protests

French president Emmanuel Macron (L) and his Egyptian counterpart Abdel Fattah al-Sisi (R) take part in an official diner at the Al Massah hotel, in Cairo, on Jan. 28, 2019.

Western Leaders Are Promoting Dictatorship, Not Democracy, in Egypt

Emmanuel Macron’s visit to Cairo and Donald Trump’s cheerleading have bolstered Abdel Fattah al-Sisi as he faces popular protest over his latest power grab.

A Russian man pauses on a street in central Moscow on March 10, 2017. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Russians Lower Their Standards

Life may be getting harder in Russia, but Putin doesn’t care.

A man waves a French flag next to an Italian flag, as other protesters wearing a yellow vest demonstrate on December 22, 2018, in Ventimiglia near the French-Italian border.

Italy’s Populists Have Lost Their Luster. They’re Looking to France to Win It Back.

Five Star used to be a protest movement; now it’s the establishment. By bashing Emmanuel Macron and embracing the yellow vest uprising, it’s hoping to restore its radical credentials.

The opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks during a meeting with deputies, media, and supporters, organized by the National Assembly, at Plaza Bolívar de Chacao in Caracas on Jan. 25. (Edilzon Gamez/Getty Images)

Maduro’s Power in Venezuela Seems Stable, for Now

Despite the recognition by a wave of countries of the opposition leader Juan Guaidó as president, Maduro’s patronage of the military insulates him from the need to negotiate.

A police officer removes tires set by protesters during a demonstration in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, on Jan. 14. (Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images)

Zimbabwe Crackdown Saps Hopes of Reform

The violence is a blow to Zimbabweans who hoped for greater freedom of expression in the post-Mugabe era.

A Moroccan draped in the Berber, or Amazigh, flag shouts slogans while marching during a protest against the jailing of Al-Hirak or "Popular Movement" activists in the capital Rabat on July 15, 2018.

Morocco’s Crackdown Won’t Silence Dissent

Across the country, protesters are increasingly willing to criticize the government and the monarchy—even in the face of repression.

President Omar al-Bashir appears at a rally with his supporters in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is the Uprising Sudan’s Genocidal Dictator Always Feared

The country’s current protests include all sections of society—and may soon topple Omar al-Bashir’s entire regime.

President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses the press during the Argentina G20 Leaders' Summit 2018 on Dec. 1 in Buenos Aires. (Daniel Jayo/Getty Images)

Erdogan’s Anti-Semitism Will Sink Turkey’s Economy

The Turkish president’s racist conspiracy theories are a threat to economic stability.

French President Emmanuel Macron speaks during a special address to the nation, his first public comments after four weeks of nationwide 'yellow vest' (gilet jaune) protests, on December 10, 2018 in Paris. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Macron’s Destiny to Be Hated

The French president can make all the concessions he wants, but he can’t make the public like him.

A man wears a mask of French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against rising fuel prices on Nov. 17 in Haulchin, France. (Francois Lo Presti/AFP/Getty Images)

Les Misérables vs. Macron

France’s angry nationwide protests are less like a revolution than a Tea Party—and that’s bad news for the government.

Demonstrators wave a British flag with European Union stars and European Union flags as they take part in a march calling for a People's Vote on the final Brexit deal, in central London on Oct. 20.

A Second Vote on Brexit Won’t Enhance Democracy. It Will Undermine It.

The elitist proponents of a “people’s vote” don’t care about the popular will. They only care about getting the outcome they want.

Indian activists shout slogans outside a police station as they demand justice for Bollywood actress Tanushree Dutta, who has accused actor Nana Patekar of sexual harassment, in Mumbai on October 11.

India’s #MeToo Moment Came Late, but It Will Be Transformative

The rage that animated protests against sexual violence in 2012 has returned, and Indian women are fearlessly speaking out against powerful perpetrators.

Soldiers of the 21st Motorized Infantry Brigade patrol in the streets of Buea, Cameroon on April 26, 2018.

The United States Can Stop Cameroon’s Brutal Crackdown

Washington must not ignore atrocities against the country’s Anglophones. It should use existing U.S. laws to force an end to the violence.

A car passes by Facebook's corporate headquarters in Menlo Park, California, on March 21. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)

Anti-Racism Groups Feel Tarred by Facebook’s Fight Against Fake Accounts

Latest discovery underscores challenge of countering disinformation campaigns.

Iranian protesters hold a portrait of the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard's Quds Force, Gen. Qassem Suleimani, during a demonstration in the capital Tehran on December 11, 2017.

Iran Hawks Should Be Careful What They Wish For

Pushing for regime change in Tehran could put Qassem Suleimani in power.

Masih Alinejad outside her home in New York in May. (Jesse Dittmar for Foreign Policy)

Those Who Dare to Bare Their Hair

Masih Alinejad is helping Iranian women challenge the regime — one hijab at a time.

Anti-government demonstrators hold a protest demanding Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, to stand down, in Managua on May 26, 2018.

Can Nicaragua’s Military Prevent a Civil War?

President Daniel Ortega’s crackdown on protests has driven the country to the brink. If the violence escalates, it could spark a refugee crisis and destabilize all of Central America.

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