Saudi Arabia

U.S. President Donald Trump shows off posters as he talks with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman during a meeting at the White House on March 20.(Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Trump’s Blank Check Diplomacy is Remaking the U.S.-Saudi Relationship

The U.S. president is keen to sweep any discussion of the kingdom's involvement in Jamal Khashoggi’s killing under the rug, raising big questions about his foreign policy.

A protester dressed as Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman and another dressed as U.S. President Donald Trump stand outside the White House in the wake of the disappearance of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi on Oct. 19. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

How to Get Away With Murder (Saudi Edition)

A primer on Riyadh’s denials, excuses, rationalizations, spin, and other acts of sophistry about the death of Jamal Khashoggi.

Then-Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the G-20 opening ceremony at the Hangzhou International Expo Center in Hangzhou, China, on Sept. 4, 2016. (Nicolas Asfouri/Getty Images)

The Saudis Are Killing America’s Middle East Policy

Mohammad bin Salman isn’t just ruining his own reputation—he’s spoiling Washington’s policies across the region.

Iran is trying to maintain oil exports in the face of U.S. sanctions. An oil tanker off the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas on July 2, 2012. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the U.S. Make Oil Sanctions on Iran Work?

Given pushback from friends and foes, Trump’s goal of zero Iranian exports is still far off.

Portraits of Saudi King Salman bin Abdulazziz and his son Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are seen on October 18, 2018 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Jamal Khashoggi Had Skin in the Game. The Crown Prince’s Cheerleaders Didn’t.

Too often, Westerners treat courageous local experts like pawns in a political game. The journalist’s murder should serve as a reminder that, for some, writing an op-ed is a deadly risk.

A security official waits in front of the door of the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 17. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kingdom’s Hackers and Bots

Saudi Arabia is using cutting-edge technology to track dissidents and stifle dissent.

Manal al-Sharif reads from her book, Daring to Drive: A Saudi Woman's Awakening, in Munich on Oct. 8, 2017. (Andreas Gebert/picture alliance via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

‘They Took Them Quietly. All of Them Are in Jail Today.’

On the podcast: A woman who challenged the Saudi regime by getting behind the wheel of a car speaks out.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Saudi King Salman during the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Summit at the Istanbul Congress Center on April 14, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Khashoggi’s Death Is Highlighting the Ottoman-Saudi Islamic Rift

The journalist’s suspected murder, and its aftermath, was the latest battle of a 300-year war over Sunni Islam.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman participates in a meeting between members of the British government and Saudi ministers and delegates in London on March 7. (Dan Kitwood/WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Will the Saudis’ Khashoggi Confession Get Them Off the Hook?

By claiming they were only trying to abduct the journalist, they’re hoping to draw a moral equivalence with U.S. renditions.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House on March 20. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is America’s Middle East Strategy on Steroids

Donald Trump isn’t just maintaining an alliance with Saudi Arabia—he’s choosing it over the rest of the world.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press briefing at the State Department in Washington on Oct. 3 (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Washington Blame Game Ensues as Ambassador Posts Sit Empty

The disappearance of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi spotlights a staffing problem.

Security personnel at the front door of Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 11. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

The Investigators Trump Says Are in Turkey Don’t Seem to Be There

Under pressure to act, the president appears to get out ahead of his team on the Khashoggi probe.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Saudi Arabia-United States Partnership Meeting in Washington on March 23. (Bandar Algaloud/Saudi Kingdom Council/Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

The U.S.-Saudi Relationship: Too Faustian to Fail?

Trump’s in too deep with Mohammed bin Salman to make a stink about Jamal Khashoggi.

Families wait for care at a health center in Yemen in September. (Courtesy International Rescue Committee)

Starvation and Child Soldiers: On the Ground in Yemen

International Rescue Committee chief sees the devastation firsthand and calls on the United States to end support for the Saudi-led coalition.

A police officer enters the Consulate General of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul, Turkey, as the search continues for Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who has been missing since he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. (Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is Even Stranger Than It Seems

The Saudi journalist is presumed dead, but we may never know what happened to him.

A woman holds a portrait of missing journalist and Riyadh critic Jamal Khashoggi reading "Jamal Khashoggi is missing since October 2" during a demonstration in front of the Saudi Arabian consulate on Oct. 9, 2018 in Istanbul. (OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

Mohammad bin Salman Is Scared of Saudi Expats

The crown prince will stop at nothing to silence his growing number of critics, regardless of where they live.

Posters advocating for Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi hang on a police barricade in front of  Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 8. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is a Slap in the Face to the United States

Washington should explore retaliatory measures that impose real costs on Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Britain's Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, gestures to the crowd not to cheer him before he speaks during a rally in central London on May 12, 2018.

Jeremy Corbyn Has a Soft Spot for Extremists

The British Labour leader misses no opportunity to condemn the West, but he’s full of praise for violent revolutionaries.

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