South Sudan

Trainee soldiers attend a reconciliation program in South Sudan.

U.S. Quietly Gives Up on South Sudan War Crimes Court

Six years after Washington gave $5 million to set up a war crimes court, nothing has happened.

Soldiers in the South Sudan People’s Defence Forces guard the John Garang Mausoleum during the country’s 10th anniversary independence celebrations in Juba on July 9.

South Sudan’s Lost Decade

Ten years after independence, Africa’s youngest country remains mired in conflict and poverty.

Salva Kiir, then-acting president of the government of Southern Sudan

Succession in South Sudan

America’s greatest success story in Africa has degenerated into its biggest failure.

A Sudanese asylum-seeker talks during an interview in the southern part of Tel Aviv where thousands of them live, on Oct. 25.

The Kafkaesque World of Sudanese Refugees in Israel

Aid organizations fear that Israel is about to deport thousands of asylum-seekers to Sudan now that the two countries have made peace.

People walk in front of Ethiopian flags marking the new Ethiopian Millennium on Sept. 10, 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Ethiopia’s Government and the TPLF Leadership Are Not Morally Equivalent

The leaders of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front are seeking to manipulate the international community into backing a power-sharing deal that grants it impunity for past crimes and gives it far more future influence over the country than it deserves.

A member of the Syrian relief group Violet Organization disinfects tents

The Next Wave

U.N. and relief agencies warn the coronavirus pandemic could leave an even bigger path of destruction in the world’s most vulnerable and conflict-riven countries.

A woman carries goods near U.N. peacekeepers in South Sudan.

Diplomats Fear a Collapse of South Sudan’s Latest Peace Deal

Even as they publicly support the pact, many privately think it is built on a house of cards and will be pulled down by the country’s bloody past.

Locusts take flight from ground vegetation as young girls run toward their cattle at Larisoro village near Archers Post, Kenya, on Jan. 21.

Top U.S. Aid Chief Warns of Locust Devastation in East Africa

“You really have to go back to decades ago in the U.S., to Dust Bowl days, to understand just how devastating this can be.”

South Sudan's President Salva Kiir arrives at Juba international airpor

South Sudan’s Proposed Unity Government Is Still Divided

Another delay won’t help achieve lasting peace. What the world’s youngest country needs is an exit strategy for its old-guard leaders.

Newly released child soldiers stand with rifles during their release ceremony in Yambio, South Sudan, on Feb. 7, 2018.

Foreign Investors Fueled Violence and Corruption in South Sudan, Report Finds

Numerous banks and multinationals have hands in shady deals with the new nation’s elites and warlords.

A man carries South Sudan's national flag at Mangateen Internal Displaced persons (IDPs) center during the visit of South Sudan's vice president in Juba on Nov. 17, 2018.

The Old Guard Are Killing the World’s Youngest Country

South Sudan was born amid great hope but has since descended into war. It will take a new generation of leaders to make it a successful state.

Personnel in the South Sudan People's Defence Forces, formerly named the Sudan People's Liberation Army, take part in a drill at their barracks south of Juba, South Sudan, on April 26. (Alex McBride/AFP/Getty Images)

Former U.S. Diplomats Lobby to Stop South Sudan War Crimes Court

The move sparked anger among experts, who see the court as critical to peace.

South Sudanese anti-government forces display ammunition which they say was confiscated from government forces during fighting in September, in Panyume, South Sudan. (Sumy Sadurni/AFP/Getty Images)

How European and Chinese Arms Diverted to South Sudan Fueled Its Civil War

A new study, four years in the making, details the secret global supply chain sidestepping international arms embargoes on South Sudan.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Sri Lanka’s newly appointed prime minister, Mahinda Rajapaksa (center), signs a document during a ceremony to assume duties at the prime minister’s office in Colombo on Oct. 29. (Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images)

Halfway Isn’t Good Enough on Human Rights

Myanmar and Sri Lanka were praised for minimal progress. Now it’s all falling apart.

South Sudanese await the arrival of South Sudan's president, Salva Kiir, in Juba after peace talks in Ethiopia on June 22. (Akuot Chol/AFP/Getty Images)

Remember South Sudan? Washington Would Prefer Not to

Its freedom fighters have turned into brutal oppressors, and it is near to becoming another failed state, despondent U.S. supporters say.

Family members shout slogans as they wait outside the Kobar prison in north Khartoum to welcome their loved ones after Sudan released dozens of opposition activists Feb. 18 who were arrested in January when authorities cracked down on protests against rising food prices. (Ebrahim Hamid/AFP/Getty Images)

Sanctions Against Sudan Didn’t Harm an Oppressive Government — They Helped It

The end of economic isolation hasn’t brought a financial windfall or more freedom. Instead, the regime is as strong as ever while ordinary people suffer.

An Ethiopian U.N. peacekeeper patrols the Amiet Market in Abyei. The market has become the largest trading hub in the region and a symbol of peace between the Misseriya nomads from Sudan and the Ngok Dinka from South Sudan. Local leaders use the market to resolve issues of conflict and are working together to bring stability to the area, which has been contested for more than ten years.

Conflict in Abyei Could Reignite South Sudan’s Civil War

If the U.N. withdraws peacekeepers from a long-contested oil-rich enclave, it's likely to spark further fighting in an already unstable region.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., tours a U.S.-funded supermarket in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan on May 21, 2017.  (Raad Adayleh/AFP/Getty Images)

Haley: Vote With U.S. at U.N. or We’ll Cut Your Aid

In a proposed aid overhaul, Nikki Haley embraces an “America first” foreign policy.

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