Turkey

Cumhuriyet editor in chief Can Dundar speaks to media as he arrives at a courthouse for trial in Istanbul on April 1, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

‘To Be a Journalist in Turkey Means You’re Ready to Sacrifice Everything’

On the podcast: the price one Turkish newspaper editor is paying for angering President Erdogan.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani shrugs during a press conference with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Tehran on Sept. 7. (Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)

Trump Waives Iran Sanctions for Turkey

How Erdogan could use the exception to outsmart the United States, again.

A man shows off a gold stone at a gold mine in El Callao, Venezuela, on Feb. 25, 2017. (Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Fool’s Gold in Venezuela

New sanctions on exports of the natural resource will punish Ankara more than Caracas.

A Syrian rebel fighter with the National Liberation Front watches towards the regime areas in northwestern Aleppo province on October 9, 2018. (Aaref Watad/AFP/Getty Images)

The New U.N. Envoy to Syria Should Kill the Political Process to Save It

A tougher stance from the United Nations would put pressure on Assad and Putin while improving the lives of ordinary Syrians.

U.S. forces, accompanied by the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), drive armored vehicles near the northern Syrian village of Darbasiyah on April 28, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S.-Turkish Ties May Be Cut for Good in Syria

The two countries are trying to work together in Manbij, and it isn’t going well.

A protester dressed as Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman and another dressed as U.S. President Donald Trump stand outside the White House in the wake of the disappearance of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi on Oct. 19. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

How to Get Away With Murder (Saudi Edition)

A primer on Riyadh’s denials, excuses, rationalizations, spin, and other acts of sophistry about the death of Jamal Khashoggi.

Manal al-Sharif reads from her book, Daring to Drive: A Saudi Woman's Awakening, in Munich on Oct. 8, 2017. (Andreas Gebert/picture alliance via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

‘They Took Them Quietly. All of Them Are in Jail Today.’

On the podcast: A woman who challenged the Saudi regime by getting behind the wheel of a car speaks out.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Saudi King Salman during the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Summit at the Istanbul Congress Center on April 14, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Khashoggi’s Death Is Highlighting the Ottoman-Saudi Islamic Rift

The journalist’s suspected murder, and its aftermath, was the latest battle of a 300-year war over Sunni Islam.

The Rev. Andrew Brunson, escorted by Turkish plainclothes police officers, arrives at his house in Izmir on July 25. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan May Have Freed Pastor Brunson, But Turkey’s Economy Is Still Trapped

Even if Trump lifts sanctions now, the lira won’t recover for a long time.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman participates in a meeting between members of the British government and Saudi ministers and delegates in London on March 7. (Dan Kitwood/WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Will the Saudis’ Khashoggi Confession Get Them Off the Hook?

By claiming they were only trying to abduct the journalist, they’re hoping to draw a moral equivalence with U.S. renditions.

U.S. pastor Andrew Brunson arrives at Adnan Menderes Airport ahead of his departure from Turkey in Izmir on Oct. 12. (Omer Sut/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Erdogan Frees U.S. Pastor While Still Managing to Embarrass Trump

Turkey’s leaks in the Khashoggi case have put the U.S. president in a tight spot.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press briefing at the State Department in Washington on Oct. 3 (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Washington Blame Game Ensues as Ambassador Posts Sit Empty

The disappearance of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi spotlights a staffing problem.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Saudi Arabia-United States Partnership Meeting in Washington on March 23. (Bandar Algaloud/Saudi Kingdom Council/Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

The U.S.-Saudi Relationship: Too Faustian to Fail?

Trump’s in too deep with Mohammed bin Salman to make a stink about Jamal Khashoggi.

A police officer enters the Consulate General of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul, Turkey, as the search continues for Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who has been missing since he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. (Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is Even Stranger Than It Seems

The Saudi journalist is presumed dead, but we may never know what happened to him.

Posters advocating for Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi hang on a police barricade in front of  Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 8. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is a Slap in the Face to the United States

Washington should explore retaliatory measures that impose real costs on Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks at the U.N. General Assembly in New York City on Sept. 25. (John Moore/Getty Images)

How to Fix the U.N.—and Why We Should

Don’t let major powers such as the United States undermine the liberal international order. Instead, reform it so it works better.

Syrian rebel fighters in the northern countryside of Idlib province on Sept. 11. (Aaref Warad/AFP/Getty Images)

Turkey and the United States Should Work Together to Avert Disaster in Idlib

Despite their differences, Trump and Erodgan share an interest in avoiding a new humanitarian catastrophe in Syria.

U.S. President Donald Trump reaches to shake Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's hand before a meeting at the Palace Hotel during the 72nd U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, 2017 in New York City. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S.-Turkey Relationship Is Worse Off Than You Think

The alliance between Washington and Ankara needs to be saved—and easy fixes won't cut it.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, Turkey, on July 9. (Stringer/Getty Images)

Wrong Place, Wrong Time

On the podcast: An American who was in Turkey during the coup attempt is accused of being one of the plotters.

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