populism

A Polish ultranationalist waits for the beginning of a demonstration in Warsaw on Nov. 11, 2010. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Extreme Nationalism Is as Polish as Pierogi

It’s entirely fitting that Poland is celebrating its independence with a far-right nationalist parade.

The political theorist and historian Isaiah Berlin on Oct. 23, 1992. (Sophie Bassouls/Sygma via Getty Images)

We Are All Isaiah Berliners Now

Nationalism is back, but nobody seems to know what it means. A forgotten essay marking its 40th anniversary can help.

Jair Bolsonaro, the president-elect of Brazil, casts his vote in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28. (Ricardo Moraes-Pool/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro Can’t Destroy Brazilian Democracy

Brazil’s new president is a throwback to its authoritarian past—but the country is more resilient than it used to be.

European Council President Donald Tusk (from left), British Prime Minister Theresa May, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and U.S. President Donald Trump prepare for a photo at the G-7 summit in La Malbaie, Canada, on June 7. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

The Economic Crisis Is Over. Populism Is Forever.

From the United States to Germany, the West is booming—but the public hasn’t regained an appetite for liberalism.

A man reads newspaper headlines announcing Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in the Brazil’s presidential election in São Paulo on Oct. 29. (Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Military Is Not the Problem

Democracy will depend on whether civilians can exploit rifts between Bolsonaro and his base while regaining voter trust.

A single tree stands in a deforested area of Pará on Oct. 14. (Raphael Alves/AFP/Getty Images)

To Gut the Amazon, Bolsonaro Needs Local Help

The Brazilian president-elect can’t pursue his environmental policies on his own. After this weekend’s state elections, he’ll have the backing he needs.

A supporter of Brazil's far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a rally in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 21. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Just the Right That’s Voting for Bolsonaro. It’s Everyone.

Brazil’s populist firebrand is relying on conservative values, fear of crime, anger about corruption, and rampant fake news to gain support from across the political spectrum.

Street protests have erupted in Brazil in opposition to far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, right, who is leading in polls over his opponent, Fernando Haddad, left. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images/Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images/Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images/Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

FP’s Guide to the Brazilian Election

Ten things to read or listen to before the vote.

Two women stand next to women wearing the niqab in the Hague, the Netherlands, on Nov. 23, 2016. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

How to Compromise With Populism

It’s still possible to prevent the West from collapsing into permanent culture war—but only if it takes a totally new approach to nationalism.

Italy's populist Five Star Movement leader Luigi Di Maio (R) with party members Roberto Fico (L) and Alessandro Di Battista (C) after an election campaign meeting in Piazza del Popolo in Rome on March 2, 2018.

Italy’s Left-Wing Populists Won’t Stop the Far-Right. They’ll Strengthen It.

The Five Star Movement’s most prominent leftist, Alessandro Di Battista, is returning to politics, but don’t expect him to reverse the government’s anti-immigrant agenda.

A woman holds a candle as protesters take part in a demonstration in front of the Polish Supreme Court on July 23, 2017, in Warsaw to protest against a new bill changing the judiciary system. (Janek Skarnyzski/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s Opposition Has Nobody to Blame but Itself

After another lackluster election, Polish liberals should stop attacking the government and start taking a hard look in the mirror.

Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, co-leaders of the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, arrive to speak on immigration and crime on September 18, 2017 in Berlin.

The Party Is Over

The mass political movements that once dominated Europe are fading fast—and the nationalist populists and upstart parties taking their place are here to stay.

People carry German flags and a banner which reads "Stop Islamization" during a march organized by the far-right AfD party in Rostock,  Germany on September 22, 2018.

Germany’s New Politics of Cultural Despair

Will the return of the European far-right be the undoing of the West?

Far-right Brazilian presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro at a press conference in Rio de Janeiro on Oct 11. (Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images)

The Sad Decline of Brazil’s Political Establishment

Voters are manifesting their profound unhappiness with the status quo. Jair Bolsonaro is the result.

Katharina Schulze, the lead candidate for the Greens, speaks at the Gillamoos folk fest in Abensberg on Sept. 3. (Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images)

In Bavaria, Green Could Be King

Forget the rise of the AfD. The real story in this weekend’s elections may well be the rise of the Greens, which will reshape German politics.

A Swedish flag is seen in Malmo on June 6, 2015. (Harry Engels/Getty Images)

Is Sweden Ungovernable?

The rise of populist parties has made it nearly impossible to form governments across Europe—and the deadlock only fuels support for populists.

Jair Bolsonaro waves to the crowd during a military event in São Paulo on May 3. (Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

The Military Returns to Brazilian Politics

As Bolsonaro takes the lead, the future looks dim for democracy in Brasília.

Jair Bolsonaro looks on during a press conference he called to announce his intention to run for the Brazilian presidency in the October 2018 election, in Rio de Janeiro on August 10, 2017. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images)

Jair Bolsonaro’s Model Isn’t Berlusconi. It’s Goebbels.

The far-right Brazilian leader isn’t just another conservative populist. His propaganda campaign has taken a page straight from the Nazi playbook.

Far-right protesters in Poland hold an anti-EU banner during a demonstration in Warsaw on a Jul. 25, 2015. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s New Populism

Warsaw may be turning away from the European Union, but that doesn’t mean that it is turning toward Moscow instead.

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