South Asia

ForeignPolicy__Caste2

Feeling Like an Outcast

The bestselling book “Caste” brilliantly frames racial hierarchies in the United States but largely ignores the horrors of India’s caste structure.

Then Vice President Joe Biden talks with Sen. Kamala Harris and her aunt, Sarala Gopalan, during a swearing-in ceremony at the Capitol on Jan. 3, 2016.

The Importance of Kamala Harris’s South Asian Heritage

The media often underplays the fact that Biden’s vice presidential pick has an Indian mother. Her heritage could play a crucial role in U.S. foreign policy.

A Kashmiri boy looks out from his damaged family house after cross border shelling.

Kashmiris Lament the Loss of Their Youth

While much of India opened up to the world after the country’s 1991 reforms, Kashmir instead became the world’s most militarized zone. A generation of young people have suffered.

Indian security forces stand guard at a roadblock.

Kashmir’s Year of Hopelessness

One year on from New Delhi’s decision to revoke Kashmir’s autonomous privileges, the region remains ignored and underinvested. It’s difficult to see what could change the status quo.

The flags of the United States and India adorn a conference table during a meeting between representatives of the two countries.

India and the United States Need Each Other Mostly Because of China

Just 50 years ago, Washington was trying to intimidate New Delhi so it could cozy up to Beijing. China’s rise has brought the world’s two largest democracies closer.

Sri Lanka migrants bound for Australia remain on their boat despite it being washed ashore.

For Sri Lankan Refugees, a Free and Fair Australia Is a Myth

A murder mystery is an indictment of Australia’s draconian immigration policy that has left many legitimate asylum-seekers detained, deported, or dead.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo shakes hands with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during their meeting at the prime minister's residence in New Delhi, India, on June 26, 2019.

To Fight China, India Needs to Forget Russia

The best way for New Delhi to modernize its military and protect itself from Beijing’s aggression is to forget its old relationship with Moscow and build closer ties to Washington.

Load 10 More Articles