Photo Essays

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden gives a thumbs-up as he leaves Pennsylvania Hospital after a follow up appointment at the radiology department December 12 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Why Biden thinks the way he does about foreign policy, what the future holds for an America on the brink, and what the Cold War policy of containment means for our current moment—all from our latest magazine issue.

U.S. President Donald Trump

Trump Mounts Last-Minute Attempt to Starve Funding for Foreign Aid, Global Vaccine Efforts

But congressional sources say it’s highly unlikely lawmakers will cut billions of dollars of already appropriated funding.

A Swiss soldier stands at attention in front of a Swiss flag in Bern, Switzerland, on Sept. 8, 2010.

The End of Swiss Neutrality

The country is campaigning for a seat on the U.N. Security Council, but taking on that role will clash with some fundamental tenets of Swiss foreign policy.

Police officers detain a woman wearing a T-shirt reading "Freedom to Safronov" in Moscow

Russia’s Security Agencies Are Both Terrifying and Incompetent

The ineptitude of the FSB sends a message about how powerful it is.

excerpts from FP archives

FP Looks Back

Archival passages from writers such as Hillary Clinton, Kofi Annan, Zbigniew Brzezinski, and more show where we’ve been—and where we’re heading.

A sign showing images of people wanted in connection with the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol

The American Far-Right Is Dangerous but Disorganized

Despite murderous ambitions and abundant guns, the Capitol assault was a failure.

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The Next 50 Years of Foreign Policy

A survey of experts offers predictions on the future of U.S. leadership and geopolitical dominance.

William Burns, the then-undersecretary of state for political affairs, testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in Washington on March 17, 2011.

Under Burns, the CIA Gets a New Focus

Biden’s pick for the agency’s director shows that diplomacy is back.

Early versions of Foreign Policy featured a narrow format and a different logo color for each season—blue for winter, green for spring, burgundy for summer, and yellow or brown for fall.

Consensus Lost

How FP set out to change the world.

Janine di Giovanni in Helmand province, Afghanistan, in January 2010.

The First Draft of History

Why the decline of foreign reporting makes for worse foreign policy.

A photo proof from the Toronto Star archives of John Kenneth Galbraith 
on Dec. 29, 1972.

America Abandoned Its Economic Prophet. The World Embraced Him.

John Kenneth Galbraith was an intellectual celebrity 50 years ago—and it would be a mistake to ignore him today.

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The Return of Containment

What the Cold War policy means for our current moment.

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How to Restore U.S. Credibility in Africa

By standing up for democracy and free trade, the United States can outflank China and Russia, its authoritarian rivals on the continent.

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A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

bad-Ideas-foreign-policy-50-years-joan-wong-illustration-article

When U.S. Foreign Policy Went Wrong

How to spot a bad concept when you see it.

President Donald Trump departs after speaking in Washington on April 17, 2019.

A Conservative Foreign Policy for the Future

Continuity, not revolution, should guide the United States.

Joe Biden in Washington on Dec. 14., 2017.

Inside Joe Biden’s Foreign-Policy Worldview

The next U.S. president isn’t an intellectual—and that’s a good thing.

doomsday-worst-predictions-foreign-policy-joan-wong-illustration_SW_V1

Wonks Gone Wild

In FP’s 50 years, its writers’ forecasts have ranged from prescient to spectacularly wrong. That’s because the field of international relations rewards catastrophic thinking.