Spain

Protesters chant, "No extradition," as they rally against the controversial extradition law proposal in Hong Kong on June 9.

Hong Kong’s Last Stand

Plus: Mexico faces new pressure on immigration, Germany meets with Iran, and what to watch in the world this week.

People chat in front of a mural depicting Iran's flag of Iran, in Tehran, Iran on May 22.

Mixed Messages on Iran

Plus: Stocks fall again amid trade war, Netanyahu misses his government deadline, and the other stories we're following today.

Senior advisor Jared Kushner poses for a selfie in the White House Rose on May 16.

Kushner’s Middle East Peace Plan Goes on Tour

Plus: Macron and Merkel remain divided over EU leadership, and the other stories we're following today.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo briefed lawmakers on the Iran threat, May 21, 2019.

United States Sticks to Iran Deterrence

Plus: Theresa May's "new deal," Sudan's protesters on strike, and the other stories we're following today.

Spanish conservative People's Party leader  Pablo Casado (C), secretary general Teodoro García Egea (L), and the party's number two candidate Adolfo Suárez Illana (R) attend an election night gathering in Madrid after Spain held general elections on Apr. 28.

Pablo Casado Was Meant to Save Spain’s Center-Right. He Destroyed It.

Spain’s conservatives lost more than half their seats in parliament by trying to outbid the far-right.

Candidate from Spanish far-right party Vox, Santiago Abascal, waves to supporters during a campaign rally in Seville on April 24 ahead of the April 28 general election. (Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images)

Make Spain Great Again

The far-right Vox party has adopted Trump-style politics.

Santiago Abascal, the leader of the far-right party Vox arrives to a rally at Palacios de Congresos on Apr. 17 in Granada, Spain.

Spain’s Vox Party Hates Muslims—Except the Ones Who Fund It

The upstart far-right party is unapologetically Islamophobic, but without donations from Iranian exiles, it may have never gotten off the ground.

A migrant rides a bike past greenhouses in El Ejido, Spain, on Jan. 14.

Inside Spain’s Electoral Hothouse

The country’s agricultural heartland prepares for a possible Vox victory.

From left, People’s Party leader Pablo Casado, Spain’s Prime Minister and Socialist Party leader Pedro Sánchez, Ciudadanos party leader Albert Rivera, and Podemos party leader Pablo Iglesias attend a debate in Madrid on April 22 as candidates for Spain’s general elections. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Spain’s Political Deadlock Is Forever

The country’s snap election on April 28, its third in five years, may just be the prelude to another down the line.

People protesting against a new government measure to further restrict abortions in Poland gather as part of "Black Friday" demonstrations nationwide on March 23, 2018 in Poznan, Poland. The women's rights group Dziewuchy Dziewuchom, called on women across Poland to gather for protests in cities nationwide.

Politics Without Parties

From Poland to Iceland, citizens’ groups are taking matters into their own hands and bringing about genuine political change from outside the party system.

Supporters of the right-wing People’s Party attend the party’s campaign kickoff on April 11 in Madrid. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Is Spain Heading for an Electoral Wreck?

In this month’s election, the choice could boil down to a government influenced by a xenophobic party or one under constant threats by separatists.

The flags of the United Kingdom, Gibraltar, and the European Union are flown with the Rock of Gibraltar in the background at the Spain-Gibraltar border on April 4, 2017. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Gibraltar Will Never Accept Shared Sovereignty

The Spanish government seems to think the British overseas territory will sacrifice its sovereignty for the sake of convenience after Brexit. It is wrong.

A fisherman holds a Spanish flag during a protest in the bay of Algeciras, near the Rock of Gibraltar, on August 18, 2013.

As Brexit Looms, the Rock Is in a Hard Place

In Gibraltar, a British territory, 96 percent of the population voted against Brexit, but they are also adamantly opposed to joint rule by Spain. It might be time to reconsider.

A migrant rides a bike past greenhouses on January 14, 2019. In southern Spain, the far-right party Vox has attracted farmers with its pledge to deport illegal workers.

Spanish Nationalists Hate Separatists, Not Immigrants

Spain has long resisted the rise of the far-right, because Basque and Catalan separatism animated nationalist passions—but the rise of Vox in Andalusia shows that the country is not immune from xenophobic politics.

Spanish prime minister Pedro Sánchez (L) and Catalan regional president Joaquim Torra at the funeral of Spanish opera singer Montserrat Caballe in Barcelona on Oct. 8, 2018.

An Independent Catalonia Is Further Away Than Ever

New leadership in Madrid and Barcelona seemed to offer hope of a resolution to the Catalan secession crisis. But both sides are digging in rather than making compromises.

Enric Marco stands beside a Spanish Republican flag at Mauthausen, a concentration camp in Austria, in May 2003. (Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images)

The Spanish Fraud

On the podcast: Javier Cercas’s new book on the man who impersonated a Holocaust survivor.

People make the fascist salute at La Basilica The Valley of Fallen in San Lorenzo del Escorial near Madrid on July 15, 2018, as they protest against the removal of Franco's remains from The Valley of Fallen. (JAVIER SORIANO / AFP)

Spain’s Dictator Is Dead, but the Debate About Him Lives On

Francisco Franco ran Spain with an iron fist for decades—and created myths about his rule that are only now starting to come undone.

The first migrants from the Aquarius, a ship that was turned away by Italy and Malta sparking a major migration row in Europe, disembarked at the Spanish port of Valencia on June 17, 2018.

Spain Rescued a Ship. It Won’t Rescue Europe.

The new Spanish prime minister has refused to follow Italy in a race to the bottom, but that doesn’t mean that Madrid will lead the EU to adopt more humane migration policies.

Catalan Socialist party candidate Miquel Iceta (L) and Spanish Socialist party leader Pedro Sánchez attend a campaign meeting in Barcelona on December 17, 2017.

Can Pedro Sánchez Put Spain Back Together Again?

The 2017 crisis in Catalonia tore the country apart. The new Spanish prime minister will need to fend off rivals and manage alliances to stay in power long enough to heal the wounds.

Leader of 'Ciudadanos' (Citizens) political party, Albert Rivera in Madrid on February 7, 2018. (PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)

Why Spain’s Top Populist Is a Centrist

Albert Rivera is tearing down his country’s establishment from the middle. Just don't call him Spain's Emmanuel Macron.

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