science

Laboratory technicians handle capped vials as part of filling and packaging tests for the large-scale production and supply of the University of Oxford’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate, AZD1222, in Anagni, Italy, on Sept. 11.

Joining COVAX Could Save American Lives

The vaccine partnership would help ensure equitable access to a COVID-19 vaccine—including in the United States—but Trump won’t participate.

Finnish President Sauli Niinisto welcomes Russian President Vladimir Putin

Our Top Weekend Reads

Finland’s president carves a diplomatic niche, the coronavirus pandemic sounds alarm bells about genetic engineering, and Donald Trump seeks to actualize his dictatorial dreams.

An infrared microscope image shows mosquito larvae with red-glowing eyes, part of an experiment using CRISPR gene-editing technology.

The Genetic Engineering Genie Is Out of the Bottle

The next pandemic could be bioengineered in someone’s garage using cheap and widely available technology.

A fisherman floats on the Mekong River in Thailand

Science Shows Chinese Dams Are Devastating the Mekong

New data demonstrates a devastating effect on downstream water supplies that feed millions of people.

Signs opposing fracking

Why Scientists Should Shape Environmental Policy

The case of fracking in Pennsylvania shows that if experts and fossil fuel industry leaders can cooperate, innovation is possible.

A medical staff member takes the temperature of a man at the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in China on Jan. 25.

How China’s Coronavirus Is Spreading—and How to Stop It

Studies are building toward a tentative clinical profile of the outbreak.

Team Tartan Rescue's CHIMP (CMU Highly Intelligent Mobile Platform) robot uses a hand-held power tool during the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robotics Challenge in California on June 6, 2015.

The United States Needs a Strategy for Artificial Intelligence

Without one, it risks missing out on all the technology’s benefits—and falling behind rivals such as China.

Five cloned macaques at a Chinese research institution

China’s Biotech Boom Could Transform Lives—or Destroy Them

Washington and Beijing have a shared interest in making sure new technology stays within limits.

Participants including Saudi women attend a hackathon prior to the start of the annual hajj pilgrimage in Jeddah on Aug. 1, 2018.

China Could Be the Big Winner of Saudi Arabia’s Race to Become a Tech Hub

Beijing is a natural partner to fast and cheap development, but Riyadh should be wary of alienating its allies.

A strong wind blows embers around a resident hosing his burning property during the Creek Fire in Sunland, California, on Dec. 5, 2017.

Trump’s Shadow War on Climate Science

The resignation of a State Department official is the latest instance of a systematic suppression of evidence, former officials and whistleblowers say.

A scene from season 1 of HBO’s 'Chernobyl.'

‘Chernobyl’ Shows How the Soviets Squashed Scientists

The brutal legacy of industrialization left the “scientific-technical intelligentsia” in the cold.

Hsue-Shen Tsien, left, confers with his lawyer, Grant B. Cooper, during his deportation hearing on Nov. 16, 1950. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

The Man Who Took China to Space

Hsue-Shen Tsien was driven out of the United States by political paranoia. Will the same happen to a new generation of Chinese talent?

A nurse takes care of a terminally ill patient at an HIV/AIDS clinic in Kiev, Ukraine, on July 6, 2010. (SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the Next Deadly AIDS Pandemic

The world thought it had fought the HIV virus to a stalemate—but its strategy was flawed in ways that are only now becoming clear.

Dr. John Fildes walks with President Donald Trump at University Medical Center, October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Trump’s Battle Against Breastfeeding Is a Small Part of a Wider War

With escalating drug prices and growing vaccine paranoia, American populism is taking down the edifice of global public health.

The Red Dress illustration for Foreign Policy

Facing the Future of Work

FP’s editor in chief introduces our July issue on how to adapt to robots, AI, trade wars, and an aging world.

A researcher disinfects a one-day-old panda cub in an incubator at the China Wolong Giant Panda Protection and Research Centre on August 8, 2006  (China Photos/Getty Images)

Don’t Close the Door on Chinese Scientists Like Me

New visa limitations for Chinese students only aid Beijing’s technocratic ambitions.

A voter casts her ballot in the referendum to end the guerrilla war between the FARC and the Colombian government in Bogotá on Oct. 2, 2016. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Here’s How the United States Can Help Colombia Thrive

As an era of peace approaches, both countries should take practical steps to strengthen the relationship.

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit Broward Health North hospital in Pompano Beach, Florida, on Feb. 16. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet Trump’s New, Homophobic Public Health Quack

The Centers for Disease Control will soon be run by a military doctor with a long history of pushing discriminatory AIDS policies.

The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft is launched from the B-52B launch aircraft. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Pentagon Official Says U.S. Hypersonic Weapons Research Underfunded

Amid reports of a new Russian missile, DARPA's chief says the United States lacks infrastructure.

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