populism

President Donald Trump and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrive for a bilateral meeting during the G7 summit on Aug. 25, 2019 in Biarritz, France.

The Pandemic Is the World’s Long Overdue Reality Check

Populists came to power peddling political fantasies—but the coronavirus has broken the fever.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro

Brazil Is Suffering. Bolsonaro Isn’t.

The Brazilian president is proving that right-wing populism has ways of overcoming self-inflicted disasters.

People displaced by drought walking at a displaced persons camp.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Southeast Asia is turning a blind eye to the Rohingya, Israel-Jordan relations are deteriorating, and Kataib Hezbollah is losing influence in Iraq.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban leaves following a meeting during the second day of a special European Council summit in Brussels on Feb. 21.

Why Populists Want a Multipolar World

Aspiring authoritarians are sick of the liberal order and eager for new patrons in Russia and China.

Demonstrators set up a mock customs checkpoint to protest against potential trade restrictions due to Brexit in Killeen, Northern Ireland, on Feb. 18, 2017.

Globalization Will Look Very Different After the Coronavirus Pandemic

New barriers are going up at breathtaking speed. The pandemic will accelerate not the demise of globalization but its transformation.

Alexander Gauland (foreground), the parliamentary group co-leader of Germany's far-right Alternative for Germany, and members of his party's parliamentary group attend a session at the Bundestag, Germany's lower house of parliament, in Berlin on March 25.

The Coronavirus Has Paralyzed Europe’s Far-Right

The continent’s borders are closed, as extreme nationalists always wanted—but they’re one of the pandemic's victims anyway.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban delivers his state of the nation address in Budapest on Feb. 18, 2018.

The Shocking ‘Coronavirus Coup’ in Hungary Was a Wake-Up Call

While the world is shut down, history hasn’t stopped. Authoritarians are seizing the opportunity.

From left: Chinese President Xi Jinping; He Lifeng, the chairman of China's National Development and Reform Commission; Italian Labor and Industry Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio; and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte attend a signing ceremony following their meeting at Villa Madama in Rome on March 23, 2019.

China Isn’t Helping Italy. It’s Waging Information Warfare.

The populist Five Star Movement has become China’s chief enabler as Beijing spreads disinformation about the origins of the coronavirus while sending aid shipments to EU countries where it seeks influence.

Mourners gather around the body of Mohammed Mudasir, who died in sectarian riots in New Delhi

India’s Muslims Accuse Police of Targeted Killings

As protests against a new citizenship law sweep the country, signs that the authorities are condoning and even instigating violence have India’s Muslims alarmed.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump arrive for a group photo at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, on June 28, 2019.

Foreign Interference Starts at Home

The West is obsessing about how its democracies are under attack—except when it comes to all the self-inflicted damage.

Sinn Fein’s Donnchadh O Laoghaire

Ireland’s Populists Are Not Really Populist

After decades of militant radicalism, Sinn Fein won last week’s elections by moving toward the mainstream.

Björn Höcke and Thomas Kemmerich

Behold Germany’s Post-Merkel Future and Despair

The chancellor’s pathological centrism has helped make her party morally blind.

Supporters of the anti-Matteo Salvini "Sardine Movement," gather in Piazza San Giovanni in Latrerano on Dec.14, 2019 in Rome.

Italy’s Sardines Want to Stop Matteo Salvini. They Might End Up Strengthening Him.

By depicting the far-right League leader as a villain, a grassroots movement calling for civility in politics could help hand the leftist stronghold of Emilia-Romagna to the right.

An armed security guard stands on the rooftop of a hotel, next to letters covered in snow reading “Davos,” ahead of the opening of the 2018 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 22, 2018.

The Global Trust Crisis

World leaders at venues like Davos need to start taking the public’s declining faith in institutions seriously—or face more upheaval to come.

An AfD election brochure in Russian and German

Immigrants Are Big Fans of Germany’s Anti-Immigrant Party

The fiercest devotees of the far-right AfD aren’t native Germans but migrants from Russia.

Supporters listen as 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg speaks during a campaign event in Muscatine, Iowa, on Aug. 14, 2019.

The Real Way to Win Iowa and Places Like It

There are plenty of innovative policies to revive rural areas—and trade wars aren’t among them.

Supporters of the Law and Justice party watch the announcement of the results of the Polish parliamentary elections on television screens in Warsaw on Oct. 13.

Poland’s State of the Media

How public television became an outlet for the Law and Justice party—and what it means for democracy.

Gergely Karacsony addresses an audience in Budapest, Hungary, after his victory in the capital city's mayoral election.

Europe’s Populist Governments Have a Problem: Their Capitals

City-level opposition could be the key to defeating populism in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and beyond.

New Democratic Party leader Jagmeet Singh (from left), Green Party leader Elizabeth May, and People's Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier take part in a French-language debate at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec, on Oct. 10.

The Cure for Populism Is Equal Opportunity

Maxime Bernier flopped in Canada because voters still believe everyone has a fair shot.