Trump

Signs depicting U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi on Feb. 20. (Linh Pham/Getty Images)

At the Hanoi Summit, Trump Should Hold Himself to His Own Standards

A freeze-for-freeze deal is exactly what the administration once swore it would not accept.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, gestures as he meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the start of their historic summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

North Korea Sells Weapons Worldwide While Trump Pushes for Peace

The U.S. president trashed the Iran nuclear deal because of Tehran’s bad behavior. But Pyongyang is little better, says a confidential U.N. report.

A public signboard near the U.S. Embassy on Feb. 21 in Hanoi, Vietnam. (Linh Pham/Getty Images)

Trump and Kim Gotta Have Faith

There's no reason for the United States and North Korea to trust each other. But they have to try anyway.

A worker drives a finished Mercedes-Benz C-Class car through production in Bremen, Germany, on Jan. 24, 2017. (Alexander Koerner/Getty Images)

Build the Wall—To Keep Out the BMWs and Benzes

Trump’s threatened trade war against European cars would hurt America most.

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó gather at a rally in Caracas on Feb. 16. (Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s How Trump Can Hasten Maduro’s Exit

Thoughtful U.S. policies could help restore Venezuela’s democracy.

A signboard welcomes the upcoming summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a restaurant in Tu Liem District in Hanoi on Feb. 20. (Linh Pham/Getty Images)

Hanoi Is Happy Cozying Up to Trump

At the U.S.-North Korea summit, the host may be the biggest winner.

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to visit with families of fallen soldiers as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, center, and acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, right, follow at Dover Air Force base in Delaware on Jan. 19. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Does Anyone Want to Be Secretary of Defense?

White House struggles to fill the top Pentagon job.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer answer questions following an announced end to the partial government shutdown at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 25. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Start the North Korea Hearings. And the Saudi Arabia Hearings. And the China Hearings…

How can Congress avoid getting sidelined on foreign policy? There’s only one right answer.

Engineers from the 937th Clearance Company prepare to place concertina wire on the Arizona-Mexico border wall on Dec. 1, 2018. (U.S. Army photo by 2nd Lt. Corey Maisch)

Trump Declares National Emergency in ‘Slap in the Face to Military Families’

The president will divert billions that would have gone to military construction projects.

Chef José Andrés stirs paella in a giant pan during the #ChefsForPuertoRico relief operation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October 2017. (World Central Kitchen)

Paellas for the People

On the podcast: How chef José Andrés feeds the needy around the world.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walks with U.S. President Donald Trump during a break in talks at their summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

North Korea Needs a Real Deal, Not a Trump Special

The Hanoi summit can be a step forward—if both sides commit.

U.S. President Donald Trump signs an executive order to start the Mexico border wall project at the Department of Homeland Security facility in Washington, D.C., on January 25, 2017. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

With Emergency Declaration, Trump Sticks by His Populist Persona

Trump will continue targeting immigrants, while the Democrats will target the rich. Success in 2020 will depend on the messaging.

A view of the border wall between Mexico and the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state, Mexico on Jan. 19, 2018.
(Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump May Have $21 Billion in Military Funds Available for the Wall

The president plans to sign a federal spending bill and declare a national emergency to bankroll his long-promised border wall.

U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping leave an event in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Foreign Policy Is a Work in Progress

His successes and failures defy simplistic, partisan assessment.

French president Emmanuel Macron (L) and his Egyptian counterpart Abdel Fattah al-Sisi (R) take part in an official diner at the Al Massah hotel, in Cairo, on Jan. 28, 2019.

Western Leaders Are Promoting Dictatorship, Not Democracy, in Egypt

Emmanuel Macron’s visit to Cairo and Donald Trump’s cheerleading have bolstered Abdel Fattah al-Sisi as he faces popular protest over his latest power grab.

U.S. President Donald Trump and then-Defense Secretary James Mattis attend a cabinet meeting in the White House on March 8, 2018. (Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)

Mattis Was the Best Secretary of Defense Trump Could Have Had

In grading him, we must adjust for the difficulty of the assignment.

U.S. President Donald Trump congratulates his son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner after the swearing-in of senior staff at the White House on Jan. 22, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Jared Kushner and the Art of Humiliation

Trump’s son-in-law has become known as a deal-maker. But with the Palestinians, his approach appears to be take it or leave it.

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, and former President Barack Obama at the Washington National Cathedral on Dec. 5, 2018. (Alex Brandon/Getty Images)

Trump Is America’s First Contradiction-in-Chief

The United States has never had a military leader as bold, naive, and arrogant as the current president.

Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as La Bestia in Las Patronas, Veracruz state, Mexico, to travel through Mexico to reach the United States on Aug. 9, 2018. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Isn’t Helping Refugees. It’s Depriving Them of Their Rights.

The humanitarian visas offered to migrants don’t allow them to work, study, or receive benefits while letting the Mexican government duck its responsibilities under international law.

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