Public Health

A protester holds a sign  during a protest against corruption and hunger amid the coronavirus pandemic outside the presidential palace in Panama City, on June 25.

Latin America’s Wave of Protests Was Historic—Then the Pandemic Arrived

The coronavirus and lockdowns have worsened the region’s economic divides—and set the stage for more political upheaval.

A resident of the Aglomerado da Serra Favela, carries food supplies on June 4, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

For Brazil’s Poor, the Pandemic Is Far From Over

As coronavirus cases there exceed 1 million, the country’s poorest are struggling to access medical care.

Mobile hospital staff wearing personal protective equipment perform COVID-19 nasal and throat swab testing  on April 28, 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand.

Coronavirus Cases Are Rising Globally—and Poor Countries Are Worst Off

Experts have long said extensive testing is the key to mitigating the pandemic. But an analysis of testing data shows low-income countries have few resources.

Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Anthony Fauci and others arrive for the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus in the White House in Washington on April 22.

The United States Will Learn Nothing From the Pandemic

It’s the country’s biggest crisis in decades—and all signs suggest Americans will absorb all the wrong lessons from it.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the daily briefing of the White House Coronavirus Task Force in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on April 14.

Trump Scapegoats China and WHO—and Americans Will Suffer

The White House’s official narrative about the pandemic is contradicted by the facts—and creates new obstacles to stopping the virus.

U.S. President Donald Trump looks at reporters asking questions as he returns to the Oval Office after delivering a statement on China at the White House May 29, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Trump Cuts U.S. Ties With World Health Organization Amid Pandemic

Democrats and NGOs slammed the White House decision, saying the U.S. president was ceding influence to China and further undercutting the coronavirus response.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, at a press briefing at the organization's headquarters in Geneva on March 11.

Yes, Blame WHO for Its Disastrous Coronavirus Response

A step-by-step reconstruction of events reveals a long series of mistakes and missteps.

Economic stimulus checks are prepared for printing.

Why the White House Should Propose More Economic Stimulus

While a wait-and-see approach is usually wise, unusual times require unusual playbooks, writes a former Trump administration economic advisor.

Wilcannia Coronavirus Street Sign

Indigenous Australians Avert an Outbreak—for Now

When the coronavirus arrived, aboriginal communities sprang into action long before the government. But in light of a neglected health system, can their tenuous successes be maintained?

People displaced by drought walking at a displaced persons camp.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Southeast Asia is turning a blind eye to the Rohingya, Israel-Jordan relations are deteriorating, and Kataib Hezbollah is losing influence in Iraq.

Medical personnel move a deceased patient to a refrigerated truck serving as a makeshift morgue at Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City on April 9.

Stop Blaming Trump—the U.S. Coronavirus Health Care Crisis Runs So Much Deeper

In the U.S. health care system, failure is institutionalized. Getting rid of Trump in November would not solve the problem.

Pregnant women sit as they wait for their turn at a coronavirus testing center

Family Planning Efforts Upended by the Coronavirus

In India and around the world, community health workers are being rerouted to deal with the pandemic—with dangerous results.

Demonstrators hold up a giant doggie biscuit reading "corruption" during a rally in support of the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala City on Jan. 12, 2019.

We Can’t Stop the Coronavirus Unless We Stop Corruption

The world is pouring trillions of dollars into coronavirus vaccines and economic stimulus efforts. But without strict measures, graft will prevent funds from reaching the right recipients.

Students walk in a Mogadishu neighborhood wearing face masks as a protective measure against the coronavirus in Somalia on March 19.

‘We Are Used to a Virus Called Bombs’

The coronavirus will ravage a resilient Somalia—with ripples far beyond its borders.

Beds are lined up in a tent as volunteers from the international Christian relief organization Samaritan's Purse set up an emergency field hospital for patients with the coronavirus in Central Park in New York on March 30.

Why the U.S. Health Care System Failed the Coronavirus Test

America needs a medical microgrid focused on treating patients where they are. Without locally focused care, doctors will continue to fail those who need them most.

A man holds a smartphone showing a coronavirus tracking and tracing app launched by the Norwegian government, in Oslo on April 17.

Countries Rolling Out Coronavirus Tracking Apps Show Why They Can’t Work

If you think tracking apps will keep people safe as economies reopen, look to South Korea, Singapore, and Australia to see why you’re mistaken.

U.S. President Donald Trump signs a document reinstating sanctions against Iran after announcing the U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal in Washington on May 8, 2018.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Iran is resuming its enrichment of uranium, Syrian mercenaries are in Libya, and the Taliban are exploiting the coronavirus.

Taliban militants and villagers attend a gathering as they celebrate the U.S.-Afghan peace deal in Laghman province, Afghanistan, on March 2.

For the Taliban, the Pandemic Is a Ladder

The Islamist group is using the coronavirus crisis for propaganda—with potentially dire consequences for those living under its control.

A participant stands near a screen during the ethical hacking contest Insomni'hack in Geneva on March 21, 2014.

Want to Avoid the Next Pandemic? Hire a Devil’s Advocate.

Forcing governments and businesses to institutionalize doubt—by putting hackers and red teams on the payroll—would stop groupthink and could prevent catastrophes.