South Korea

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) bids farewell to South Korean President Moon Jae-in (R) on Moon's departure from North Korea at Samjiyon airport on September 20, 2018 in Samjiyon, North Korea. (Photo by Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images)

South Korea Is an Ally, Not a Puppet

Washington's image of Seoul is stuck in the 1970s. It's time to move on.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his wife, Ri Sol Ju, pose with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and his wife, Kim Jung-sook, on the top of Mount Paektu on Sept. 20. (Photo by Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images)

Washington Scrambles to Slow Seoul’s Roll

The United States is worried North Korea will pocket goodies from its southern neighbor without giving up its nukes.

(Illustration by Penguin Lab for Foreign Policy)

China’s Pop Idols Are Too Soft for the Party

Stars like Kris Wu are huge with fans, but sit uncomfortably with macho ambitions.

U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, left, shakes hands with South Korean Defense Minister Song Young-moo before their meeting in Seoul on June 28.

Few Signs of Progress on Denuclearization as U.S., South Korea Cancel Another Major Military Exercise

Current and former U.S. officials say North Korea is dragging its heels, but Seoul and Pyongyang are still talking.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in (C) attends the 70th anniversary of Armed Forces Day at the War Memorial in Seoul on Oct. 1. (Photo by Jeon Heon-Kyun-Pool/Getty Images)

Democrats Need More Than Hot Air on North Korea

Moon Jae-in is trying for peace on the peninsula. Liberals should have his back.

Tourists walk with their luggage at Beijing International Airport on Nov. 24, 2016. ( Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese Tourists Are Beijing’s Newest Economic Weapon

Palau is the latest nation to find that offending China means empty hotels.

Steam and exhaust rise from different companies on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Oberhausen, Germany.

The Paris Accord Won’t Stop Global Warming on Its Own

The world needs a new alliance of green economic powers to create a low-carbon economic zone.

Anti-immigration activists attend a protest against a group of asylum-seekers from Yemen, in Seoul on June 30, 2018. (ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

South Korea Is Going Crazy Over a Handful of Refugees

Feminists, the young, and Islamophobes have allied against desperate Yemenis.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with North Korean official Kim Yong Chol at the White House on June 1. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Washington Has to Learn Pyongyang’s Rules

Negotiating with North Korea is a tricky game, and the United States is already behind.

This photo taken on July 5, 2018 shows players from North (red) and South Korea (blue) competing during a friendly men's basketball match at the Ryugyong Chung Ju-Yung Indoor Stadium in Pyongyang. (KIM WON-JIN/AFP/Getty Images)

A Black Korean in Pyongyang

Ethnic identity is the latest issue to split the two Koreas.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and aides in Pyongyang on July 6. (Andrew Harnik/AFP/Getty Images)

The Singapore Honeymoon Is Over

Trump in Singapore was spectacle. Pompeo in Pyongyang is the grim reality.

U.S. President Donald Trump (C), Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R), and South Korean President Moon Jae-in (L) pose for photos before attending the Northeast Asia Security Dinner at the U.S. Consulate General   in Hamburg, Germany, July 6, 2017.

With North Korea, Good Intentions Aren’t Enough

Trump's unilateral negotiating strategy will fail unless the United States collaborates with its regional allies — and adversaries — to forge a lasting peace.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sign documents as U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and the North Korean leader's sister, Kim Yo Jong, look on in Singapore on June 12, 2018.

Total Denuclearization Is an Unattainable Goal. Here’s How to Reduce the North Korean Threat.

The United States and South Korea must help Pyongyang convert its military nuclear complex for civilian use.

U.S. President Donald Trump and National Security Advisor John Bolton during a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House on May 22. (Oliver Contreras-Pool/Getty Images)

Singapore Was John Bolton’s Worst Nightmare

U.S. President Donald Trump’s national security advisor was marginalized at the summit, but his hard-nosed approach will be essential to dismantling North Korea’s nukes.

Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, right, greats North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 10. (Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s How the Trump-Kim Summit Could Play Out

No one knows for sure what will happen in Singapore. These are some of the possibilities.

A Ford factory in Kentucky on Oct. 27, 2017. Ford invested in factory upgrades to make all-new, heavier vehicles for a booming U.S. market. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

Trump Dials Up the Trade War to 11

Citing national security concerns, the Trump administration could slap tariffs on autos from friends and allies. They’re not thrilled.

David Beasley, the executive director of the World Food Program, briefs reporters in Seoul, South Korea, on May 15 on his visit to North Korea. (Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images)

White House Rebuffs U.N. Appeal to Expand North Korea Food Aid

The United States sees private investment in Pyongyang, not aid, as the nuclear deal’s prize.

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