Syria

Eliot Higgins in December 2018. (Claudia Leisinger for Foreign Policy)

How Citizen Journalists Solved the Mystery of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17

On the podcast: The founder of the group Bellingcat on using open sources to investigate war crimes and abuses.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to Federica Mogherini, the European Union's foreign-policy chief, in Munich on Feb. 7, 2015. (Christof Stache/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Doesn’t Even Agree on Assad Anymore

The latest issue to divide the EU is whether to recognize the legitimacy of Syria’s dictator and help him rebuild his country.

A tent in Manisa, Turkey, in which a Syrian refugee family lives is pictured in May 2016. (Valerio Muscella/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

From Refugee to Resident

Displaced people may live in host countries for decades. Here’s how to manage their stays.

الجزائريين يحتجون على ترشح بوتفليقة في الجزائر اليوم الجمعة ١ مارس.

الربيع العربي لم ينته بعد

روح الربيع العربي لا تزال مستمرة كما أظهرت الاحتجاجات الكبيرة في الجزائر والسودان.

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech under the rain during celebrations for Navy Day in Baltiysk in the Kaliningrad region on July 26, 2015.

Don’t Believe the Russian Hype

Moscow’s missile capabilities in the Baltic Sea region are not nearly as dangerous as they seem.

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump greet members of the U.S. military during a stop at Ramstein Air Base in Germany, on Dec. 27, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

400 American Troops Can’t Do Anything

If the president wants to withdraw from Syria, he might as well just withdraw.

Renu Begum, the eldest sister of Shamima Begum, holds a photo of her teen sister, who fled to Syria to join the Islamic State, as she is interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard in London on Feb. 22, 2015. (Laura Lean/Getty Images)

Teenage Terrorists Aren’t Lost Forever

Even ISIS recruits can be reintegrated into society, if the approach is right.

Men suspected of being Islamic State fighters wait to be searched by members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces after leaving the group's last holdout of Baghouz, Syria, on Feb. 22. (Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

What Comes After ISIS?

The United States is good at using military might to defeat terrorists—but without a plan for clean, competent governance in areas once ruled by the Islamic State, the threat will remain.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton (right) listens to President Donald Trump talk to reporters during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington on Feb. 12. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

How John Bolton Won the Beltway Battle Over Syria

Instead of the full withdrawal the president promised, the United States will leave several hundred troops in Syria.

Workers clean the beach of the coastal town of Zouk Mosbeh, north of Beirut, on Jan. 23, 2018, as garbage washed ashore after stormy weather. (Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Facing an Economic and Environmental Disaster

Rather than rushing to punish Hezbollah, the United States should be shoring up the country’s new government to avoid state collapse.

Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as La Bestia in Las Patronas, Veracruz state, Mexico, to travel through Mexico to reach the United States on Aug. 9, 2018. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Isn’t Helping Refugees. It’s Depriving Them of Their Rights.

The humanitarian visas offered to migrants don’t allow them to work, study, or receive benefits while letting the Mexican government duck its responsibilities under international law.

Members of the mostly Kurdish People’s Protection Units, part of the Syrian Democratic Forces, gather in the Syrian town of Shadadi on Sept. 11, 2018. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Kurdish Commander Laments American Betrayal, Urges U.S. to ‘Be Loyal’

Trump’s plan to withdraw troops from Syria leaves U.S. ally at the mercy of old enemies.

An election campaign poster bearing a portrait of President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus on May 18, 2014. (Louai Bashara/AFP/Getty Images)

A Deadly Welcome Awaits Syria’s Returning Refugees

As the war in Syria dies down, the torture and mistreatment of returnees are ramping up.

United Nations personnel stand at a lookout point as they monitor the Israel-Syria border in the  Golan Heights, on Jan. 21, 2019.

Israel’s Occupation of the Golan Heights Is Illegal and Dangerous

A recent article argued the Golan should remain Israeli forever. That would reward aggression and set a dangerous international precedent.

Ilham Ahmed, co-chair of the Syrian Democratic Council, delivers a speech in Paris on Dec. 21, 2018. (Stephane De Sakuyin/AFP/Getty Images)

Syrian Kurdish Leader Asks U.S. to Save Her People From ‘Catastrophe’

As Assad consolidates power, Kurds want autonomy in northeastern Syria.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walks with U.S. President Donald Trump during a break in their historic summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Don’t Let Democrats Become the Party of War

In their zeal to oppose any policy associated with Trump, the Democratic Party’s leaders in Congress are starting to sound like warmongers.

A U.S. Marine prepares to board an MV-22 Osprey on his way to a site near al-Tanf Garrison, Syria, on Sept. 7, 2018. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Carlos Lopez)

How U.S. Mission Creep in Syria and Iraq Could Trigger War With Iran

One previously unreported incident from 2017 illustrates the risks of Trump’s latest plan.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad meets with Sudanese counterpart Omar al-Bashir in Damascus on January 12, 2008.

Shame on the Arabs

Many Arab rulers have revealed their moral bankruptcy by rekindling ties with Syria and embracing a war criminal.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu (R), and Syrian Armed Forces' chief of staff Ali Abdullah Ayyoub (L) inspecting a military parade in the northwestern Syrian province of Latakia.

What Putin Really Wants in Syria

Russia never sought to be a small-time fixer in the Middle East. Its goal was to reclaim its status as a global power broker.

Members of Russian and Syrian forces stand guard near posters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, at the Abu Duhur crossing on the eastern edge of Idlib province on Aug. 20, 2018. (George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images)

The Unintended Consequences of Trump’s Decision to Withdraw From Syria

It has already empowered Russia and Iran while undermining the Kurds.

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