Saudi Arabia

Yemeni supporters of the Houthi movement rally in Sanaa.

How to End the War in Yemen

Since the September attack on Saudi oil facilities, Riyadh and the Houthis have taken a step back from all-out war. All parties, including the United States, should seize this rare opportunity to resolve the conflict.

U.S. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper

Pentagon Chief: ‘We Are Not Abandoning the Kurds’

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper defended the decision to withdraw troops from the Turkey-Syria border even while sending additional forces to Saudi Arabia.

Participants including Saudi women attend a hackathon prior to the start of the annual hajj pilgrimage in Jeddah on Aug. 1, 2018.

China Could Be the Big Winner of Saudi Arabia’s Race to Become a Tech Hub

Beijing is a natural partner to fast and cheap development, but Riyadh should be wary of alienating its allies.

Newly recruited Houthi fighters chant slogans as they ride a military vehicle during a gathering in the capital Sanaa to mobilize more fighters to battlefronts to fight pro-government forces in several Yemeni cities, on Jan. 3, 2017.

Saudi Arabia’s Self-Fulfilling Houthi Prophecy

The Yemeni minority group hardly had anything to do with Iran—until the Saudis got involved.

U.S. President Donald Trump exits after speaking at the U.N. General Assembly in New York City on Sept. 24.

Trump’s Iran Policy Is a Failure

Blame U.S. blunders for the worsening crisis in the region.

The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ commander, Maj. Gen. Hossein Salami, speaks during the unveiling of an exhibition of what Iran says are U.S. and other drones captured in its territory at the Islamic Revolution and Holy Defense Museum in Tehran on Sept. 21.

Iran Is Already Losing

Washington shouldn’t fall for Tehran’s trap and get involved in a conflict in the Gulf. Instead, it should stick to its current war of attrition.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference at the Canadian Consulate General in New York City on May 17, 2018.

Our Top Weekend Reads

India-Pakistan tensions escalate, the United States accuses Iran of being behind attacks on Saudi Arabia, and the results of Israel’s election remain uncertain.

Saudi defense ministry spokesman Col. Turki bin Saleh al-Malki speaks during a press conference on Sept. 18 in Riyadh about the recent attacks on Saudi Aramco’s facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais.

Arms Sales Can’t Replace U.S. Engagement in the Gulf

Without better infrastructure for using U.S.-made weapons systems, the Arab countries will keep coming up short.

Sailors watch the sunset atop an F/A-18E Super Hornet on the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt in the 5th Fleet area of operations on March 23, 2018.

Iran-Saudi Crisis Resurrects an Old Question: Does the U.S. Need to Be There at All?

Trump’s reluctance to retaliate against Iran may reflect his belief that an “energy independent” United States no longer needs to protect the region.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani attend a news conference in Sochi, Russia, on Feb. 14.

Putin Is Trolling the United States in the Persian Gulf

In the wake of the drone attacks on Saudi Arabia, the Russian president has positioned himself as a peacemaker. But continued conflict is his friend.

Iranian women walk in the capital, Tehran, on Aug. 27. Iran’s economy has struggled with U.S. sanctions and could face even more after last weekend’s attack on Saudi oil facilities.

Trump Sanctions Iran Again, Inching Toward Economic Blockade

But some experts say the move is a weak response to alleged Iranian attacks on Saudi oil.

Iranians burn an image of U.S. President Donald Trump during a demonstration outside the former U.S. embassy headquarters in Tehran on May 9, 2018.

The Real Reason Trump Won’t Attack Iran

Starting a war to protect oil markets will only backfire.

Gasoline prices are displayed on a sign at a Shell gas station as an image of Donald Trump appears on a billboard nearby April 24, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

The Myth of U.S. Energy Independence Has Gone Up in Smoke

Attacks on Saudi Arabia prove that, when it comes to oil, Washington still isn’t close to being master of its own fate.

and now the hard part podcast artwork

Coming Sept. 23: And Now the Hard Part

Foreign Policy and the Brookings Institution are teaming up for a new podcast focused on practical solutions to the biggest challenges facing the world today.

President Donald Trump joins dancers with swords at a welcome ceremony ahead of a banquet at the Murabba Palace in Riyadh on May 20, 2017. /

This Is the Moment That Decides the Future of the Middle East

If the United States is done fighting for Saudi Arabia’s oil, it's done fighting for the entire region.

A picture taken on Sept. 15 shows an Aramco oil facility at the edge of the Saudi capital, Riyadh.

What You Need to Know About the Attacks on Saudi Oil Facilities

So far, attacks attributed to Iran haven’t resulted in a military confrontation with the United States.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan of Abu Dhabi in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, May 15, 2017.

The Emiratis Bit Off More Than They Could Chew

The UAE decided it would be a leader in shaping the Middle East. Now it’s made a dramatic U-turn.

A soldier inspects debris at the site of a car bomb attack that took place at police station in Aden, Yemen, on Aug. 1.

Mohammed bin Salman’s Collapsing Coalition in Yemen Means Trouble for Trump

Growing tensions between long-standing allies Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates could lead to southern secession in Yemen and harm the White House’s pressure campaign on Iran.

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