Terrorism

Iraqi men flash the victory gesture from inside a car during the Hashed Shaabi (Popular Mobilisation) paramilitary forces' celebrations marking the first anniversary of victory over the Islamic State (IS) group on December 10, 2018. (Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images)

Start Small to Stop the Next ISIS

One year on from the defeat of the Islamic State, the new U.S. Congress should draw on lessons learned from efforts to counter violent extremism.

Indian villagers run following shelling across the India-Pakistan border in Jhora village  on January 20, 2018.
( -/AFP/Getty Images)

How the India-Pakistan Conflict Leaves Great Powers Powerless

The U.S. helped prevent war in 2008. Those days are gone.

Afghan security forces and investigators gather at the site of a suicide bomb attack outside a British security firm's compound in Kabul, a day after the blast on November 29, 2018.  (NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP/Getty Images)

Afghanistan’s Taliban Is in It to Win It

The United States should remember Islamist militants are playing the long game.

Mumbai police pay respects at the Police Memorial during an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the 2008 Mumbai militant attacks in Mumbai on November 26, 2018. ( INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images)

India and Pakistan Aren’t Ready for Another Terrorist Crisis

Neither state has fixed the problems behind the Mumbai attacks a decade ago.

Demonstrators gather outside a deradicalization center in Pontourny, France, the country's first Center for Prevention, Integration, and Citizenship on February 11, 2017 during a protest demanding its closure.

Want to Deradicalize Terrorists? Treat Them Like Everyone Else.

Many counter-extremism efforts falter because ideological reform programs run by governments lack credibility. Appealing to the basic psychological needs of ex-radicals is more promising.

Afghan Taliban militants stand with residents as they took to the street to celebrate ceasefire on the second day of Eid in the outskirts of Jalalabad on June 16,2018. - Taliban fighters and Afghan security forces hugged and took selfies with each other in restive eastern Afghanistan on June 16, as an unprecedented ceasefire in the war-torn country held for the second day of Eid. (NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP/Getty Images)

Shutting Out Iran Will Make the Afghan War Even Deadlier

Washington's hard line gives Tehran every reason to fund the Taliban.

Sudanese Foreign Minister Al-Dirdiri Mohamed Ahmed gives a press conference in Khartoum on June 24. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Administration Gives Sudan a Way to Come in From the Cold

The United States should stop listing Sudan as a state sponsor of terrorism, Sudanese foreign minister tells FP, as Khartoum seeks to boost its crumbling economy.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump prior to the president's departure from Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv on May 23, 2017.

Trump First, Jews Later

Israeli government officials are helping to normalize the violent anti-Semitism of the Christian right.

U.S. President Donald Trump waves to reporters as he and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (R) leave the weekly Senate Republican Policy Committee luncheon in the U.S. Capitol on Nov. 28, 2017.

When Fighting Domestic Terrorism, You Get What You Pay For

The Trump administration has gutted the budget for fighting far-right extremists, making it harder to stop attacks like the Pittsburgh massacre.

An estimated 4,000 people gather to march for solidarity during President Donald Trump's visit to Pittsburgh in the wake of a mass shooting at a synagogue on Oct. 30. (Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

Trump’s Divisive Speech Puts the First Amendment at Risk

Americans’ commitment to unfettered free speech is starting to fray. If Trump can’t control his words, those around him have a responsibility to keep hate speech in check.

Lorea Stallard and her husband, Kyle Parker, stand in front of flowers and candles placed outside the Tree of Life synagogue after a shooting there left 11 dead in Pittsburgh on Oct. 27. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

‘Hateful Speech Almost Always Leads to Hateful Action’

The head of the refugee resettlement group that transfixed the Pittsburgh shooter says xenophobia is rising globally.

A man lights a candle outside of the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh on Oct. 27. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

When to Call a Terrorist a Terrorist

The attack in Pittsburgh was an act of domestic terrorism. We should call it that.

U.S. President Donald Trump hosts a cabinet meeting in the White House on Aug. 16. (Oliver Contreras/Pool/Getty Images)

Has Trump Read His Own Counterterrorism Strategy?

The president’s views don’t seem to line up with those of his team.

A picture shows a mural depicting the emblem of the Islamic State in Hawija, Iraq, on Oct. 5, 2017. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS’s New Plans to Get Rich and Wreak Havoc

The terrorist organization has lost almost all its territory but has found new ways to make vast sums of money.

Tourists and Tunisians take part in a ceremony on July 3, 2015, in memory of those killed the previous week by a jihadist gunman in front of the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis. (Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

The Fight Against Terror Needs Better Data

The case of Tunisia shows that the anger of disappointed middle-class youths is driving radicalization more than poverty or unemployment.

Iranian women mourn during a public funeral in Ahvaz on Sept. 24. The ceremony was for those killed during an attack on a military parade over the weekend. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Did a Terrorist Attack Just Save the Iranian Regime?

After a strike on a military parade, nationalist sentiment is on the rise—and not a moment too soon for a government that was facing deepening discontent.

Rescuers work among the rubble after the bombing U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya on Aug. 7, 1998. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Bombings the World Forgot 

On the podcast: Ambassador Prudence Bushnell survived the 1998 bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Kenya. Now she tells her story.

Community police patrol the hills in Carrizalillo, Guerrero state, one of Mexico’s most dangerous, crime-ridden regions, on March 24. (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

The Coming Crime Wars

Future conflicts will mostly be waged by drug cartels, mafia groups, gangs, and terrorists. It is time to rethink our rules of engagement.

(JM Lopez/AFP/Getty Images/iStockphoto/Foreign Policy illustration)

Time for Peace Talks With ISIS and Al Qaeda?

With options limited for fighting terrorists, negotiations may be the best remaining alternative.

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