Sudan

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

Omar al-Bashir appears during a rally with his supporters in the Green Square in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Sharaf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

It Takes a Village to Make a Monster

Omar al-Bashir is gone—but he was never the key to Sudan’s oppression to begin with.

Sudanese demonstrators protest outside the army headquarters in Khartoum on April 12. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

FP’s latest on the turmoil in Sudan, Benjamin Netanyahu’s re-election, and Julian Assange’s arrest.

Sudanese demonstrators gather in central Khartoum after the toppling of President Omar al-Bashir on April 11. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

In Sudan, a Transition to Democracy or a Military Power Play?

Omar al-Bashir’s three-decade rule is over, but demonstrators reject the army’s plan.

Sudanese protesters wave a national flag atop a military vehicle next to soldiers near military headquarters in Khartoum, Sudan, on April 7. (AFP/Getty Images)

How Two U.S. Presidents Reshaped America’s Policy Toward Sudan

As thousands protest the Bashir regime, Washington has helped legitimize it.

الجزائريين يحتجون على ترشح بوتفليقة في الجزائر اليوم الجمعة ١ مارس.

الربيع العربي لم ينته بعد

روح الربيع العربي لا تزال مستمرة كما أظهرت الاحتجاجات الكبيرة في الجزائر والسودان.

Algerians chant slogans and wave national flags during a rally against ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's bid for a fifth term in the capital Algiers on March 1. (Ryad Kramdi/AFP/Getty Images)

The Arab Spring Is Not Over Yet

Major protests in Algeria and Sudan show that the spirit of 2011 lives on.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad meets with Sudanese counterpart Omar al-Bashir in Damascus on January 12, 2008.

Shame on the Arabs

Many Arab rulers have revealed their moral bankruptcy by rekindling ties with Syria and embracing a war criminal.

President Omar al-Bashir appears at a rally with his supporters in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is the Uprising Sudan’s Genocidal Dictator Always Feared

The country’s current protests include all sections of society—and may soon topple Omar al-Bashir’s entire regime.

Newly released child soldiers wait in a line for their registration during the release ceremony in Yambio, South Sudan, on February 7, 2018.(STEFANIE GLINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

When Soldiers Go Back to Being Children

The unlikely success of Sudan and the FARC proves minors can be protected from conflict.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Sudanese Foreign Minister Al-Dirdiri Mohamed Ahmed gives a press conference in Khartoum on June 24. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Administration Gives Sudan a Way to Come in From the Cold

The United States should stop listing Sudan as a state sponsor of terrorism, Sudanese foreign minister tells FP, as Khartoum seeks to boost its crumbling economy.

Family members shout slogans as they wait outside the Kobar prison in north Khartoum to welcome their loved ones after Sudan released dozens of opposition activists Feb. 18 who were arrested in January when authorities cracked down on protests against rising food prices. (Ebrahim Hamid/AFP/Getty Images)

Sanctions Against Sudan Didn’t Harm an Oppressive Government — They Helped It

The end of economic isolation hasn’t brought a financial windfall or more freedom. Instead, the regime is as strong as ever while ordinary people suffer.

An Ethiopian U.N. peacekeeper patrols the Amiet Market in Abyei. The market has become the largest trading hub in the region and a symbol of peace between the Misseriya nomads from Sudan and the Ngok Dinka from South Sudan. Local leaders use the market to resolve issues of conflict and are working together to bring stability to the area, which has been contested for more than ten years.

Conflict in Abyei Could Reignite South Sudan’s Civil War

If the U.N. withdraws peacekeepers from a long-contested oil-rich enclave, it's likely to spark further fighting in an already unstable region.

Asylum seekers in a demo against the deportations to Rwanda in from of Rwanda embassy in Herzelia

For Once We Were Strangers

In Israel, thousands of Eritrean and Sudanese asylum-seekers are stuck in limbo. Photographer Kobi Wolf documents a national crisis.

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, currently under construction, on May 15, 2016.  (DigitalGlobe via Getty Images)

Egypt-Sudan Spat Muddies Prospects for Deal on Big Nile Dam

Talks are stalled over how to deal with the impact of a $5 billion dam that could threaten Egypt’s lifeblood.

A picture taken on August 3, 2017 shows Sudanese foreign minister Ibrahim Ghandour (L) attending a meeting with his Egyptian counterpart (unseen) in the capital Khartoum. / AFP PHOTO / Ashraf SHAZLY        (Photo credit should read ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)

Sudan Hopes for Sanctions Repeal as Deadline Looms

Khartoum hopes to get a permanent lifting of sanctions now that it’s playing ball with Washington in the fight on terror.

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17:  Senate Armed Services Committee member Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) arrives for hearing about the Pentagon budget in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill March 17, 2016 in Washington, DC. Although Congress controls the Department of Defense's budget, members of the committee were critical of leadership's decisions on readiness spending and cuts to other programs.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

GOP Senator Blocks Plans to Fill Africa Post at State Department

A lone Republican lawmaker is threatening to hold up the Trump administration’s pick for the next assistant secretary for Africa.

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