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A picture taken on June 5, 2017 shows a man walking past the Qatar Airways branch in the Saudi capital Riyadh, after it had suspended all flights to Saudi Arabia following a severing of relations between major gulf states and gas-rich Qatar. Arab nations including Saudi Arabia and Egypt cut ties with Qatar accusing it of supporting extremism, in the biggest diplomatic crisis to hit the region in years. / AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE        (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

A Field Trip to the Front Lines of the Qatar-Saudi Cold War

The showdown in the Gulf shows no signs of ending. And there don’t seem to be any clear winners emerging.

CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01:  A youth waves Egyptian flags from a lamp post in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo.  (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Egypt Cracks Down, Again

Rainbow flags, political challengers, and citizenship laws are all in Cairo’s crosshairs.

THAINKHALI, BANGLADESH - SEPTEMBER 25: Mayina Khatun, 80, suffers from depression and fatigue from her difficult journey from Myanmar one week ago September 25, 2017 in Thainkhali camp, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Over 429,000 Rohingya refugees have fled into Bangladesh since late August during the outbreak of violence in Rakhine state as Myanmar's de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi downplayed the crisis during a speech in Myanmar this week faces and defended the security forces while criticism on her handling of the Rohingya crisis grows. Bangladesh's prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, spoke at the United Nations General Assembly last week, focusing on the humanitarian challenges of hosting the minority Muslim group who currently lack food, medical services, and toilets, while new satellite images from Myanmar's Rakhine state continue to show smoke rising from Rohingya villages.  (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

The Rohingya Are the New Palestinians

The plight of the Rohingya is a rare moment of global unity for Muslim countries. But will that be enough to save them?

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The Iranian Cyberthreat Is Real

As Trump increasingly boxes in Tehran, U.S. allies should be worried about the potential for a devastating cyberattack from the Islamic Republic.

Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry (R) looks at UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan during a joint press conference with their Saudi and Bahraini counterparts, after their meeting in the Egyptian capital Cairo on July 5, 2017, discussing the Gulf diplomatic crisis with Qatar, as Doha called for dialogue to resolve the dispute.
The Saudi foreign ministry said on July 5, 2017 that it had received Qatar's response to a 13-point list of demands issued on June 22 -- which include Doha ending support for the Muslim Brotherhood and closing broadcaster Al-Jazeera -- and would respond "at the right time". / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Khaled ELFIQI        (Photo credit should read KHALED ELFIQI/AFP/Getty Images)

New UAE Documentary Claims Qatar Complicit in 9/11 Attacks

Dueling PR campaigns just reached a whole new level in the ongoing Gulf crisis.

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Can Trump Find a Better Deal Than the U.S. Air Base in Qatar?

It costs more to maintain the Pentagon’s military bands than to operate the al Udeid base.

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Rex Tillerson (Finally) Goes On the Record

A rare on-the-record interview gives a glimpse into the mind of America’s quietest diplomat-in-chief.

<> on October 24, 2011 in Doha, Qatar.

Qatar Pulls the Human Rights Card in Washington PR Blitz

Doha argues its citizens are suffering as a result of the three-country blockade

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Tillerson Tries Hand at Shuttle Diplomacy to End Gulf Feud

The secretary of state will spend this week shoring up Kuwaiti efforts to end the GCC-Qatar showdown.

The emir of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani speaks during a press conference following a summit on the post-Kadhafi held at the Elysee Palace in Paris on September 1, 2011. France hosts a "Friends of Libya" conference to allow states that stood by during the uprising that ousted Moamer Kadhafi to belatedly back Tripoli's fledgling revolutionary regime. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURE (Photo credit should read LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images)

The Palace Intrigue at the Heart of the Qatar Crisis

The Saudis don’t believe the young emir of Qatar is really running the country — and they’re looking for regime change.

On this episode of The E.R., the Panel joins forces with Lawfare to have a conversation with Bob Bauer and A.B. Culvahouse.

The Showdown in the Gulf Gets Nasty

Saudi Arabia and its Arab allies have given Qatar until Monday to comply with a list of demands that are unreasonable at best. So where does it go from here?

(From L to R) Kuwait's Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Khaled al-Sabah, Qatar's Foreign Minister Mohammed bin Abdulrahman bin Jassim al-Thani, Oman's Foreign Minister Yusuf bin Alawi, Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, Bahrain's Foreign Minister Khalid bin Ahmed al-Khalifa, UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash and GCC Secretary General Abdul Latif Bin Rashid al-Zayani pose for a group picture  during a meeting of the Gulf foreign ministers in the Saudi capital Riyadh, on May 17, 2017, a few days ahead of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) summit.
The summit will be one of three forums held during a visit by US President Donald Trump, who is making Saudi Arabia his first overseas stop since assuming office in January. / AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE        (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

There’s No Space for Qatar to Save Face

As the crisis in the Gulf heats up, the impossible demands made by the Saudis and Emiratis virtually ensure that things will get ugly.

US President Donald Trump (R) and Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani take part in a bilateral meeting at a hotel in Riyadh on May 21, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN        (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time for the Trump Administration to Step Up in the Qatar Crisis

There’s leverage to be had and U.S. national security interests at stake. But if the United States doesn’t act now, things could get a whole lot worse.

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Corker: No More U.S. Arms Sales to Gulf Until Qatar Crisis Solved

Sen. Bob Corker has no qualms playing bad cop as Tillerson works to salvage Gulf relations from a bitter Qatar feud.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover