Photo Essays

British best-selling author John le Carré on Oct. 16, 2017. Christian Charisius/picture alliance via Getty Images

Could a Spy Save Liberal Democracy?

John Le Carré’s latest protagonist bridges his old and new heroes, contending with the question of loyalty to a liberal society in crisis.

Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias (right) meets with Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar (left) in Athens, Greece, on Jan. 17, 2020, ahead of a peace conference in Berlin aimed at ending the civil war in Libya.

Russia’s Role in the Libyan Civil War Gives It Leverage Over Europe

Russia has played all sides in the conflict to get a seat at the negotiating table. Now it wants an end to sanctions.

Activists rally for climate action at Sydney Town Hall

Our Top Weekend Reads

Australia’s climate denialist media, a pro-independence mandate in Taiwan, and power-sharing returns to Northern Ireland.

Daniel Brokstad illustration for Foreign Policy

Socialism: Why It’s Back and What It Means

Essays on how social democracy can save the world, as well as counterpoints on why capitalism remains the best way for populations to thrive.

Iraqi mourners gather at the Shaheed Mohammed Baqir al-Sadr Bridge in Basra, Iraq, on Jan. 7, 2019, as they welcome the body of Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the slain chief of Hashed al-Shaabi, an Iraqi paramilitary force with close ties to Iran.

Qassem Suleimani Wanted U.S. Troops Out of Iraq. If They Go, ISIS Will Be Back.

The slain Iranian general helped defeat the Islamic State in Iraq, but his death is likely to unleash the sort of sectarian strife that Sunni extremists thrive on.

Then-Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in 2010

Putin Is Planning a Partial Retirement

The Russian president may never leave the political stage—but he's now ready to take a step back.

iran-us-plane-crash-1988-document-article

Anatomy of an Accidental Shootdown

Three decades ago, a perfect storm of miscommunication, miscalculation, and human error in the heat of battle caused the United States to make a mistake similar to the one Iran just did.

Taiwanese navy personnel salute during a drill near the Suao naval harbor in Yilan, eastern Taiwan, on April 13, 2018.

Taiwan Needs More Than Election Victories to Fend Off China

The growing threat from the mainland can only be deterred by a public willing to make sacrifices.

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a New Year’s address to Russians in central Moscow on Dec. 31, 2017.

Putin Is Following the Game Plan of Other Autocrats Before Him

And moves like his Jan. 15 announcement generally work—both to secure a leader’s power and ensure a favorable transition down the road.

Businesspeople and shoppers walk along Madison Avenue in New York City on Nov. 1, 2011.

The Left and Right Are Wrong About Inequality

The problem isn’t trade or corporations—it’s the monopolization by professional groups of high-profit services.

Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok arrives prior to a bilateral meeting with the European Union's minister for foreign affairs and security policy at the EU headquarters in Brussels on Nov. 11, 2019.

Sudan’s New Prime Minister Grapples With His Country’s Past

Abdalla Hamdok wasn't sure he wanted the job, but six months later there is reason to hope—despite the failed mutiny this week.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (C) with Britain's then-Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson (R), France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L), Germany Foreign Minister Heiko Maas (2nd L) at the EU headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018.

Europe Is Running Out of Time to Save the Iran Deal

After initiating a dispute resolution process, European leaders have a limited window to provide Iran with meaningful economic relief and seek to reduce tensions between Tehran and Washington.

A BMW employee works at the new BMW car production plant in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, on June 6, 2019.

NAFTA’s Replacement Gives Labor Some Shelter From Globalization’s Storms

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement sets new standards for workers — but can’t stand alone.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Jean-Claude Juncker, then-president of the European Commission, in Brussels on Oct. 17, 2019.

Avoiding Autarky

For some nations, trade and cooperation are becoming less attractive. But the world needs more coordination, not less.

A pro-Trump message on a house in the village of Doonbeg in County Clare, Ireland, on the main road to Trump International Golf Club on June 6, 2019.

Trump’s Growing European Base

Attitudes toward the United States are improving across the Atlantic—but only because the right wing is getting stronger.

Former U.S. diplomat Nicholas Burns testifies before the Senate.

Pompeo’s Silence Creates a ‘Crisis of Morale’ at State Department

“The rank and file are very disturbed by the inability, the refusal, of the secretary of state to defend his own people,” says former diplomat Nicholas Burns.

Myanmar's State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi stands before the UN International Court of Justice on Dec. 10, 2019, in the Hague.

Myanmar Has Blazed a Path to Democracy Without Rights

Aung San Suu Kyi’s persecution of the Rohingya paved the way for Modi.

Children learn how to use an insecticide-treated net to prevent malaria exposure in South Sudan on April 2, 2009.

How to Reverse the World’s Trust Deficit Disorder

Public-private partnerships can solve the planet’s most vexing problems—but they need to focus on systemic change rather than single issues to succeed.

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