Race and Ethnicity

Christina Oh and Lee Isaac Chung of "Minari"

Asian Americans Belong, but Sometimes It’s Hard for Us to Believe It

Oscar-nominated “Minari” is about flowering in the United States—with the aid of our elders.

People protest against anti-Asian violence.

We Don’t Have the Words to Fight Anti-Asian Racism

Tangled questions of Asian identity need answers that aren’t defined by U.S. terminology alone.

A woman wearing a face mask holds a sign during a rally to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence near Chinatown in Los Angeles, California, on Feb. 20.

Young People in China Are Losing Faith in the West

And that spells trouble for liberal democracy and Beijing’s relations with Washington.

George Floyd mural unveiled in Brooklyn.

As America Seeks Racial Justice, It Can Learn From Abroad

Other countries offer good lessons for acknowledging and redressing past wrongs.

Protesters hold the image of a victim of racist attacks.

Anti-Asian Attacks Are Blighting the United States

Policymakers and analysts have a duty to speak out for a vulnerable community.

Migrants in a dinghy navigate in the English Channel toward the south coast of England after crossing from France, on Sept. 1, 2020.

Britain Doesn’t Have a Refugee Crisis, So It Created One

Boris Johnson and Priti Patel have unnecessarily warehoused and endangered thousands of asylum-seekers in an effort to pander to the right-wing press.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken holds his first press briefing at the State Department in Washington, on Jan 27.

How to Do Diversity Reforms Right

Decades of attempts to remodel the State Department haven’t worked—here’s why and how to do better this time.

Members of AIDS activist group ACT UP hold up signs of George W. Bush, Ronald Reagan, Nancy Reagan, and Jesse Helms along with a banner stating “Silence Equals Death” as they protest at the headquarters of the Food and Drug Administration in Rockville, Maryland, on Oct. 11, 1988.

U.S. Leaders Forgot the Lessons of the AIDS Crisis by Not Doing the Reading

Literature’s power to illuminate otherness makes it critical to leadership.

A man hangs a Burundian flag on the lead bus transporting repatriated refugees arriving at the Gisuru border crossing on Oct. 3, 2019 in Ruyigi, Burundi.

Kicking Refugees Out Makes Everyone Less Safe

Tanzania is pushing Burundian refugees out—and endangering the region’s stability.

Ethiopian soldiers stand with children behind them

How to Stop Ethnic Nationalism From Tearing Ethiopia Apart

The 1994 Ethiopian Constitution celebrated self-determination, but it laid the groundwork for today’s violence. Devolution could offer a way out.

Supporters of President Donald Trump storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally in Washington on Jan. 6.

The United States’ Demographic Revolution Doesn’t Need to Be Destabilizing

But to avoid collapse like the Soviet Union, inclusivity must begin now.

Roses rest on the ground between Stolpersteine, brass stumbling blocks for victims of the Holocaust, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Kristallnacht pogroms in Berlin on Nov. 9, 2013.

Germany’s Lessons on Confronting a Racist Past

Philosopher Susan Neiman explains what the United States can learn from postwar Germany.

A volunteer prays alone in a prayer hall with signs on the carpet enforcing social distancing at Madina Masjid in Sheffield on July 24, 2020.

Defining Islamophobia Is the First Step Toward Addressing It

In the United Kingdom, Islamophobia is on the rise, but existing anti-racist measures are not equipped to deal with it.

The Wave sculpture by Wren Miller commissioned to launch Brita’s sustainability campaign is on display in London on June 15, 2016.

How to Keep Activist CEOs Honest

New sustainable finance regulations in Europe will raise the bar for green investment.

Nelson Mandela visits Hlengiwe School in Johannesburg on May 1, 1993.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration doesn’t have to reinvent the wheel—it can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

A noose is seen on makeshift gallows as supporters of US President Donald Trump gather before the attack on the US Capitol in Washington DC on Jan. 6, 2021.

Political Scientists Turned a Blind Eye to America’s Democratic Failures

A state built on Black repression and local violence was smugly coded as a mature democracy.

A supporter of U.S. President Donald Trump holds a Confederate flag outside the Senate Chamber after breaching the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

Washington Must Treat White Supremacist Terrorism as a Transnational Threat

After the Capitol attack, the U.S. government needs to recognize racist extremists as a national security risk and create a high-level counterterrorism czar to disrupt their financing and dismantle their networks.

human-rights-truth-commission-foreign-policy-50-years-noma-bar-illustration-HP

Foreign Policy Begins at Home

The best way for Biden and Harris to build better partnerships abroad is to get America’s own house in order—and that begins with human rights.

Trump supporters try to storm the U.S. Capitol

White Supremacy Created the Capitol Assault

The Trojan horse of racism put democracy’s enemies inside its walls.

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump storm the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6.

Our Top Weekend Reads

An opportunity for Biden, populism’s online fires, and the need for transitional justice.