South Africa

Soldiers from the Mozambican army patrol Mocimboa da Praia, Mozambique, on March 7, 2018, following October’s two-day attack by suspected Islamists.

Mozambique’s Insurgency Is a Regional Problem

Rising extremist violence in the country’s oil-rich north threatens stability in southern Africa—and requires a coordinated response.

A Nigerian police officer

As the World Marches for American Victims, Police Brutality in Africa Goes Unnoticed

A spate of killings in Nigeria under lockdown has produced little but hashtag activism.

City of Tshwane health officials are seen during a testing drive for COVID-19 at the Bloed Street Mall in Pretoria Central Business District on June 11.

In South Africa, Racial Tensions Simmer Amid a Pandemic

A swift government response has kept the coronavirus at bay, for now, but stark inequalities, heavy-handed security forces, and racist rhetoric are threatening the country’s hard-won unity.

Youths kneel in front of police with their hands in the air during protests in Soweto, South Africa, on June 16, 1976.

Is America’s Future South Africa’s Past?

There are uncomfortable parallels between the United States in 2020 and South Africa in the dying days of white rule.

Kenya Face Shields

If African Governments Won’t Act, the People Will

With frustration rising over haphazard responses to the coronavirus, community networks are filling the void across the continent.

Cheerleaders perform at the opening game of the Korea Baseball Organization League at a crowdless ballpark in Incheon, South Korea, on May 5.

Tales From the Lockdown: How COVID-19 Has Changed Lives Around the World

In South Africa, people are brewing beer at home. Muslims in India are celebrating Ramadan alone. And city streets everywhere are vacant.

Commuters stand in a line to curb the spread of the coronavirus as they proceed to board a ferry at the Likoni ferry terminal in Mombasa, Kenya, on March 27.

Africa Meets Pandemic With Violence, Confusion

The coronavirus arrived late to the continent, but the early responses could backfire.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi are greeted by South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa

Coronavirus Has Started a Censorship Pandemic

Governments around the world are banning fake news about the crisis—and cracking down on their critics while they’re at it.

An Israeli settler walks past a Palestinian house with verandas covered in meshing along the Israeli-controlled Shuhada street in the West Bank city of Hebron on Jan. 28.

Trump’s Plan for Palestine Looks a Lot Like Apartheid

Israel has long resisted the South Africa analogy, but the U.S. government’s support for annexation is making it a reality.

The U.S. State Department

State Stonewalls Congress on Embassy Oversight

Allegations of mismanagement at the U.S. Embassy in South Africa go unaddressed.

Foreign Policy illustration/Getty Images

At Embassies Abroad, Trump Envoys Are Quietly Pushing Out Career Diplomats

“There’s zero support or pushback from the department for the career people,” said one former U.S. official.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson hosts African leaders and senior government representatives during the UK-Africa Investment Summit in London on Jan.20.

Boris Johnson’s New Scramble for Africa

The prime minister’s vision of a “Global Britain” after Brexit will only succeed if he abandons imperial nostalgia in favor of practical investment in the continent’s fast-growing economies.

Flood gates on the Kariba Dam wall between Zimbabwe and Zambia open on Feb. 20, 2015 after the two neighbors signed $294 million in deals with international investors. The overhaul project of the world's largest man-made dam will fix deformities and cracks in walls that were discovered in a series of assessments.

Power Cuts Are Plaguing Southern Africa. The Region Needs Renewable Energy.

Zimbabwe and its richer neighbor South Africa are in the throes of an electricity crisis. Alternative sources of energy are the solution.

Mmusi Maimane (R), then the leader of the Democratic Alliance (DA) party, and the party's former leader, Helen Zille (L) give a press conference on June 13, 2017 in Johannesburg.

The Democratic Alliance’s Demise Puts South Africa’s Multiparty Democracy at Risk

The implosion of the country’s leading opposition party is bad news for competitive politics and democratic institutions—and its impact will be felt across Africa.

vela-incident-nuclear-test-1979-illustration

Blast From the Past

Forty years ago, a U.S. satellite detected the telltale signs of a nuclear explosion. An analysis of the evidence today points to a clandestine nuclear test, a Carter administration cover-up, and only one country that was willing and able to carry it out: Israel.

A Zimbabwean man stands by one of his two cars that was set on fire after he survived a petrol bomb attack at his home near Durban, South Africa on April 19, 2015.

South Africans Are Used to Being the Targets of Racist Hatred. Now They’ve Become the Haters.

The ANC government must acknowledge that xenophobic violence is a hate crime and a betrayal of the African allies that aided it during the darkest days of apartheid.

President of Cameroon Paul Biya (L) walks with Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari (R) following his arrival at the airport in Yaoundé, Cameroon, on July 29, 2015.

No Continent for Old Men

Africa has the world’s youngest population and its oldest leaders. If the next generation wants change, young Africans must abandon dreams of private-sector success and enter the political arena.

A customer pays for a copy of the Africa edition of China Daily at a newsstand in Nairobi on Dec. 14, 2012.

In Africa, China Is the News

Beijing’s infrastructure projects may grab headlines, but its efforts to shape the media are more dangerous.

Load 10 More Articles