Race/Ethnicity

ForeignPolicy__Caste2

Feeling Like an Outcast

The bestselling book “Caste” brilliantly frames racial hierarchies in the United States but largely ignores the horrors of India’s caste structure.

Passersby walk under a surveillance camera that is part of a facial recognition technology test at Berlin Südkreuz station in Berlin on Aug. 3, 2017.

Defunding the Police Might Leave Americans More Surveilled and Less Secure

Technology in policing might appear more benign than rogue cops or racist judges, but a look at global trends gives pause.

An art enthusiast paints  the face of U.S. vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris outside a drawing school in Mumbai on Aug. 13.

Kamala Harris Is a Soft-Power Boon for America’s Global Image

The vice presidential candidate’s foreign-policy takes are conventional, but her identity is transformational.

Russian Police Violence

The Curious Case of ‘Russian Lives Matter’

In Moscow, the Kremlin attacks U.S. racism while the liberal opposition ignores it, or worse.

A displaced Syrian woman

Guilt by Location

Around the world, security forces use forced displacement as a means of sorting populations. To fix the global displacement crisis, it’s critical to understand how and why they do it.

People walk down 16th Street in Washington after volunteers painted "Black Lives Matter" on the street near the White House on June 5.

Seeing Race In a Pandemic

How the physical environment affects our experience of difference.

Members of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest neo-Nazi groups in the United States

Trump Wants to Label Antifa a Terrorist Organization. What About the KKK?

For more than a century, white supremacy groups have wreaked incalculable devastation against Black Americans.

Demonstrators hold signs as they take part in a Juneteenth march and rally in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on June 19.

America’s Identity Crisis

Race and reconciliation lessons from a Black international peace builder

diversity-state-department-black-lives-matter-diplomacy-illustration-

Fighting for U.S. Values Abroad, Black Diplomats Struggle With Challenges at Home

Protests against racism are shedding light on a silent morale crisis within parts of America’s diplomatic corps.

A Muslim man walks inside a burned house in a riot-affected area in New Delhi on March 1, 2020, after violence broke out in India's capital.

In Delhi, First Came the Pogroms. Then Came Coronavirus.

For Indian Muslims forced from their homes by mob violence, not even displaced persons camps can protect them now.

Nick Timothy (L), waits at haulage and logistics company Davies Transport during British Prime Minister Theresa May's visit on May 12, 2017 in Darlington, United Kingdom.

Putting Lipstick on a Bigotry

Former British Prime Minister Theresa May’s top advisor wants to remake conservatism. Instead he’s written a rousing defense of Little England xenophobia.

A street vendor sits next to banners of the presidential candidate for the National Unity and Alliance for Change party (APNU+AFC) David Granger, in Georgetown, Guyana, on March 1, 2020.

Ethnic Conflict Threatens Democracy in Guyana

The country’s simmering ethnic tensions threaten to undermine a fragile democratic system and bring on the resource curse before the proceeds from massive offshore oil discoveries arrive.

The U.S. Department of State

State Department Struggling on Diversity, New Report Finds

The most comprehensive study to date shows that State has in some ways become less diverse than it was in 2002.

Women look on as they stand on a roadside during a demonstration near the Jamia Millia Islamia university, that has been blocked off by demonstrators against India's new citizenship law, in New Delhi, India, on Jan. 24, 2020.

India’s Muslims Are Fighting for Their Religion. Should They Display It, Too?

As secular Indians protest a controversial new citizenship law, some debate whether they should demonstrate as Muslims first or as Indians who happen to be Muslim.

Ethiopia's Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Abiy Ahmed (R) and his wife, Zinash Tayachew, wave to the crowd from the balcony of the Grand Hotel in Oslo on Dec. 10, 2019

Will Abiy Ahmed’s Bet on Ethiopia’s Political Future Pay Off?

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning prime minister has disbanded Africa’s largest political party in an effort to reinvent the country’s politics—but some powerful players stand to lose, and they won’t go quietly.

Jawar Mohammed, a member of the Oromo ethnic group who has been a public critic of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, addresses supporters outside his home in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on Oct. 24, a day after his supporters took to the streets, burning tires and blocking roads following rumors of Jawar's mistreatment by security forces.

Ethiopia Will Explode if It Doesn’t Move Beyond Ethnic-Based Politics

Oromo nationalism helped bring Abiy Ahmed to power, but it could also be his undoing. To hold the country together, the Nobel-winning prime minister needs to convince various ethnic groups that he and his new party represent all Ethiopians.

People gather to celebrate the return of the formerly banned anti-government group the Oromo Liberation Front at Mesquel Square in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on Sept. 15, 2018.

Don’t Let Ethiopia Become the Next Yugoslavia

Federations of ethnonational states can become explosive during moments of political liberalization. Abiy Ahmed must tread carefully to avoid a Balkan nightmare.