South Korea

South Korean protesters sit near a statue of a teenage girl symbolizing former "comfort women", who served as sex slaves for Japanese soldiers during World War II, during a weekly anti-Japanese demonstration in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul on November 21, 2018.

Tokyo Keeps Defending World War II Atrocities

Japan's legal excuses over slave labor are weak at best.

Senior advisor Jared Kushner poses for a selfie in the White House Rose on May 16.

Kushner’s Middle East Peace Plan Goes on Tour

Plus: Macron and Merkel remain divided over EU leadership, and the other stories we're following today.

People walk across carpeting with the EU flag  at the German Christian Democrats (CDU) headquarters during European Parliament elections on May 26 in Berlin, Germany.

Leaders Meet Over EU’s Future

Plus: Netanyahu faces a deadline to form a coalition, a mass stabbing in Japan, and what to watch in the world this week.

In this picture taken on March 15, 2018, local resident Truong Thi Hong, 76, looks at the names of relatives killed during the My Lai massacre at the war memorial museum in Son My village, Quang Ngai province.

America Loves Excusing Its War Criminals

Bitter memories of impunity for U.S. soldiers still rankle even close allies.

Investors watch market figures in Nanjing, China, at a stock exchange hall on May 20.

Fear of Prolonged U.S.-China Trade War Rattles Markets

Some financial analysts warned that if trade talks between the countries collapse—and tariffs remain high—the global economy could move toward recession.

The pop star Seungri, implicated in an abuse scandal, arrives at a Seoul police station on March 14.

South Korea’s Darkest Clubs Are Being Dragged Into the Light

The Burning Sun investigation has exposed horrors against women—and men getting away with it.

South Koreans participate in a funeral service for Kim Bok-dong, 92, a former so-called comfort woman, in Seoul on Feb. 1.

Japan and South Korea’s History Wars Are About to Get Ugly

As Seoul targets Japanese businesses, hopes that pragmatism would prevail seem all but erased.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in talks on the phone with U.S. President Donald Trump at the presidential Blue House on February 28, 2019 in Seoul. (Photo by South Korean Presidential Blue House via Getty Images)

Moon Jae-in Is the Grown-Up at the Table

Stuck between Trump and Kim, the South Korean president is still showing the way forward.

Seungri (C), a former member of the K-pop boy group BIGBANG, bows as he arrives for questioning over criminal allegations at the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency in Seoul on March 14. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

K-Pop’s Sexual Assault Scandal Is the Tip of the Iceberg

Celebrities’ crimes are pushing South Korea’s reckoning with misogyny.

U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (L) sit during their second summit meeting at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel on February 28, 2019 in Hanoi, Vietnam.  (Photo by Vietnam News Agency/Handout/Getty Images)

Everything Should Be on the Table in Korea

Failure in Hanoi reinforces the need for bolder future commitments to peace.

A man wearing a Make Korea Great Again hat stands near conservative pro-U.S. demonstrators during a rally denouncing government policies toward North Korea in Seoul on March 1. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Failure in Hanoi Doesn’t Mean Peace Is Dead

The foundations need to be laid for a long, hard route ahead.

U.S. soldiers from the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, take part in the Warrior Strike VIII exercise at the Rodriguez Range in Pocheon, South Korea, on Sept. 19, 2017. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

The U.S. Can Afford a Peace Deal in Korea

Opponents of an end-of-war declaration are sorely mistaken.

American prisoners of war captured by North Korean forces await liberation at the 38th parallel on Oct. 5, 1950. (Soviet Photo Agency/Bettmann/Getty Images)

Brainwashed

A new book on interrogation during the Korean War sheds light on how the 20th century imagined prisoners of war.

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) bids farewell to South Korean President Moon Jae-in (R) on Moon's departure from North Korea at Samjiyon airport on September 20, 2018 in Samjiyon, North Korea. (Photo by Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images)

South Korea Is an Ally, Not a Puppet

Washington's image of Seoul is stuck in the 1970s. It's time to move on.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his wife, Ri Sol Ju, pose with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and his wife, Kim Jung-sook, on the top of Mount Paektu on Sept. 20. (Photo by Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images)

Washington Scrambles to Slow Seoul’s Roll

The United States is worried North Korea will pocket goodies from its southern neighbor without giving up its nukes.

(Illustration by Penguin Lab for Foreign Policy)

China’s Pop Idols Are Too Soft for the Party

Stars like Kris Wu are huge with fans, but sit uncomfortably with macho ambitions.

U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, left, shakes hands with South Korean Defense Minister Song Young-moo before their meeting in Seoul on June 28.

Few Signs of Progress on Denuclearization as U.S., South Korea Cancel Another Major Military Exercise

Current and former U.S. officials say North Korea is dragging its heels, but Seoul and Pyongyang are still talking.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in (C) attends the 70th anniversary of Armed Forces Day at the War Memorial in Seoul on Oct. 1. (Photo by Jeon Heon-Kyun-Pool/Getty Images)

Democrats Need More Than Hot Air on North Korea

Moon Jae-in is trying for peace on the peninsula. Liberals should have his back.

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