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Sheep shearing in Australia in 1886.
Sheep shearing in Australia in 1886.

What a 19th-Century Shearer Can Teach Us About Korean-Australian Relations

People-to-people interactions are longer and deeper than the pair’s state relations.

South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol waves a national flag during a celebration of the 77th National Liberation Day in Seoul on Aug. 15.
South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol waves a national flag during a celebration of the 77th National Liberation Day in Seoul on Aug. 15.

Yoon’s Strong Start in Foreign Policy

Despite domestic setbacks, the new South Korean president’s diplomacy has been a success.

South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol greets a soccer player.
South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol greets a soccer player.
A person walks past a grid of mostly domestic movie posters in Seoul in 2006.
A person walks past a grid of mostly domestic movie posters in Seoul in 2006.

South Korea’s Film Rules Need a Reboot

The success of productions such as “Squid Game” and “Parasite” prove the industry can hold its own without excessive protectionism.

U.S. President Joe Biden sits with South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.
U.S. President Joe Biden sits with South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

As Security Threats Mount, Japan and South Korea Begin (Carefully) Mending Fences

Prodded by Washington, Seoul and Tokyo are taking steps to overcome deep historical tensions.

A close-up of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's head
A close-up of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's head

Pyongyang’s Not Picking Up the Phone

Seoul and Washington have pledged they’re ready to talk with a nuclear-testing North Korea—but they’re not getting any response.

South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol with U.S. President Joe Biden
South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol with U.S. President Joe Biden

South Korea’s Conservatives Aren’t Any Tougher on China or North Korea Than Liberals

The new Yoon administration will stick to the same line Seoul always follows.

People watch a television screen showing a North Korean military parade.
People watch a television screen showing a North Korean military parade.
People hold candles during a rally to protest the Russian invasion of Ukraine near the Russian Embassy in Seoul on March 4.
People hold candles during a rally to protest the Russian invasion of Ukraine near the Russian Embassy in Seoul on March 4.

South Korea Must Pick a Side

Russia’s war in Ukraine has shown the “shrimp among whales” that hedging is no longer a viable foreign policy.

South Korean President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol gestures during a ceremony at the National Assembly Library in Seoul on March 10.
South Korean President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol gestures during a ceremony at the National Assembly Library in Seoul on March 10.

South Korea’s New President Understands the Threat From Pyongyang

Yoon Suk-yeol’s victory tightens the alliance with Washington.

A pastor speaks during a online Christmas service from the Yoido Full Gospel Church on December 25, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea.
A pastor speaks during a online Christmas service from the Yoido Full Gospel Church on December 25, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea.

A Lame-Duck Moon Can Fix South Korea’s Refugee Failings

Persecuted Chinese Christians deserve asylum from Seoul.

South Korean President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol of the main opposition People Power Party celebrates with supporters at the party's headquarters in Seoul.
South Korean President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol of the main opposition People Power Party celebrates with supporters at the party's headquarters in Seoul.

Misogyny and Real Estate Tax Produced Conservative Victory in South Korea

Five years after Park Geun-hye’s expulsion, a narrow win for the Korean right.

A man looks at posters ahead of South Korea's presidential election.
A man looks at posters ahead of South Korea's presidential election.

South Korea Wants to Be a Player, Not a Bystander

With elections close, a rising country considers its place in the world.

Lee Jae-myung and Yoon Seok-youl stand side by side in front of podiums; both wear face masks.
Lee Jae-myung and Yoon Seok-youl stand side by side in front of podiums; both wear face masks.

Why South Korea’s Presidential Election Matters to the U.S.

It’s the first in recent memory to feature substantive foreign-policy differences between the ruling and opposition camps.

Yoon Suk-yeol and Lee Jae-myung shake hands.
Yoon Suk-yeol and Lee Jae-myung shake hands.
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