Public Health

Women wear American flag headscarves at an event in New York City on Feb. 1, 2017.

Muslim Health Care for All

How religious communities in the United States are providing free health care and overcoming anti-immigrant sentiment.

A Burmese Rohingya girl gives a blood sample to test for malaria at a special clinic in Rakhine state on May 4, 2009.

Good Health Supports Good Governance

Trump’s budget reopens old—and unnecessary—arguments about the efficacy of health aid.

People line up to wash their hands with chlorinated water designed to prevent the spread of Ebola at a symbolic polling station in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Dec. 30, 2018.

Cliches Can Kill in Congo

The country’s Ebola outbreak is spreading out of control—but it's not because of a fight over "conflict minerals."

A miner stands on a mound of dirt at an abandoned industrial mine March 28, 2006 in Mongbwalu, Congo. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Your Cell Phone Is Spreading Ebola

A deadly outbreak in Congo has become a global emergency because of a raging conflict over valuable minerals.

A nurse prepares a measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in New York on April 5. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

How Russia Sows Confusion in the U.S. Vaccine Debate

Not content to cause political problems, Moscow’s trolls are also undermining public health.

A nurse administers a measles vaccine to a boy in the school of Lapaivka village near the western Ukrainian city of Lviv on Feb. 21, 2019. (Yuri Dyachyshyn/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s Many Measles Conspiracies Are All the Same

The deadly disease is spreading rapidly around the globe, fueled by a cratering of social trust.

A member of the medical staff of the Ebola Treatment Unit at the Bwera General Hospital in western Uganda on Dec. 12, 2018. (Isaac Kasmani/AFP/Getty Images)

Ebola Has Gotten So Bad, It’s Normal

Africa isn’t just dealing with an outbreak anymore—and that’s bad news for everyone.

Protesters attend an anti-government demonstration in support of abortion rights in Warsaw on April 9, 2016.

Poland Is Trying to Make Abortion Dangerous, Illegal, and Impossible

Ireland voted to liberalize abortion laws. The far-right government in Warsaw is moving in the opposite direction.

A woman wears an air-filtration mask while crossing a street in San Francisco, California, October 13, 2017. (Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

How to Make Climate Change Doubters Pay a Political Price

Leaders who refuse to acknowledge the public health consequences of air pollution, disease outbreaks, and drought will soon feel the wrath of voters at the polls.

Members of the environmental group Greenpeace hold up a sign calling for Australia to allow refugee children to stay in the country in Sydney on February 14, 2016, after a hospital in Brisbane refused to send an asylum-seeker baby back to detention on Nauru.

Australia’s Draconian Refugee Policy Comes Home to Roost

The government has gone to great lengths to keep asylum-seekers from its shores. Now it might have to accept some of them after all.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd United Nations General Assembly in New York City on Sept. 25. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Inside Trump’s Plan to Scale Back U.N. Resolutions on Sexual Health, Violence Against Women

Internal memos reflect the growing influence of conservative Christians in the Trump administration.

Syrian patients receiving treatment in a basement-turned-clinic in the besieged rebel-held town of Douma, on the outskirts of Damascus, on March 16, 2017.

Bashar al-Assad Is Waging Biological War—By Neglect

By deliberately destroying and degrading public health infrastructure, the Syrian regime is reviving long-eradicated diseases and killing civilians.

Three Congolese ride a motorbike and carry a cross for a grave in Mangina, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 23. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the First War Zone Ebola Crisis

The world thought it knew how to deal with Ebola outbreaks—but it’s never dealt with one like this before.

Medical staff check each other's protective suits before entering the isolation unit at a hospital in Bundibugyo, western Uganda, during a suspected case of Ebola. Aug. 17. (Sumy Sadurni /AFP/Getty Images)

The Next Pandemic Will Be Arriving Shortly

Deadly diseases like Ebola and the avian flu are only one flight away. The U.S. government must start taking preparedness seriously.

A doctor examines the X-rays of a tuberculosis patient at a clinic in Brooklyn, New York, on Nov. 27, 2002. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images

You Can’t Treat Tuberculosis With Platitudes

Washington nearly killed the U.N. anti-TB effort, but it didn't need to. The U.N. will do that itself.

A child receives a vaccination shot at a hospital in Huaibei in China's eastern Anhui province on July 26. (AFP/Getty Images)

Parents’ Fears Are the Chinese Communist Party’s Biggest Nightmare

A huge vaccine scandal hits at Beijing's most vulnerable point: children's safety.

A nurse takes care of a terminally ill patient at an HIV/AIDS clinic in Kiev, Ukraine, on July 6, 2010. (SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the Next Deadly AIDS Pandemic

The world thought it had fought the HIV virus to a stalemate—but its strategy was flawed in ways that are only now becoming clear.

Dr. John Fildes walks with President Donald Trump at University Medical Center, October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Trump’s Battle Against Breastfeeding Is a Small Part of a Wider War

With escalating drug prices and growing vaccine paranoia, American populism is taking down the edifice of global public health.

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

Who Will Care for the Carers?

As populations age, countries will need ever more primary health workers and aides — jobs robots will never do well. So why do we treat these workers so badly?

Denis Pierard, a specialist in microbiology and virology in Brussels, holds up a dish of bacteria culture in a microbiology lab on August 13, 2010. The researcher was studying the death of a Belgian man killed by a drug-resistant superbug that originated in South Asia. (Benoit Doppagne/AFP/Getty Images)

Superbugs Are Going to Eat Us Alive

Drug-resistant diseases are on the rise. Only a global effort to prevent overuse of antibiotics can halt the threat.

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