Saudi Arabia

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with the Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, in the Oval Office at the White House on April 10.

Trump Will Regret Changing His Mind About Qatar

The United States has the leverage needed to prevent Qatar from cozying up to Iran and the Muslim Brotherhood—if it’s willing to use it.

Crown Prince Of Saudi Arabia Mohammad Bin Salman speaks during a bilateral meeting with U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis March 22, 2018 at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Is Weak, Weak, Weak

Saudi Arabia has started a crisis with Canada because it doesn't want to admit its own failings.

A satellite view of the Bab el-Mandeb Strait near Yemen on March 28, 2015. (USGS/NASA Landsat/Orbital Horizon/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Iran’s Yemeni Proxies Put Oil Shipments in Crosshairs

A Houthi attack on two Saudi oil tankers near Yemen could be an Iranian bid to hammer a key energy choke point.

Iranian protesters hold a portrait of the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard's Quds Force, Gen. Qassem Suleimani, during a demonstration in the capital Tehran on December 11, 2017.

Iran Hawks Should Be Careful What They Wish For

Pushing for regime change in Tehran could put Qassem Suleimani in power.

An oil tanker prepares to dock at Khark Island in the Persian Gulf on March 12, 2017. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Push to Ban Iranian Oil Could Mean Pain at the Pump

Big buyers of Iranian oil such as China are seen as unlikely to cut purchases to zero, but sanctions will still send crude prices higher.

OPEC Conference President Saudi Arabia's Energy Minister Khaled al-Falih (2ndR), OPEC  Secretary General Mohammed Barkindo (R) and Angola's Governor for OPEC and Chairman of the Board of Governors Estevao Pedro (2nd L) the 173rd OPEC Conference of Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in Vienna, on November 30, 2017. (Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images)

This Isn’t Your Father’s OPEC Anymore

Global oil markets are controlled by Russia and Saudi Arabia — despite America’s shale boom.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Jared Kushner meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem, Israel, on May 22, 2017. (Kobi Gideon/GPO via Getty Images)

Kushner’s Peace Plan Is a Disaster Waiting to Happen

The last thing Israelis and Palestinians need now is another failed blueprint. Stabilizing Gaza is more important.

Mahmoud Abbas waits to address the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters, September 20, 2017 in New York City.

Mohammed bin Salman Has Thrown the Palestinians Under the Bus

The United States and Arab governments have abandoned the Palestinian cause and believe they can browbeat Mahmoud Abbas into submission.

An Iraqi worker at an oil refinery in Nasiriyah, Oct. 30, 2015. (Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Agrees to Boost Oil Output

The oil cartel vowed to add 1 million barrels a day to markets. It won’t add quite that much.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak at an OPEC meeting in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Close to Agreement to Open the Oil Taps

With or without Iranian cooperation, extra barrels of crude could help meet rising demand. But there’s still reason to fear a price spike later this year.

Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz (C), Bahrain's King Hamad bin Issa al-Khalifa (R) and Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah attend a Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) informal summit in the Saudi Red Sea city of Jeddah on May 31, 2016.(STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)

Kuwait and Oman Are Stuck in Arab No Man’s Land

The showdown with Qatar is forcing all Middle Eastern countries to pick sides — and leaving two of them in the lurch.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (R) shakes hands with Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (L) at the Great Hall of the People on March 17, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Lintao Zhang - Pool/Getty Images)

China Smells Opportunity in the Middle East’s Crisis

Beijing is using the region's ongoing woes to solidify its own geopolitical agenda.

Demonstrators protest near the prime minister's office in Amman, Jordan, on June 6. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

Jordan’s Protests Are a Ritual, Not a Revolution

By trading geopolitical importance for aid and showing restraint when unrest erupts, the kingdom has managed to remain stable for decades.

H.H. Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar, on February 24, 2018 in Doha, Qatar. (Neville Hopwood/Getty Images)

Qatar Won the Saudi Blockade

A Saudi-led coalition wanted to permanently ostracize its rival. One year later, Qatar has more influence in the West than ever.

Ivanka Trump andJared Kushner at the presentation of the Order of Abdulaziz al-Saud medal at the Saudi Royal Court in Riyadh on May 20, 2017.(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Riyalpolitik and the Art of Influence in Trump’s Washington

America's Arab allies have always wanted to buy direct access to U.S. foreign policy, and they finally found a seller.

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant on Aug. 21, 2010. (IIPA via Getty Images)

In the Middle East, Soon Everyone Will Want the Bomb

The region is at risk of a nuclear arms race. Washington needs to stop proliferation before it starts.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

South Korean President Moon Jae-In and U.S. President Donald Trump    at the presidential Blue House on November 7, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea.

Trump Is Following, Not Leading

The United States has outsourced its foreign policy to regional allies. In South Korea, it might lead to peace — in Israel, it’s more likely leading to war.

Donald Trump at a rally May 5, 2016 in Charleston, West Virginia. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Iran Policy Is Blowing Up His Energy Agenda

The U.S. president wanted to be energy independent, but he’s forcing his country to get more deeply involved in the global oil market.

An Iranian woman walks past a mural on the wall of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran on May 8. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Fresh U.S. Sanctions Not Likely to Strangle Iran’s Oil Market

Trump walks away from the nuclear deal, but big Asian buyers are likely to keep snapping up Iranian crude.

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