refugees

Afghan refugees arrive at a U.N.-run repatriation center in Torkham, Afghanistan on Oct. 31, 2016.

For Afghan Refugees, Pakistan Is a Nightmare—but Also Home

Host to one of the world’s largest refugee populations, the country is trying to figure out how to push migrants out. But that will mean sending many Afghans back to a country they’ve never lived in.

Abdelkhaleq Jouloud sits with his family in their tent at a camp for displaced people in Hammam al-Alil, south of the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, on Nov. 12, 2018.

Among Displaced Iraqis, One Group Is Worse Off Than the Rest

Internal refugees with perceived ties to the Islamic State suffer abuse and sexual exploitation in camps.

Rohingya refugees shout slogans at a protest against a disputed repatriation program at the Unchiprang refugee camp near Teknaf on Nov. 15, 2018. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

U.N. Bureaucrats Just Want the Rohingya Off Their Plate

Dumping refugees on a doomed island in Bangladesh is as callous as it is predictable.

An Afghan refugee stands in the sun with her daughter in the coastal town of Cesme, Turkey, on Dec. 4, 2015. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

For Afghan Refugee Women, There’s No Escape From Violence

Thousands of women have set off on their own for Turkey, but harassment from Afghan men often follows them to their new country.

Drivers wait in line at the Jaber-Nasib crossing between Jordan and Syria on Jan. 16. (Laith Joneidi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Syria’s Refugees Begin Their Journey Home

Thanks to a newly opened border crossing with Jordan, migrants are heading back to their country. But their ordeal is far from over.

Workers clean the beach of the coastal town of Zouk Mosbeh, north of Beirut, on Jan. 23, 2018, as garbage washed ashore after stormy weather. (Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Facing an Economic and Environmental Disaster

Rather than rushing to punish Hezbollah, the United States should be shoring up the country’s new government to avoid state collapse.

Migrants camp on the road in the vicinity of the Maljevac border crossing with neighboring Croatia, near the northern Bosnian town of Velika Kladusa, on Oct. 24, 2018. (Elvis Barukcic/AFP/Getty Images)

In Bosnia, a Migrant Way Station Is Becoming a Winter Prison

For years, the country remained untouched by the global migrant crisis, but now, even in a place where many people were once refugees, tensions are on the rise.

A woman carries a pot of water on her head in Rann in north-east of Nigeria close to the Cameroonian border on July 29, 2017.

Cameroon Used to Welcome Refugees. Now It Forcibly Expels Them.

Nigerians fleeing violence at home are being kicked out of northern Cameroon and being sent back to areas terrorized by Boko Haram.

Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as La Bestia in Las Patronas, Veracruz state, Mexico, to travel through Mexico to reach the United States on Aug. 9, 2018. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Isn’t Helping Refugees. It’s Depriving Them of Their Rights.

The humanitarian visas offered to migrants don’t allow them to work, study, or receive benefits while letting the Mexican government duck its responsibilities under international law.

An election campaign poster bearing a portrait of President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus on May 18, 2014. (Louai Bashara/AFP/Getty Images)

A Deadly Welcome Awaits Syria’s Returning Refugees

As the war in Syria dies down, the torture and mistreatment of returnees are ramping up.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte (R) shakes hands with Curacao Prime Minister Eugen Rhuggenaarh (L) ahead of a meeting in The Hague on June 30, 2017.

For Venezuelan Refugees, There’s No Safe Haven in Curacao

The former Dutch colony in the Carribean is a member of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. But when it comes to refugees, there’s little help from The Hague.

Syrian refugees, stuck between the Jordanian and Syrian borders, wait to cross into Jordan at the Hadalat border crossing on Jan. 14, 2016. (Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

Investing in Low-Wage Jobs Is the Wrong Way to Reduce Migration

Unless would-be migrants can build lives with dignity—which poorly paid, export-oriented jobs do not provide—they will continue to seek ways to move on.

Hakeem al-Araibi, a former Bahrain national team soccer player with refugee status in Australia, is escorted by immigration police to a court in Bangkok on Dec. 11, 2018.

FIFA Cares About Cash, Not Players

By allowing a refugee soccer player to remain stranded in Thailand, soccer’s governing body is scoring another own goal.

A Venezuelan family at the Simon Bolivar International Bridge in the Colombian border city of Cucuta on January 10. (Schneyder Mendoza/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s Why Colombia Opened Its Arms to Venezuelan Migrants—Until Now

For years, Colombians fleeing violence left for Venezuela. Now mass migration flows the other way.

Zain (Zain Al Rafeea), right, cares for Rahil’s son, Yonas (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole), after 
Rahil is detained in Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum. (Fares Sokhon/Sony Pictures Classics)

Broke in Beirut

In Capernaum, Nadine Labaki finds a new way for film to deal with poverty.

2018-books-lead

The Books We Read in 2018

Some of Foreign Policy’s favorite reads of the year.

Herto Hamrash Minut, 74, sits outside his house on Sinjar Mountain, where he lives with his two wives and 12 children. Four years ago, he was kidnapped and tortured by the Islamic State for eight months. (Sam Mednick for Foreign Policy)

ISIS May Be Gone, But Iraq’s Yazidis Are Still Suffering

The defeat of the Islamic State has created a power vacuum in the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar, leaving the Yazidi minority at the mercy of competing militias.

Lillian Ochan, a 23-year-old refugee from Ethiopia, buys food items using bamba chakula cash from a shop in Kenya’s Kalobeyei settlement, village 2, in Kakuma on May 21. (World Food Programme/Martin Karimi)

Refuge, Reformed

Kenya has found a way to make refugee camps benefit host communities. Other countries should follow its lead.

Members of the environmental group Greenpeace hold up a sign calling for Australia to allow refugee children to stay in the country in Sydney on February 14, 2016, after a hospital in Brisbane refused to send an asylum-seeker baby back to detention on Nauru.

Australia’s Draconian Refugee Policy Comes Home to Roost

The government has gone to great lengths to keep asylum-seekers from its shores. Now it might have to accept some of them after all.

Ethnic Uigur women look through a security fence as Chinese soldiers stand guard in Urumqi, in China's far west Xinjiang region, on July 9, 2009. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

For Them, Afghanistan Is Safer Than China

Persecution in Xinjiang is pushing Uighurs over the border.

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