technology

A prosthetic hand from BrainRobotics, which draws on machine learning, at the 2017 Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada on Jan. 7, 2017.  
(Sophie Estienne/AFP/Getty Images)

Congress Can Help the United States Lead in Artificial Intelligence

The United States is falling behind when it comes to AI. Here’s how a new congressional commission can ensure that Washington catches up.

The logo of Chinese electronics company Huawei on Sept. 2, 2015 in Berlin. (John Macdougal/AFP/Getty Images)

Germany Is Soft on Chinese Spying

Huawei has deep ties to the Chinese government. Berlin might let it build the country’s next generation of communications infrastructure anyway.

Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter chief executive officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing  on Capitol Hill, September 5, 2018 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The Internet Is Going To End Up Like Greece

When the big players get away with open fraud, trust disintegrates.

A road sign points towards an Airbnb apartment, located in the Esh Kodesh outpost, near the Jewish settlement of Shilo and the Palestinian village of Qusra in the West Bank on November 20, 2018.

If the U.S. Government Won’t Act, Airbnb Will

While the White House rubber-stamps Benjamin Netanyahu’s every move, the online rental company is cracking down on Israel’s illegal settlements.

AI (Artificial Inteligence) security cameras using facial recognition technology are displayed at the 14th China International Exhibition on Public Safety and Security at the China International Exhibition Center in Beijing on October 24, 2018. (NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)

China’s Orwellian Social Credit Score Isn’t Real

Blacklists and monitoring systems are nowhere close to Black Mirror fantasies.

A member of the Metropolitan Police SWAT team patrols a movie theater before a showing of the film "The Interview" on December 25, 2014 in Washington, DC.

In Cyberwar, There Are Some (Unspoken) Rules

A recent article argues that the lack of legal norms invites cyberconflict. But governments know the price of overreach and are refraining from unleashing their full capabilities.

Indians take pictures of a Durga idol inside a makeshift "pandal" structure in Kolkata on Oct. 16. (DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Sleeping Tech Giants Are About to Awaken

A weak rupee could be just the push the Big Five need.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence addresses the Hudson Institute in Washington on the administration's policy toward China on Oct. 4. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia Is 4chan, China Is Facebook

Mike Pence’s equation of Beijing’s influence with Moscow’s hacking was misleading and dangerous

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

The Algorithms of August

The AI arms race won’t be like previous competitions, and both the United States and China could be left in the dust.

Andrew Marshall. (Lexey Swall for Foreign Policy)

The Return of the Pentagon’s Yoda

Can Andrew Marshall, the U.S. military’s longtime oracle, still predict the future?

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In Cyberwar, There are No Rules

Why the world desperately needs digital Geneva Conventions.

Alipay and WeChat QR codes for online payment are displayed at a meat stall at a market in Nantong in China's eastern Jiangsu province. Sept. 10.(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

China Can’t Afford a Cashless Society

A mania for mobile payments is leaving the poor behind.

A Chinese flag flies over the company logo outside the Google China headquarters in Beijing on January 14, 2010. (LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Google Is Handing the Future of the Internet to China

The company has been quietly collaborating with the Chinese government on a new, censored search engine—and abandoning its own ideals in the process.

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The Rise of the Cyber-Mercenaries

What happens when private firms have cyberweapons as powerful as those owned by governments?

(iStockphoto/Foreign Policy illustration)

The Data Arms Race Is No Excuse for Abandoning Privacy

Tech competition is being used to push a dangerous corporate agenda.

(iStockphoto/Foreign Policy illustration)

Ecuador’s All-Seeing Eye Is Made in China

The country's pioneering surveillance and response system is entirely Chinese-built and funded.

Giant letters, reading the word "blockchain" are displayed at the blockchain centre, which aims at boosting start-ups, on February 7, 2018 in Lithuania's capital Vilnius.
(PETRAS MALUKAS/AFP/Getty Images)

America Needs a Blockchain Strategy ASAP

The technology behind cryptocurrency can keep the United States safe—but only if the country takes advantage of its head start.

(Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images/iStockphoto/Foreign Policy illustration)

China’s AI Giants Can’t Say No to the Party

Open debate about the ethics of tech is a strength, not a weakness, of the U.S. system.

A Google self-driving car is displayed at the Google headquarters on September 25, 2012 in Mountain View, California.  (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Self-Driving Cars Are on the Road to Nowhere

Technology companies have been selling a vision of greener cities and safer roads. It's nothing more than hype.

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