Russia

A 26-year-old victim of domestic violence poses for pictures in Moscow on Feb. 3, 2017. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

In Russia, Feminist Memes Buy Jail Time, but Domestic Abuse Doesn’t

A year after the country decriminalized domestic violence, women feel the consequences.

Russian President Vladimir Putin appears on a computer screen in an internet cafe in Moscow on July 6, 2006. (Denis Sinyakov/AFP/Getty Images)

Battling the Bots

Analysts are increasingly using artificial intelligence to track Russian disinformation campaigns.

A Syrian rebel fighter with the National Liberation Front watches towards the regime areas in northwestern Aleppo province on October 9, 2018. (Aaref Watad/AFP/Getty Images)

The New U.N. Envoy to Syria Should Kill the Political Process to Save It

A tougher stance from the United Nations would put pressure on Assad and Putin while improving the lives of ordinary Syrians.

A convoy of Russian troops makes its way through the mountains in the village of Dzhaba on August 9, 2008 as Georgian troops battled with Russian forces over breakaway provinces.

Ethnic Nationalism Gave Georgia Freedom. Now It Needs Civic Nationalism to Survive.

The Caucasus is a complex ethnic and religious patchwork, and only a shared identity can help Georgians push back against Putin.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a meeting in Helsinki on July 16. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s Bad for Trump Is Worse for Putin

The Kremlin can expect more sanctions and more investigations from a Democratic House.

The ship Mein Schiff 6 is built at the Meyer Turku shipyard in Turku, Finland, on Sept. 6, 2016. (Jussi Nukari/AFP/Getty Images)

There’s No Plan B for Port Security

Privatization and automation have left global shipping fatally exposed.

House Intelligence Committee member Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.)  speaks at a news conference about the Trump-Putin Helsinki summit in Washington on July 17. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

How House Democrats Will Investigate Trump’s Russia Ties

Gains in congressional midterm elections give Democrats crucial subpoena power.

A Russian policeman looks at TV screens in a shop in Moscow on Feb. 1, 2007, during the broadcasting of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s annual address to Russian and foreign media. (Denis Sinyakov/AFP/Getty)

How Do You Say ‘Fake News’ in Russian?

Russian news sites portray the U.S. presidential election as a prelude to civil war.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, center, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, right, and Vladimir Korolev, the commander in chief of the Navy, examine a globe in St. Petersburg on July 30, 2017. (Alexey Nikolsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Pushing the United States Toward Nuclear Anarchy

The White House wants to leave the INF Treaty. New START could be next. The death of these agreements would fuel a new arms race.

Deputy Chief Monitor of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine, Alexander Hug (2nd L), reacts as fellow OSCE members (R) look on during a meeting with separatists in Donetsk on July 30, 2014. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

Counting the Dead in Europe’s Forgotten War

The deputy head of the OSCE’s observer mission in Ukraine describes the challenges and frustrations of monitoring the war.

U.S. President Donald Trump answers during a joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on July 16. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Trump Is Right About the INF

To be worth keeping, a treaty that bans nuclear missiles needs to include all nuclear powers.

Donald Trump talks with journalists during a rally against the Iran nuclear deal in Washington on Sept. 9, 2015. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Trump’s Punk Rock Nuclear Policy

The only reason to pull out of the INF Treaty is to give a middle finger to the world.

John Bolton, the national security advisor to the U.S. president, gives a press conference in Moscow on Oct. 23. (Yuri Kadovnov/ AFP)

Would INF Withdrawal Recreate a Nuclear Hair-Trigger World?

Junk enough arms control treaties, and the Cold War balance of terror will reign once again—this time with China in the mix.

This aerial photo taken on Jan. 2, 2017, shows a Chinese navy formation, including the aircraft carrier Liaoning (C), during military drills in the South China Sea. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Plan to Leave a Major Arms Treaty With Russia Might Actually Be About China

Leaving the agreement clears the way for the U.S. to boost its conventional forces in the Pacific.

Supporters of opposition leader and newly elected Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan celebrate in the streets of Yerevan on May 8. (Karen Minasyan/AFP/Getty Images)

Armenia’s Post-Revolution Party Is Over

The country’s new government wants to root out corruption—but the ancien régime isn't giving up without a fight.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence addresses the Hudson Institute in Washington on the administration's policy toward China on Oct. 4. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia Is 4chan, China Is Facebook

Mike Pence’s equation of Beijing’s influence with Moscow’s hacking was misleading and dangerous

Milorad Dodik delivers a speech in the northern Bosnian town of Doboj on Oct. 7. (Elvis Barukcic AFP/Getty Images)

One of Bosnia’s New Presidents May Want to Break the Country Apart

Dodik campaigned on independence for Republika Srpska. Will Putin help him get his way?

U.S. and Polish troops in Orzysz, Poland, on April 13, 2017. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Fort Trump Is a Farce

The question of a permanent U.S. military presence in Poland is complicated. The White House shouldn’t treat it as a vanity project.

The Danske Bank building in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The Danske Bank Scandal Is the Tip of the Iceberg

Financial institutions and the governments that regulate them aren’t doing nearly enough to prevent money laundering.  

Far-right protesters in Poland hold an anti-EU banner during a demonstration in Warsaw on a Jul. 25, 2015. (Wojtek Radwanski/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s New Populism

Warsaw may be turning away from the European Union, but that doesn’t mean that it is turning toward Moscow instead.

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