technology

Chinese pedestrians walk past a Huawei store in Beijing on Jan. 29. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

We Can’t Tell if Chinese Firms Work for the Party

Huawei claims to be an independent firm, but China's own laws mandate a different reality.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks to the press in Caracas on Jan. 31. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

Inside the U.S. decision to get behind Congo’s election and how the United States failed Afghan women.

Freshly printed copies of the San Francisco Chronicle run through the printing press at one of the Chronicle's printing facilities in San Francisco on Sept. 20, 2007. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

You Can Hack This Headline for $200

Cybercriminals claim to be selling the ability to manipulate media outlets’ articles.

A cleaner in front of a store selling Huawei products in Beijing on Jan. 29. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Who Benefits From the U.S. Crackdown on Huawei?

Rival companies could get a boost—or face a backlash from China.

A billboard advertising Apple's iPhone security is displayed during the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Jan. 7. (David Becker/Getty Images)

Surveillance Is a Tech Problem, but It Requires a Policy Solution

Apple’s former security chief explains why he took a job with the ACLU.

Former journlalist Zhou Yuan—the founder and CEO of Zhihu, a knowledge-sharing platform popular among China’s professional class—speaks during the 5th World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, in Zhejiang province, China, on Nov. 8, 2018.

Once Muckrakers, Now Capitalists

How Chinese journalists traded censorship for the tech boom.

An AFP collaborator uses the Chinese app TikTok on Dec. 14, 2018 in Paris. (-/AFP/Getty Images)

ByteDance Can’t Outrun Beijing’s Shadow

The Chinese social media firm is the most valued start-up in the world—but it’s going to hit political walls.

Chinese police patrol in front of the Canadian embassy in Beijing on December 14, 2018. (GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

China Is Shooting Itself in the Foot Over Huawei

Beijing's hostage diplomacy is confirming the West's suspicions.

Nisei Boy Scouts of Troop 41 in Pasadena, California, check maps using compasses as part of a mapmaking project in 1958. (University of Southern California Libraries/Corbis via Getty Images)

Humans Are the Best Security Backup

When the grid goes down, old-fashioned skills save lives.

More than 100,000 shared bikes are piled up in an open space in Xiamen, China, on Jan. 13. (Wang Dongming/China News Service/VCG via Getty Images)

The Rise and Fall of China’s Cycling Empires

China’s bike-sharing firms were supposed to be the next big thing. What happened?

(Etienne Oliveau/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Beijing’s Big, Bad Year

Five Reads: The best Foreign Policy stories of 2018 on China.

(Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy)

The Internet Will Doom Us All

Five Reads: The best Foreign Policy stories of 2018 on tech.

An equation written at a secondary school on Dec. 1, 2014 in London. (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

The Welfare State Is Committing Suicide by Artificial Intelligence

Denmark is using algorithms to deliver benefits to citizens—and undermining its own democracy in the process.

Angirekula Sreekanth poses for a photograph with a copy of his U.S. visa and those of his relatives at the Chilkur Balaji Temple in Rangareddy district, near Hyderabad, on April 29, 2017.

A New U.S. Immigration Law Would Hurt Iranians the Most

H.R. 392 will help skilled immigrants from India jump the green-card queue—at the expense of everyone else.

Russian President Vladimir Putin (C), Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu (R) and Commander in Chief of the Russian Navy Vladimir Korolev (L) watch a terrestrial globe while visiting Russia's Navy Headquarters during Navy Day in Saint Petersburg on July 30, 2017. (ALEXEY NIKOLSKY/AFP/Getty Images)

The GPS Wars Are Here

Location-based services are universal, critical, and horribly vulnerable.

A prosthetic hand from BrainRobotics, which draws on machine learning, at the 2017 Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada on Jan. 7, 2017.  
(Sophie Estienne/AFP/Getty Images)

Congress Can Help the United States Lead in Artificial Intelligence

The United States is falling behind when it comes to AI. Here’s how a new congressional commission can ensure that Washington catches up.

The logo of Chinese electronics company Huawei on Sept. 2, 2015 in Berlin. (John Macdougal/AFP/Getty Images)

Germany Is Soft on Chinese Spying

Huawei has deep ties to the Chinese government. Berlin might let it build the country’s next generation of communications infrastructure anyway.

Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter chief executive officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing  on Capitol Hill, September 5, 2018 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The Internet Is Going To End Up Like Greece

When the big players get away with open fraud, trust disintegrates.

A road sign points towards an Airbnb apartment, located in the Esh Kodesh outpost, near the Jewish settlement of Shilo and the Palestinian village of Qusra in the West Bank on November 20, 2018.

If the U.S. Government Won’t Act, Airbnb Will

While the White House rubber-stamps Benjamin Netanyahu’s every move, the online rental company is cracking down on Israel’s illegal settlements.

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