Trade

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (R) listens while Japan's Foreign Minister Taro Kono speaks during a press conference after 2+2 meeting at the US Department of State April 19, 2019, in Washington, DC.

Japan Pushes the Speed Limit on Trade Talks

Tokyo wants to swerve past Trumpian pitfalls—and get a deal done.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

A loaded cargo ship sits in the Yangshan Deep-Water Port in China on Dec. 6, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Dangers of Trade Orthodoxy

By shoving the very idea of trade tensions under the table, models undermine coherent discussion of how to handle them.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He talk to reporters at the White House on April 4. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A Win-Win U.S.-China Trade Deal Is Possible

Selling more goods is not enough. Trump’s trade agreement with Beijing must include real structural reforms.

Shinzo Abe speaks at his party's headquarters in Oct. 2017 (Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

How Japan Became the Adult at the Trade Table

While Washington withdraws from multilateral deals, Tokyo has been uncharacteristically leading efforts to save them.

U.S. President Donald Trump discusses trade policy with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at the White House on April 4. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

In Trump’s Economy, the Invisible Hand Belongs to the Government

The state’s role in the U.S. economy has expanded dramatically under President Trump, even as he pushes China to exert less control.

Anti-Brexit activists demonstrate with a model of Theresa May outside the Houses of Parliament in London on April 1, 2019, as MPs debate alternative alternative options for Brexit

Britain’s Crisis Isn’t Constitutional. It’s Political.

A Remain Parliament is confronting a Brexit electorate—and none of the solutions on offer is likely to resolve the stalemate anytime soon.

A pro-Brexit activist holds a placard outside the Houses of Parliament in central London on March 20.

Why Europe Should Reject Theresa May’s Brexit Extension

If Britain remains in the European Union due to a botched Brexit, its demands for special treatment will end up wrecking the EU.

Three Boeing 737 Max 8 planes from Shanghai Airlines parked at Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport on March 11, 2019.

Boeing’s Crisis Strengthens Beijing’s Hand

In its trade standoff with the United States, China’s Ace could be the 737 Max.

Local fishermen’s boats moor at Berbera port, in the breakaway territory of Somaliland, on July 21, 2018. (Mustafa Saeed/AFP/Getty Images)

For Somaliland and Djibouti, Will New Friends Bring Benefits?

Interest in the Horn of Africa from foreign powers has always been a double-edged sword.

Anti-Brexit protesters demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament on March 13, ahead of a week of crucial votes on the future of Britain’s relationship with Europe. (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

Britain Looks Into the Trade Abyss

Many fear a go-it-alone future outside the EU portends economic eclipse.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi deliver joint statements in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 26, 2017. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

India is Trump’s Next Target in the Trade War

Ending India’s preferential trade treatment won’t hurt economically—but it is politically dangerous.

A banner showing U.S President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un shaking hands next to the words "Welcome to Vietnam" in Hanoi on Feb. 25. (Carl Court/Getty Images)

Despite Setbacks, Trump’s Blunt Diplomacy Could Eventually Work

He's had one of the worst weeks as president. But his crude blend of threats and flattery could eventually pay off with North Korea and China.

U.S. President Donald Trump discusses the pending U.S.-China trade deal with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer in the White House on Feb. 22. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Having Failed to Clinch a Deal With North Korea, Trump Turns to China

The administration talks up progress in “historic” trade talks, but an agreement remains elusive.

The flags of the United Kingdom, Gibraltar, and the European Union are flown with the Rock of Gibraltar in the background at the Spain-Gibraltar border on April 4, 2017. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Gibraltar Will Never Accept Shared Sovereignty

The Spanish government seems to think the British overseas territory will sacrifice its sovereignty for the sake of convenience after Brexit. It is wrong.

Kolbars carrying smuggled goods return from Iraq down the Kuh-e Takht mountain in Iran on Dec. 12, 2018. (Sergio Colombo and Andrea Prada Bianchi for Foreign Policy)

For Kurdish Smugglers, Iran Sanctions Are Starting to Bite

The kolbars brave subfreezing temperatures and border guards’ bullets to carry heavy loads over the mountains in an unemployment-plagued region that Iran’s government has all but forgotten.

A worker drives a finished Mercedes-Benz C-Class car through production in Bremen, Germany, on Jan. 24, 2017. (Alexander Koerner/Getty Images)

Build the Wall—To Keep Out the BMWs and Benzes

Trump’s threatened trade war against European cars would hurt America most.

Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration

Trump’s Trade Woes Cloud His Re-Election Chances

The new NAFTA is going nowhere, China’s not budging, and farmers are going under.

From left, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, U.K. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas launch the long-awaited special vehicle for Iran trade in Bucharest, Romania, on Jan. 31. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images)

EU Offers Up a Meager Workaround to U.S. Iran Sanctions

The new vehicle will do little to ease Iran’s economic pain, though it should help humanitarian trade.

Syrian refugees, stuck between the Jordanian and Syrian borders, wait to cross into Jordan at the Hadalat border crossing on Jan. 14, 2016. (Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

Investing in Low-Wage Jobs Is the Wrong Way to Reduce Migration

Unless would-be migrants can build lives with dignity—which poorly paid, export-oriented jobs do not provide—they will continue to seek ways to move on.

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