fear the U.S. no longer has their backs.

This picture taken on May 18, 2017, shows police officers investigating an alleged drug dealer killed by unidentified gunman in Manila.
President Rodrigo Duterte swept to an election victory last year largely on a pledge to wipe out his nation's illegal drugs trade within three to six months, saying he would do so by killing thousands of people. Duterte fulfilled his vow on the death toll, drawing condemnation from rights groups who warned he may be orchestrating a crime against humanity as police and unknown assassins filled slums with bullet-ridden corpses. / AFP PHOTO / NOEL CELIS        (Photo credit should read NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Duterte’s Death Squads Were Born in America’s Cold War

The Philippines' new "war on drugs" is claiming thousands of lives. But the culture of vigilante violence started with anti-communism.

Evacuees from Marawi City camp rest at the Saguiaran Townhall in Lanao del Sur on the southern island of Mindanao on June 5, 2017. 
Efforts to rescue up to 2,000 civilians trapped in fighting between government forces and Islamist militants in a Philippine city failed on June 4 when a proposed truce ended in a hail of gunfire and explosions, authorities and witnesses said. / AFP PHOTO / NOEL CELIS        (Photo credit should read NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Duterte’s War on Terror Also Looks Like a War on Civilians

The Philippines’ unbridled war on terror looks uncomfortably like its war on drugs.

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In Leaked Call, Trump Praises Duterte’s Campaign to ‘Slaughter’ Drug Addicts

In a private phone conversation, the two presidents chatted about nuclear submarines and a drug campaign that has killed thousands.

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The Real Reason Trump Shouldn’t Meet With Duterte

U.S. presidents and Cabinet officials have met with worse than Duterte, but the Philippine leader is all but invigorating China's rise.

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