Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin welcomes his Kazakh counterpart Nursultan Nazarbayev in the Kremlin in Moscow, on Dec. 19, 2012. (Maxim Shemetov/AFP/Getty Images)

Putin Wants a Kazakh Retirement

Russia and Kazakhstan have plenty in common. Why not the transition plans for their longtime presidents?

Participants at a gay pride festival in Prague celebrate on Aug. 17, 2013. (Michal Cizek/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the Czech Republic Tear Down Europe’s Rainbow Curtain?

Eastern Europe has long resisted same-sex marriage. Prague might be about to change that.

Kazakhstan’s President Nursultan Nazarbayev shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping during a signing ceremony in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on June 7, 2018. (Greg Baker-Pool/Getty Images)

Nazarbayev Is Giving Up Presidency, Not Power, in Kazakhstan

The long-time autocrat's shock resignation kicks off an opaque succession process.

Young men pay their respects to the victims of the mosque attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand on March 16. (Tessa Burrows/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, New Zealand saw its worst-ever terrorist attack, and Boeing aircraft around the world were grounded.

Eliot Higgins in December 2018. (Claudia Leisinger for Foreign Policy)

How Citizen Journalists Solved the Mystery of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17

On the podcast: The founder of the group Bellingcat on using open sources to investigate war crimes and abuses.

A Ukrainian soldier stands guard aboard the military vessel "Dondass" moored in Mariupol, the Sea of Azov port on Nov. 27, 2018, after three Ukrainian navy vessels were forcibly seized off the coast of Crimea by Russian forces.

Russia’s Next Land Grab Won’t Be in an Ex-Soviet State. It Will Be in Europe.

First he came for Georgia, then for Ukraine. Vladimir Putin’s next target is likely to be a non-NATO nation in the EU.

Russian Defense Ministry officials show off the Russia's 9M729 cruise missile at the military Patriot Park outside Moscow on Jan. 23. (Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Begins Work on New Missiles as Trump Scraps Treaty With Russia

Some worry the deployment of these weapons could spark a nonnuclear missile race.

A construction worker works on the TurkStream pipeline in the Black Sea on June 23, 2017. (TurkStream Project/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Russia’s Pipe Dreams Are Europe’s Nightmare

Putin’s plans to run the TurkStream pipeline through the Balkans won’t end well.

Pakistani army soldiers gather near a vehicle at a border terminal in Ghulam Khan, a town in North Waziristan, on the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan, on January 27, 2019.

Everyone Wants a Piece of Afghanistan

A U.S. withdrawal has opened the door to a possible political settlement, but success will depend on regional powers and the country’s neighbors.

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech under the rain during celebrations for Navy Day in Baltiysk in the Kaliningrad region on July 26, 2015.

Don’t Believe the Russian Hype

Moscow’s missile capabilities in the Baltic Sea region are not nearly as dangerous as they seem.

The first of two Terminal High Altitude Area Defense interceptors is launched during a successful intercept test in the United States on Sept. 10, 2013. (Ralph Scott/Missile Defense Agency)

Despite Trump’s Tough Talk, No Boost for Missile Defense Agency

The administration will instead increase investments in offensive missile defense capabilities, such as hypersonic technology.

Russia's MiG-31 supersonic interceptor jets carrying hypersonic Kinzhal missiles fly over Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow on May 9, 2018. (Kirill Kudryatsev/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s New Missiles Are Aimed at the U.S.

But Moscow’s hypersonic weapons may be more bark than bite.

A screen shows visitors being filmed by AI security cameras with facial recognition technology at the 14th China International Exhibition on Public Safety and Security at the China International Exhibition Center in Beijing on Oct. 24, 2018.

Whoever Predicts the Future Will Win the AI Arms Race

China, Russia, and the United States are approaching the long-term strategic potential of artificial intelligence very differently. The country that gets it right will reap huge military benefits.

Pakistani soldiers stand next to what Pakistan says is the wreckage of an Indian fighter jet shot down in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir near the Line of Control on Feb. 27. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Dogfight Loss Could Be a Win for U.S. Weapons-Makers

Boeing and Lockheed Martin are vying for India’s long-delayed fighter replacement program.

An elderly woman casts her ballot in a mobile ballot box in Bardar, Moldova on Feb. 24, 2019. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images)

People of the World, Stop Looking at Moldova!

Politicians in this corner of Eastern Europe insist their country is a stage for geopolitical rivalry between the West and Russia—the better to profit from the attention.

A protestor aims a gun at an effigy of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at a rally in Quetta, Pakistan on March 1. (Bananas Khan/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, India and Pakistan faced off in Kashmir, and Trump left Hanoi empty-handed.

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman transits the Atlantic Ocean on Dec. 12, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Scott Swofford/Released)

Nothing Projects Power Like an Aircraft Carrier. Does the Pentagon Think Otherwise?

New details emerge of how former U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis fought against the Navy’s plan to buy more carriers.

China’s President Xi Jinping is welcomed by his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, in Moscow on March 22, 2013. (Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images)

The New Cold War’s Warm Friends

Why Chinese and Russian detente may be here to stay.

Michael Cohen, a former attorney and fixer for U.S. President Donald Trump, prepares to testify before the House Oversight Committee in Washington on Feb. 27. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Cohen: Trump Had Advance Notice on WikiLeaks Email Release

Blasted by House Republicans as a liar, Trump’s longtime fixer suspects but cannot prove collusion with Russia.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman laughs with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires on Nov. 30, 2018. (Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

Who’s Afraid of Saudi Nukes?

Riyadh’s reckless behavior foments widespread mistrust of its plans to buy nuclear reactors.

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