South America

A member of the Bolivarian National Police Special Forces Group holds his gun during an operation against criminal groups in the Petare neighborhood of Caracas on Jan. 25.

Venezuela Is Armed to the Hilt

The country has assembled one of the largest stockpiles of weapons in the Western Hemisphere. Here’s how to prevent it from falling into the wrong hands.

Forces loyal to President Nicolás Maduro confront supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó in Caracas on April 30.

Guaidó’s Make or Break Moment

Calling for the final phase of the revolution was the Venezuelan opposition leader’s boldest move yet, and the outcome will show whether his protest still has legs.

Juan Guaidó talks to media outside La Carlota Air Base in Caracas on April 30.

Juan Guaidó Calls Venezuelans to the Streets

A transcript of the opposition leader’s remarks from La Carlota Air Base.

A protester sits on a window of the Venezuelan Embassy in Washington on April 25.

Like Venezuela’s Presidency, D.C. Embassy Is in Limbo

Left-wing protesters occupy the Venezuelan Embassy in Washington while the Secret Service looks on.

Members of Brazil’s armed forces patrol the favelas of Chapéu Mangueira and Babilônia in Rio de Janeiro on June 21, 2018.

Brazil’s Murder Rate Finally Fell—and by a Lot

Bolsonaro will claim credit for the good news, but his policies may erase the country’s hard-won gains.

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó gather in Caracas Feb. 12. (Edilzon Gamez/Getty Images)

There Is Still a Way Out of Venezuela’s Stalemate

Both sides should heed the lessons of negotiated transitions in Chile and South Africa to forge a peaceful path to democracy.

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó gather at a rally in Caracas on Feb. 16. (Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s How Trump Can Hasten Maduro’s Exit

Thoughtful U.S. policies could help restore Venezuela’s democracy.

Police seize a hoard of cash in Salto del Guairá, Paraguay on Feb. 14, 2017. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

Paraguay Is a Fiscal Paradise for Terrorists

The South American country needs to do a better job patrolling its financial system—or face the consequences.

A poster shows Hezbollah secretary general Hassan Nasrallah, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, and Arab leader Jamal Abdel Nasser on Dec. 7, 2006 in Beirut. (Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images)

Hezbollah Is in Venezuela to Stay

Regime change in Caracas won’t change the country’s problematic relationship with the terrorist group.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks to the press in Caracas on Jan. 31. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

Inside the U.S. decision to get behind Congo’s election and how the United States failed Afghan women.

Supporters of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro rally in Caracas on Jan. 23. (Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Should Put the Safety of American Diplomats First

By failing to prioritize the security of U.S. officials in Venezuela, the White House bungled what could have been a rare foreign-policy success.

The opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks during a meeting with deputies, media, and supporters, organized by the National Assembly, at Plaza Bolívar de Chacao in Caracas on Jan. 25. (Edilzon Gamez/Getty Images)

Maduro’s Power in Venezuela Seems Stable, for Now

Despite the recognition by a wave of countries of the opposition leader Juan Guaidó as president, Maduro’s patronage of the military insulates him from the need to negotiate.

Venezuelan National Assembly head Juan Guaidó declares himself the country's acting president in Caracas on Jan. 23. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Venezuelan Opposition Leader Declares Himself President, With Trump Backing

National Assembly President Juan Guaidó promptly won the support of the U.S. and other countries. But will the military throw its weight behind him or Nicolás Maduro?

A Venezuelan family at the Simon Bolivar International Bridge in the Colombian border city of Cucuta on January 10. (Schneyder Mendoza/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s Why Colombia Opened Its Arms to Venezuelan Migrants—Until Now

For years, Colombians fleeing violence left for Venezuela. Now mass migration flows the other way.

President Jair Bolsonaro waves a Brazilian flag while addressing supporters during his inauguration ceremony in Brasilia on Jan. 1, 2019. (Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Love Affair With Diplomacy Is Dead

A leader in liberal internationalism is about to turn its back on the world.

Worshipers at an evangelical church in Brasília, Brazil, on Sept. 21, 2018, pray for the recovery of then-presidential contender Jair Bolsonaro after he was injured in a knife attack. (Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro’s Christian Coalition Remains Precarious

A loose alliance of Catholic and evangelical conservatives helped Brazil’s new president to power. But their continued support is far from certain.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez addresses supporters during a campaign rally on August 3, 2012. (JUAN BARRETO/AFP/GettyImages)

Chávez’s Real Legacy Is Disaster

It's easy to blame Maduro, but the seeds of calamity were sown by his predecessor.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro walks with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 7, 2015. (Andy Wong/Getty Images)

How to Respond to Chinese Investment in Latin America

The United States can compete without making things worse.

Water is released from the floodgates of the Xiaolangdi dam on the Yellow River near Luoyang, China on June 29, 2016. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

The Beautiful Rivers—And the Dammed

Advances in solar and wind power mean that hydropower is no longer the only renewable game in town—and that’s good news for the world’s rivers.

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