Revolution

A member of the Bolivarian National Police Special Forces Group holds his gun during an operation against criminal groups in the Petare neighborhood of Caracas on Jan. 25.

Venezuela Is Armed to the Hilt

The country has assembled one of the largest stockpiles of weapons in the Western Hemisphere. Here’s how to prevent it from falling into the wrong hands.

Forces loyal to President Nicolás Maduro confront supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó in Caracas on April 30.

Guaidó’s Make or Break Moment

Calling for the final phase of the revolution was the Venezuelan opposition leader’s boldest move yet, and the outcome will show whether his protest still has legs.

Juan Guaidó talks to media outside La Carlota Air Base in Caracas on April 30.

Juan Guaidó Calls Venezuelans to the Streets

A transcript of the opposition leader’s remarks from La Carlota Air Base.

Omar al-Bashir appears during a rally with his supporters in the Green Square in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Sharaf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

It Takes a Village to Make a Monster

Omar al-Bashir is gone—but he was never the key to Sudan’s oppression to begin with.

Thailand’s “Red Shirts,” a group that began in support of Thaksin Shinawatra and against the military government, protest in Bangkok on March 31. (Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)

Thailand’s Groundhog Day

The recent election replayed a similar vote from 1992. And if the historical precedent is any guide, Thai politics are about to get even messier.

Students demonstrate in Algiers, Algeria on March 12, 2019, one day after President Abdelaziz Bouteflika announced his withdrawal from a bid to win another term in office. (Ryad Kramdi/AFP/Getty Images)

Don’t Get Your Hopes Up About Algeria

The Middle East’s latest protests seem like the Arab Spring all over again. That’s no reason for optimism.

Motorcyclists ride past graffiti depicting late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and current President Nicolás Maduro in Caracas on Feb. 27. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s Good for Maduro Is Bad for Chavismo

The more atrocities Venezuela’s dictator commits, the less likely his regime is to survive him.

Haleh Esfandiari speaks during a press conference in Washington on Sept. 10, 2007. (Stephanie Kuykendal/Getty Images)

Transformation in Iran Will Come From Women

On the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, a former political prisoner assesses the prospect of change in Iran.

Nikol Pashinyan casting his ballot during early parliamentary elections in Yerevan on Dec. 9, 2018. (Karen Minasayan/ AFP/Getty Images)

Armenia’s Revolution Will Not be Monopolized

An Armenian protest leader just secured the office of prime minister by a landslide—but, thanks to his own efforts, he’ll still face plenty of opposition.

Supporters of Nikol Pashinyan celebrate his election as prime minister of Armenia in Yerevan’s Republic Square on May 8. (Sergei Gapon/AFP/Getty Images)

Armenia’s Democratic Dreams

The country’s Velvet Revolution took its cues from democratic movements in Latin America rather than from other revolutions in the post-Soviet world. Here’s why that’s a good thing.

A Maoist state-level conference in a Jharkhand forest in 2010. (Alpa Shah)

India’s Aging Guerrillas Still Believe in the Struggle

As India’s police conjure up the specter of urban Maoist terror, the real insurgency remains deep in the jungle.

People celebrate Armenian prime minister Serzh Sarkisian's resignation in downtown Yerevan on April 23, 2018. (VANO SHLAMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Sometimes Armenian Protests Are Just Armenian Protests

Not every post-Soviet revolution is about the geopolitics of Russia.

Emmanuel Macron with students during the inauguration of an apprentice training centre in Tours on March 14, 2018.  (BENOIT TESSIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Everyone in France Wants to Claim the Legacy of 1968

Leftists want to celebrate revolutionary idealism; conservatives, the triumph of traditional authority. And Emmanuel Macron is trying to split the difference.

Protests against planned pension reforms in Athens on Feb. 12, 2016. (Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)

Never Mind the Troika, Here’s Rouvikonas

Greece’s prolonged austerity has given rise to a movement of middle-class anarchism.

Iranian students scuffle with police at the University of Tehran on Dec. 30, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Can Help Iran’s Protesters By Rejecting His Own Iran Policies

The first steps have to be international diplomacy, and lifting the travel ban.

An Iranian woman raises her fist amidst the smoke of tear gas at the University of Tehran during a protest in Tehran on Dec. 30, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Iranians Are Mad as Hell About Their Foreign Policy

Tehran's adventures abroad have triggered anger at home. Here's how American foreign policy can step up.

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PIERRE CELERIER  (FILES) -- In a file picture taken in January 1979, Iranian protestors hold a up a poster of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini during a demonstration in Tehran against the Shah. Iran will begin 10 days of celebrations on February 1, 2009, marking the 30th anniversary of the return of the exiled Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and the revolution which toppled the US-backed shah.  (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)

What Erdogan and Khomeini Have in Common

The Turkish president’s post-coup crackdowns are following in the footsteps of Iran’s Islamic revolution.

(FILES) A picture taken in Moscow on August 20, 1991 shows a group of Yeltsin supporters, including a Soviet colonel with the Russian flag, walking towards the Russian Parliament, as thousands of Muscovites are gathering around the building to support President of Russian Federation Boris Yeltsin to protest against the toppling of Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev by communist hardliners early on August 19. AFP PHOTO / MICHAEL EVSTAFIEV        (Photo credit should read )

Even Vladimir Putin Cannot Kill the Russian Revolution

Twenty-five years after the great revolution that toppled the Soviet regime, the spirit of dignity and freedom still burns.

Indian schoolchildren wait in line for their mid-day meal at a government primary school in the outskirts of Hyderabad on June 13, 2011, on the opening day of the new academic year. The government of India's Andhra Pradesh state has introduced English as a second language from Class 1 onwards for the 2011-2012 academic year. India's National Knowledge Commission has admitted that no more than one percent of country's population uses English as a second language. AFP PHOTO/Noah SEELAM (Photo credit should read )

Here Come the Young

In the coming years, the population of people under the age of 30 in some of the most fragile and unstable countries is going to skyrocket. And the world is not ready for them.

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