Review

Jonathan Bartlett illustration for Foreign Policy

Can American Values Survive in a Chinese World?

A new book looks at the China challenge for the United States—and China itself.

Susan Rice, former U.S. national security advisor, and Samantha Power, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

The Women Who Shaped Obama’s Foreign Policy

Two new memoirs by Samantha Power and Susan Rice show how idealists became insiders—and what was lost along the way.

A protester with a sticker on his head reading "Vox Now" in reference to the Spanish far-right party Vox takes part in a demonstration in Madrid on Feb. 10.

Digging Up a Dictator Won’t End Spain’s Divisions

The Spanish government just moved a step closer to disinterring the remains of Francisco Franco. But as the country heads for yet another election, a new book shows that voters have other priorities.

Israel G. Vargas illustration for Foreign Policy/Netflix/Amazon

The Great Indian Streaming Wars

The battle over the country’s future is being waged one TV screen—and smartphone—at a time.

The Hungarian-born author Arthur Koestler, best known for his novel "Darkness At Noon," at his home in Alpbach, Austria.

‘Darkness at Noon’ Revisited

A new translation of Arthur Koestler’s classic dystopian novel reveals what’s relevant to our age—and what isn’t.

Frames of Chinese President Xi Jinping, US President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin are display in a photo shop in Beijing on April 17, 2017.

Democracy Is Fighting for Its Life

Around the world, political freedom isn’t just slipping away—it’s getting dragged down by fervent enemies.

TOPSHOT-FRANCE-EU-POLITICS-ELECTIONS

Europe’s Ever Closer Confusion

A newly translated novel portrays the European Union’s search for meaning as a historical reckoning—and a comedy of manners.

1_Review_Babones_Driverless-vehicles-Irena-Gajic

Who Will Win the Self-Driving Future?

China and the United States have drastically different visions for autonomous transportation.

Richard Holbrooke stands next to U.S. General Stanlely McChrystal, head of the U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, before the arrival of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Nov. 18, 2009  in Kabul, Afghanistan.

The Heart and Hypocrisy of the American Empire

Richard Holbrooke was a symbol of his country’s promise as a superpower—and its decline.

Female Palestinian shepherds complain to an Israeli soldier after Israeli settlers harassed them and their sheep near the village of Umm el-Kheir in the southern hills of the West Bank near Hebron on January 25, 2014.

The False Promise of Protest

David Shulman’s diaries of resisting the Israeli occupation show the limits of activism in the face of rampant dispossession and despair.

An Indian police commando stands guard in front of the Taj Mahal Palace hotel in Mumbai on November 25, 2010, ahead of the second anniversary of the November 26, 2008 Mumbai attacks. (Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Not as Safe as You Think It Is

Hotel Mumbai is a tale of courage. It is also a worrying reminder of India’s security flaws.

Odette Sansom served as a courier spy in Britain’s Special Operations Executive during World War II. (PA Images via Getty Images)

Writing Women at War

A slate of new releases reexamine gender in conflict.

Director Jia Zhangke speaks at the New York Film Festival on Sept. 30, 2018. (Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images)

Inside Man

Jia Zhangke’s "Ash Is Purest White," socially critical yet officially sanctioned, strikes a middle path for Chinese cinema.

From left to right: Marco Graf as Pepe, Daniela Demesa as Sofi, Yalitza Aparicio as Cleo, Marina De Tavira as Sofía, Diego Cortina Autrey as Toño, and Carlos Peralta Jacobson as Paco in "Roma," written and directed by Alfonso Cuarón. (Carlos Somonte via Netflix)

‘Roma’ Is a Gorgeous Homage to Domestic Oppression

Alfonso Cuarón’s masterpiece may be Oscar worthy, but it fails to address the problems of Latin American households.

Yahya Sinwar (C-R), the leader of Hamas in the Gaza Strip and Ismail Haniyeh (C-L), the senior leader of the movement's political bureau, attend the funeral of a Hamas official in Gaza City on March 25, 2017.

Can Israel’s Iron Wall Contain Hamas?

Benjamin Netanyahu’s government has tried to keep the Islamist group in check, but the situation in Gaza is as unstable as ever.

Zain (Zain Al Rafeea), right, cares for Rahil’s son, Yonas (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole), after 
Rahil is detained in Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum. (Fares Sokhon/Sony Pictures Classics)

Broke in Beirut

In Capernaum, Nadine Labaki finds a new way for film to deal with poverty.

In Chinese Parents, the player struggles with the challenges of raising a kid in modern China. (Coconut Island Games)

Press ‘A’ to Study Harder

A new video game captures the anxiety of Chinese parenting.

Bertolt Brecht in 1937. (Fred Stein/Picture-Alliance/dpa/Associated Press)

Poetry for the Masses

1,200 newly translated poems from Bertolt Brecht offer an unexpected survival guide for difficult times.

People carry German flags and a banner which reads "Stop Islamization" during a march organized by the far-right AfD party in Rostock,  Germany on September 22, 2018.

Germany’s New Politics of Cultural Despair

Will the return of the European far-right be the undoing of the West?

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin shakes hands with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at the start of the second trilateral meeting with U.S. President Jimmy Carter at Camp David on Sept. 7, 1978. The talks led to the Camp David Accords.(Bettmann Archives via Getty Images)

Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

A new diplomatic history argues that the United States, Egypt, and Israel prevented a Palestinian state from emerging. But leaders such as Yasser Arafat bear much of the blame.

Rescue workers carry a body on Aug. 9, 1998, in the aftermath of a bombing two days earlier that targeted the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. (AFP/Getty Images)

A Story of Leadership and Fatal Missed Opportunity

A review of Prudence Bushnell’s new book on the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings.

Kotryna Zukauskaite illustration for Foreign Policy

Germany’s Return of the Repressed 

The country’s far-right wants to revive ethnic nationalism. The left must come up with its own alternative.

Gen. Charles de Gaulle leads a triumphant procession down Champs-Élysées as part of the celebration of the liberation of Paris. To the right of de Gaulle is Gen. Jacques-Philippe Leclerc, commander of the French Armored Division. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

The European Union Needs Its Own Charles de Gaulle

There’s nothing wrong with today’s EU that France’s legendary 20th-century leader didn’t see coming—and didn’t try to fix when he had the chance.

Andrea Ucini illustration for Foreign Policy

Les Monstres Among Us

Two French best-sellers draw warnings for the present from the stories of Hitler’s henchmen.

Lior Raz, right, and Doron Ben-David play undercover Israeli operatives in Fauda, now available on Netflix. (Netflix)

The Occupation as Entertainment

The second season of the acclaimed TV thriller “Fauda” obscures the dark realities of Israeli rule in the West Bank.

President Barack Obama meets with Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications Denis McDonough and speechwriter Ben Rhodes on Air Force One on June 4, 2009 on route to Cairo, Egypt. (Pete Souza/The White House via Getty Images)

Ben Rhodes Led From Behind in Life

The Obama staffer's memoirs depict an administration that wanted to change history, but never got past managing crises.

A scene from "Babylon Berlin," now streaming on Netflix. (Beta Film)

German TV Is Sanitizing History

A new wave of historical dramas is telling the wrong stories about the country’s past.

Chris Gash illustration for Foreign Policy

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.

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