Terrorism

U.S. Marine Corps Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, the head of U.S. Central Command, speaks as a picture of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is seen during a press briefing at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on Oct. 30.

The Islamic State Will Outlive Baghdadi. Afghanistan Shows How.

The Islamic State-Khorasan offers a powerful case study of the militant group’s ability to create autonomous affiliates that flourish and endure.

Indian Shiite Muslim demonstrators burn an image of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi during a protest in New Delhi on June 9, 2017.

Baghdadi Is Dead But His Legend Lives On

The leader of the Islamic State was finally killed—but not before he became the most important terrorist in recent history.

A member of the Syrian pro-government forces carries an Islamic State flag as he stands on a street in Palmyra on March 27, 2016.

Baghdadi’s Martyrdom Bump

Killing the Islamic State leader will not kill his ideas.

A member of the Iraqi forces walks past a mural bearing the logo of the Islamic State south of Mosul on March 1, 2017.

Baghdadi’s Death Will Make Global Affiliates More Independent

The Islamic State’s next leader will have a hard time bringing disparate groups with competing agendas together.

A woman and children near a water tank at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State foreign fighters are held in northeastern Syria on Oct. 17.

In Syria, the Women and Children of ISIS Have Been Forgotten

Leaving thousands of detained Islamic State supporters and their families in poorly guarded camps poses a national security threat for Europe and the United States.

Members of the Iraqi Army load suspected Islamic State jihadis into a truck as they leave the courts before going to jail south of Mosul on Dec. 6, 2016.

Iraq Confronts Its Own Prisoner’s Dilemma

New survey data shows that Iraqis are deeply divided on how to punish members of the terrorist group.

Staff at the Prince of Wales hospital in Hong Kong wear face masks to protect themselves from SARS on March 14, 2003.

What Terrorism Experts Can Learn From Public Health Experts

National security professionals have a duty to use their influence to fight hyperbole.

About 20 members and supporters of Confederate heritage groups, including CSA II: The New Confederate States of America and the Virginia Task Force of Three Percenters or the 'Dixie Defenders,' face off with about 100 counter protesters at the Jefferson Davis Monument August 19, 2018 in Richmond, Virginia.

White Supremacy Has Triggered a Terrorism Panic

The collective response to white nationalism has swung wildly from complacency to terrified myth-making.

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Did the U.S. Even Have the Authority to Bar Iranian Leaders From U.N. Summit?

The United Nations has long disputed that Washington has a right to block people from the New York headquarters—going back to Yasser Arafat in 1988.

A man suspected of belonging to the Islamic State group, who spoke to journalists in French, leans on the back of a truck as he waits to be searched by members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces just after leaving the Islamic State's last holdout of Baghouz, in the eastern Syrian province of Deir Ezzor on March 4.

They Left to Join ISIS. Now Europe Is Leaving Their Citizens to Die in Iraq.

A Belgian fighter captured in Syria was transported to Iraq to face trial. He's now on death row.

Razor wire tops the U.S.-Mexico border fence near Tijuana, Mexico, on Nov. 16, 2018.

Keeping Refugees Out Makes the United States Less Safe

Instead, Washington should focus on helping end conflicts around the world.

The annual Tribute in Light memorial echoing the twin towers of the World Trade Center illuminates the night sky during the tenth Anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on Sept. 11, 2011, in this view from Bayonne, New Jersey.

It’s Hard to Commemorate 9/11 If You Don’t Understand It.

Today’s university freshmen were born after the Twin Towers fell. In the Trump era, lack of historical perspective makes young people susceptible to alarmism and more likely to misread threats.

Islamic fighters from the al-Qaida group in the Levant, Al-Nusra Front, wave their movement's flag as they parade at the Yarmuk Palestinian refugee camp, south of Damascus, to denounce Israels military offensive on the Gaza Strip, on July 28, 2014.

Al Qaeda Is Ready to Attack You Again

Eighteen years after 9/11, the terrorist group has found a new home—and rediscovered its old mission.

The Taliban’s Broken Pledge to Contain Terrorists

A generation ago, the Taliban promised to prevent Osama bin Laden from targeting Americans—then came 9/11.

A soldier atop an armored personal vehicle smiles as Soviet troops stop in Kabul prior to their withdrawal from Afghanistan on May 16, 1988.

In Afghanistan and Kashmir, It’s the 1980s All Over Again

Decades of violence and terrorism were set in motion back then. Here’s how to avoid that from happening this time around.

Neo-Nazi protestors organized by the National Socialist Movement demonstrate near where the grand opening ceremonies were held for the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center April 19, 2009 in Skokie, Illinois.

White Supremacists Want a Dirty Bomb

And the Trump administration is letting them get dangerously close to acquiring one.

U.S. soldiers arrive at Saudi Arabia's Dhahran air base in 1991.

Did Mohammed bin Salman Just Give Jihadis the World’s Greatest Terrorist Recruiting Tool?

Anger at the presence of U.S. troops on sacred Saudi soil led Osama bin Laden to found al Qaeda and wage jihad on the West. The crown prince’s decision to welcome them back could light the fuse again.

A U.S. Department of Homeland Security police officer in front of an American flag in Portland, Oregon, on June 4, 2017.

The United States Can’t Put Terrorism Behind It

The 9/11 Commission Report is 15 years old—and the issues it raises are more relevant than ever.

A woman places flowers beside a makeshift memorial outside the Cielo Vista Mall Wal-Mart where a shooting left 20 people dead in El Paso, Texas, on August 4, 2019.

How Does Online Racism Spawn Mass Shooters?

White nationalist terrorism is becoming normalized through internet forums.