South America

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez addresses supporters during a campaign rally on August 3, 2012. (JUAN BARRETO/AFP/GettyImages)

Chávez’s Real Legacy Is Disaster

It's easy to blame Maduro, but the seeds of calamity were sown by his predecessor.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro walks with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 7, 2015. (Andy Wong/Getty Images)

How to Respond to Chinese Investment in Latin America

The United States can compete without making things worse.

Water is released from the floodgates of the Xiaolangdi dam on the Yellow River near Luoyang, China on June 29, 2016. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

The Beautiful Rivers—And the Dammed

Advances in solar and wind power mean that hydropower is no longer the only renewable game in town—and that’s good news for the world’s rivers.

A man reads newspaper headlines announcing Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in the Brazil’s presidential election in São Paulo on Oct. 29. (Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Military Is Not the Problem

Democracy will depend on whether civilians can exploit rifts between Bolsonaro and his base while regaining voter trust.

A single tree stands in a deforested area of Pará on Oct. 14. (Raphael Alves/AFP/Getty Images)

To Gut the Amazon, Bolsonaro Needs Local Help

The Brazilian president-elect can’t pursue his environmental policies on his own. After this weekend’s state elections, he’ll have the backing he needs.

Jair Bolsonaro waves to the crowd during a military event in São Paulo on May 3. (Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

The Military Is Back in Brazil

From security to economic policy, under Jair Bolsonaro, the armed forces will be a major player in politics.

Brazilian Workers’ Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad campaigns on Oct. 27 in São Paulo. (Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)

‘Brazil Needs Peace and Not Hate’

Ahead of a runoff presidential election, Workers’ Party candidate Fernando Haddad spoke with Foreign Policy about Brazil’s future.

Street protests have erupted in Brazil in opposition to far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, right, who is leading in polls over his opponent, Fernando Haddad, left. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images/Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images/Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images/Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

FP’s Guide to the Brazilian Election

Ten things to read or listen to before the vote.

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Flirting With Fascism

On the podcast: How Brazilians grew tired of democracy and rallied around a strongman.

A photo of Vanessa García when she was 16 with her 27-year-old boyfriend, who used the alias Darío Lulo, during their time with the FARC. Vanessa became pregnant and says she was forced to abort his child. (Erika Piñeros for Foreign Policy)

The Women Abandoned by Peace

Victims of sexual violence and forced abortion during Colombia’s long years of conflict have yet to see justice.

Venezuelan migrants living in Medellin, Colombia, sleep as they wait to attend the second Job Fair for Venezuelans in Colombia on Sept. 27. (Joaquin Sarmiento/AFP/Getty Images)

Venezuela’s Collapse Threatens Colombia’s Hard-Won Stability

Washington must help Bogotá shoulder the burden of refugees.

A child at the U.S.-Mexico fence in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on April 4. (Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Playing Chicken With Children’s Lives

The U.S. child welfare system is strained to its limits. Family separation could push it over the edge.

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro at a press conference in Bogotá on June 14. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Hugo Chávez Is Haunting Colombia’s Election

Some Colombians fear that their country could go the way of Venezuela.

Hezbollah supporters in Beirut, Lebanon, on Aug. 14, 2007. (Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Protecting Hezbollah’s Cocaine Trade in Latin America

The country's institutions are not a counterweight to Hezbollah, but its enablers.

Members of the Venezuelan National Guard take part in a ceremony on May 15, ahead of the May 20 presidential election, in Caracas. (Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time for a Coup in Venezuela

Only nationalists in the military can restore a legitimate constitutional democracy.

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