Somalia

Refugees walk with their goats in floodwaters at the Dadaab refugee complex, in the northeast of Kenya, on April 17, 2018.

The West’s Obsession With ‘Good Refugees’ Is Bad Policy

Wealthy countries love to celebrate immigrant success stories, but they are letting many potentially productive citizens fall through the cracks.

Somali President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed, also known as Farmajo, delivers a speech in Nairobi on Nov. 26, 2018.

Will Somalia’s Missed Election Lead to Chaos?

The vote scheduled for early February was canceled, leading to uncertainty and a power vacuum in Mogadishu.

People attend the funeral ceremony of Mogadishu Mayor Abdirahman Omar Osman, who died a week after being seriously wounded in an al-Shabab suicide attack at his office, in Mogadishu on Aug. 4, 2019.

Trump’s Withdrawal From Somalia Is a Security Threat. Biden Should Reverse It.

U.S. troops are scheduled to leave the country on Jan. 15, opening the door for al-Shabab terrorists to step up their attacks. The new administration should recommit to protecting the country.

Wind turbines tower over a building on a farm in Colorado City, Texas, on Jan. 21, 2016.

The Best Deep Dives of 2020

Essential reads from a Chinese wind farm in Del Rio, Texas, to U.N. headquarters.

Members of the Somali military watch as firefighters work to extinguish a blaze after a car bomb exploded in Mogadishu on Jan. 29, 2019.

10 Conflicts to Watch in 2021

The world in 2021 will be haunted by the legacies of 2020: an ongoing pandemic, an economic crisis, Donald Trump’s divisive presidency—and new threats emanating from wars and climate change.

A Somali police officer patrols as bystanders gather at the site of a suicide car bomb explosion in Mogadishu on Sept. 30, 2019.

Trump’s Plan to Withdraw From Somalia Couldn’t Come at a Worse Time

Whether political theater or not, calls to leave could exacerbate violence and increase the influence of Russia and China.

Hodan Osman on Harvard University’s campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on May 16, 2018.

Can One Woman Fix a Failed State?

Hodan Osman couldn’t stamp out Somalia’s endemic corruption. But she made sure the country’s soldiers got paid.

A Somali American protester kneels during a call for justice for George Floyd, a Black man who was killed by police, in Minneapolis on June 1.

‘This Is Personal’: Minnesota’s Somali Americans Fear Reckoning in Second Trump Term

A solid blue state is closer to being in play this year—galvanizing Somali Americans in an election they call “do or die.”

Somali children in a camp for displaced people after hundreds fled U.S. airstrikes against al-Shabab in Baidoa, autonomous South West State of Somalia, on Dec. 18, 2018.

Some Germans Will Be Happy to See U.S. Troops Leave

Left-wing groups say the troop presence has made Germany complicit in U.S. drone wars.

A livestock market in Hargeisa, Somaliland, on Aug. 18, 2018.

Why a Quiet Hajj Is Hurting Somalia

Somalia usually sells millions of animals to Saudi Arabia to feed pilgrims. This year, it has nowhere to send its goats.

Al-Qaeda linked al-Shabab recruits walk down a street on March 5, 2012 in the Deniile district of Somalian capital, Mogadishu, following their graduation.

In Somalia, Iran Is Replicating Russia’s Afghan Strategy

Iranian forces are supporting al-Shabab and allegedly offering bounties. The U.S. government must stop Tehran before it further destabilizes the Horn of Africa.

A MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft is parked in an aircraft shelter at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nevada, on Nov. 17, 2015.

Trump Inherited the Drone War but Ditched Accountability

Only a single formal check remains on U.S. killings worldwide.

Students walk in a Mogadishu neighborhood wearing face masks as a protective measure against the coronavirus in Somalia on March 19.

‘We Are Used to a Virus Called Bombs’

The coronavirus will ravage a resilient Somalia—with ripples far beyond its borders.

All shops are closed at a clothes market in Djibouti during the coronavirus pandemic.

U.S. Military’s Hub in Africa Fights to Keep the Coronavirus Out

Contractors who work at the only permanent U.S. base in Africa have tested positive for the coronavirus as officials and experts fear the pandemic’s spread could allow terrorist groups to wrest away more territory.

Locusts take flight from ground vegetation as young girls run toward their cattle at Larisoro village near Archers Post, Kenya, on Jan. 21.

Top U.S. Aid Chief Warns of Locust Devastation in East Africa

“You really have to go back to decades ago in the U.S., to Dust Bowl days, to understand just how devastating this can be.”

Somalis wait at a food distribution center outside Mogadishu.

U.S. Bureaucratic Blunder Could Cost Somalia Desperately Needed Debt Relief

U.S. ambassador considers resigning over the issue, which could harm U.S. anti-terrorism mission and aid programs there, officials say.

Load 10 More Articles