Saudi Arabia

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant on Aug. 21, 2010. (IIPA via Getty Images)

In the Middle East, Soon Everyone Will Want the Bomb

The region is at risk of a nuclear arms race. Washington needs to stop proliferation before it starts.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

South Korean President Moon Jae-In and U.S. President Donald Trump    at the presidential Blue House on November 7, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea.

Trump Is Following, Not Leading

The United States has outsourced its foreign policy to regional allies. In South Korea, it might lead to peace — in Israel, it’s more likely leading to war.

Donald Trump at a rally May 5, 2016 in Charleston, West Virginia. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Iran Policy Is Blowing Up His Energy Agenda

The U.S. president wanted to be energy independent, but he’s forcing his country to get more deeply involved in the global oil market.

An Iranian woman walks past a mural on the wall of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran on May 8. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Fresh U.S. Sanctions Not Likely to Strangle Iran’s Oil Market

Trump walks away from the nuclear deal, but big Asian buyers are likely to keep snapping up Iranian crude.

Iranian soldiers march during a parade marking the country's Army Day, on April 18, 2017, in Tehran. (ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

The First Saudi-Iranian War Will Be an Even Fight

What happens when the Saudi military's massive budget meets Iran's mastery of asymmetric warfare? Here's a preview.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih, left, and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak attend a meeting between OPEC and non-OPEC members in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Right to Target Saudi-Russian Collusion

Moscow and Riyadh are conspiring to rig global oil markets against the United States.

Chris Gash illustration for Foreign Policy

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.

President Donald Trump presents a defense sales chart with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the White House on March 20. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Congress Sours on Saudi Arabia Over Yemen

While the White House fetes the kingdom’s crown prince, lawmakers are running out of patience with Riyadh’s catastrophic war in Yemen.

President Donald Trump meets with Mohammed bin Salman, then deputy crown prince, in the Oval Office on March 14, 2017.

Crown Prince of Disorder

Mohammed bin Salman's consolidation of power is making Saudi Arabia a more unpredictable U.S. ally than ever before.

Donald Trump meets with Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia, in the Oval Office at the White House, March 14, 2017. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Saudi Arabia Can Win Islam’s War of Ideas

Mohammed bin Salman’s embrace of “moderate Islam” deserves the Trump administration’s support.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on March 7, 2018 in London, England. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Isn’t Wonky Enough

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince knows his country needs an economic overhaul, but his plans don’t add up.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends a meeting on November 14, 2017, in Riyadh. (FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Strongmen Are Weaker Than They Look

Authoritarians are on the rise around the world, but history shows they’re mostly helpless.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry (left) and Saudi Energy Minister Khaled al-Falih (right) shake hands after a signing ceremony of a memorandum understanding on carbon management between Saudi Arabia and the U.S., on Dec. 4, 2017 in Riyadh. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

Don’t Give Saudi Arabia An Easy Path to Nukes

To prevent proliferation, any U.S.-Saudi nuclear deal needs to be tough.

U.S. President Donald Trump brandishes a sword during a welcome ceremony in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on May 20, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Middle East Strategy Is Totally Boring

There’s a very familiar method to the administration’s apparent regional madness.

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