Poland

Supporters of the ruling Law and Justice party (PiS) attend a ceremony marking the seventh anniversary of the presidential plane crash in Smolensk, Russia in front of the presidential palace in Warsaw, on April 10, 2017. Then-Polish President Lech Kaczynski the twin brother of PiS's figurehead, Jaroslaw Kaczynski—was among those who died in the crash on April 10, 2010.

Poland’s Historical Revisionism Is Pushing It Into Moscow’s Arms

The country doesn’t need an openly pro-Russian political party. Its own government’s attempts to rewrite Polish history play directly into Vladimir Putin’s hands.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban shake hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu  at the prime minister's office in Jerusalem, Israel, July 19, 2018.

Theodor Herzl Was Willing to Tolerate Europe’s Far-Right. Should Israel’s Leaders Do the Same?

Shunning populist parties won’t make Jews safer. Engaging with them is a matter of realpolitik, and Israel should focus on contemporary threats, not those of the past.

Robert Biedron, the liberal, pro-European and openly-gay mayor of the north Polish city of Slupsk, greets supporters at the launch of his new political movement Wiosna on Feb. 3, 2019 in Warsaw. (Omar Marques/Getty Images)

The Future of Politics Is Coming to Poland

Promising newcomers are threatening to tear apart the country’s two-party system in every direction.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

Protesters attend an anti-government demonstration in support of abortion rights in Warsaw on April 9, 2016.

Poland Is Trying to Make Abortion Dangerous, Illegal, and Impossible

Ireland voted to liberalize abortion laws. The far-right government in Warsaw is moving in the opposite direction.

A Polish ultranationalist waits for the beginning of a demonstration in Warsaw on Nov. 11, 2010. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Extreme Nationalism Is as Polish as Pierogi

It’s entirely fitting that Poland is celebrating its independence with a far-right nationalist parade.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump prior to the president's departure from Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv on May 23, 2017.

Trump First, Jews Later

Israeli government officials are helping to normalize the violent anti-Semitism of the Christian right.

A woman holds a candle as protesters take part in a demonstration in front of the Polish Supreme Court on July 23, 2017, in Warsaw to protest against a new bill changing the judiciary system. (Janek Skarnyzski/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s Opposition Has Nobody to Blame but Itself

After another lackluster election, Polish liberals should stop attacking the government and start taking a hard look in the mirror.

U.S. and Polish troops in Orzysz, Poland, on April 13, 2017. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Fort Trump Is a Farce

The question of a permanent U.S. military presence in Poland is complicated. The White House shouldn’t treat it as a vanity project.

Far-right protesters in Poland hold an anti-EU banner during a demonstration in Warsaw on a Jul. 25, 2015. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s New Populism

Warsaw may be turning away from the European Union, but that doesn’t mean that it is turning toward Moscow instead.

Viktor Orban gestures during a debate about Hungary as part of a plenary session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg on September 11, 2018. (Frederick Florian/AFP/Getty Images)

In Hungary, Social Conservatism and Authoritarianism Aren’t the Same

The European Parliament needs to start condemning Orban for the right reasons.

President of the European Council Donald Tusk during a news conference in Brussels on March 22. (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

Europe’s Donald Can Fight Dirty, Too

Donald Tusk is the mild-mannered president of a quiet EU institution—and the West’s loudest voice against populism.

Steve Bannon, former White House Chief Strategist to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks at a debate at Zofin Palace on May 22, 2018 in Prague, Czech Republic.

The Nationalist Internationale Is Crumbling

Steve Bannon is trying to sell Trumpism to Eastern Europeans—but shared ideologies die hard when they run into economic and military realities.

Radoslaw Sikorski, a former Polish minister of foreign affairs and defense, in Krakow, Poland, on December 17, 2017.  (Beata Zawrzel/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

‘We Have No Idea What President Trump Would Do in a Crisis with Russia.’

Poland’s former defense and foreign minister explains how Trump left Eastern Europe in the lurch.

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Longtime Neighbors

The hidden history of Poland’s Muslims.

French writer, journalist and movie producer Claude Lanzmann poses in Paris on Feb. 11, 2016. (Joel Saget / AFP)

The Holocaust Existentialist

Filmmaker Claude Lanzmann, dead at 92, showed the world the Holocaust through eyewitnesses.

Austria's Interior Minister Herbert Kickl (L), Italy's Interior Minister and deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini (R) and Austria's Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache (C) arrive to give a joint press conference at the end of their meeting at the Viminale palace in Rome on June 20, 2018.

Eastern Europe’s Populists Don’t Care About Italy

Matteo Salvini wants to be buddies with anti-immigrant leaders in Hungary, Poland, and Austria. But sometimes geography trumps ideology.

Rep Ro Khanna (D-CA) speaks at a rally on April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for MoveOn.org)

Eastern European Laws on World War II History Spark Congressional Reaction

Will a letter sent by concerned lawmakers encourage leaders to change course or further polarize politics?

Jaroslaw Kaczynski attends a ceremony marking the fifth anniversary of the presidential plane crash in Smolensk on April 10, 2015. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Has the Clock Run Out on the Smolensk Conspiracy?

Blaming the Russians, or political opponents, only goes so far.

A visitor at the entrance of the memorial site of the former Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland, on Jan. 25, 2015. (Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s Misunderstood Holocaust Law

My government wants to ban accusations of Polish wartime complicity for the sake of honoring history.

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