Turkey

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi are greeted by South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa

Coronavirus Has Started a Censorship Pandemic

Governments around the world are banning fake news about the crisis—and cracking down on their critics while they’re at it.

People inspect the damage inside a building following a rocket attack by forces loyal to eastern Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar.

The Libyan Civil War Is About to Get Worse

None of the parties involved is serious about reaching a political settlement, meaning the conflict could kill many more this year.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan

Sisi and Erdogan Are Accomplices of the Coronavirus

By killing the Middle East’s sense of community, the region’s dictators have helped the pandemic on its death march.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump

Syria Is Turkey’s Problem, Not America’s

The war in Idlib is a growing humanitarian crisis, a potential disaster for Ankara—and a problem that doesn’t bear on Washington.

Riot police clashes with migrants outside of a refugee camp in Diavata, a west suburb of Thessaloniki on April 4, 2019.

Europe’s Morality Is Dying at the Greek Border

The EU refused to prepare for a predictable rekindling of the migration crisis—and is now responding with deadly force.

Syrians displaced by the war gather in Idlib

Turkey Is Forcing the West to Look at Idlib

Ankara’s cynical border move gives the European Union the opportunity to redress its past mistakes in Syria.

Migrants walk toward the Greek border in Pazarkule, in Turkey's Edirne district, on March 1, near where thousands of migrants stuck on the border clashed with Greek police on Feb. 29.

Erdogan’s Empty Threats

Turkey’s decision to allow migrants to cross into the European Union was intended to pressure EU leaders to come to Ankara’s aid against Bashar al-Assad. It isn’t working.

Displaced Syrian children stand by the Turkish border wall at an informal camp in Kafr Lusin village in Syria's northwestern province of Idlib on Feb. 21.

The U.N. Won’t Save Idlib. The EU and NATO Can.

It’s too late to defeat the Assad regime, but a humanitarian intervention by the EU and NATO could prevent countless deaths and another massive refugee crisis.

An aerial view taken on Feb. 6, 2020, shows smoke billowing from tires burnt by Syrians in an attempt to hinder air strikes.

Turkey’s Intervention in Syria Will Slow Assad, But It Won’t Stop Him

Ankara's latest move might slow the Syrian regime's Russian-backed onslaught on Idlib, but the tyrant will remain on the throne so long as the world turns a blind eye.

Kyriakos Mitsotakis

Greece Accidentally Steered Into a Foreign-Policy Crisis

Turkey is redrawing its borders in the Aegean—and the Greek government is failing to do much about it.

Afghan men walk along the highway between the Turkish cities of Dogubayazit and Agri, in eastern Turkey, near the border with Iran on April 22, 2019. After crossing the border, they were unable to obtain proper documentation that would allow them to ride public transportation, forcing them to walk for hours or days as they travel toward Istanbul on their way to Europe.

As America Shuts Its Doors, Afghan Refugees Are Stuck in Turkey

The Trump administration has made it nearly impossible for Afghans who aided U.S. troops to claim asylum in the United States. Instead, thousands who aided Americans on the battlefield are stranded in a country that doesn't want them.

A ship spewing heavy smoke is pictured on the Bosphorus in Istanbul on April 21, 2009.

In Turkey, a Battle Over Infrastructure Could Shape the Next Presidential Race

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s drive to build a new canal to bypass the Bosphorus faces a formidable opponent: Istanbul mayor and likely presidential contender Ekrem Imamoglu.

Pro-nationalist university students shout during a protest against the U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen and his followers during a demonstration in Ankara on July 21, 2016.

Erdogan’s Purges Have Replaced One Islamic Sect With Another

Turkey expelled alleged sympathizers of Fethullah Gulen from government jobs after the 2016 coup attempt. Other Islamic sects, and one in particular—the Menzil—are now filling the vacuum.

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