U.S. Foreign Policy

A statue of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his dog Fala are seen at the FDR Memorial September 20, 2012 in Washington, DC.

There Once Was a President Who Hated War

American elites used to see war as a tragic necessity. Now they’re completely addicted to it.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan prepares to speak at the Brookings Institution, March 31, 2016 in Washington, DC.

Erdogan Plays Washington Like a Fiddle

As U.S. policymakers worry about their special relationship with Ankara, Turkey’s president knows it's already dead.

Former U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson makes a statement after his dismissal at the State Department in Washington, D.C.,  on March 13, 2018.

Hiring Freeze Put U.S. Diplomats Under Threat Worldwide, Report Says

Many programs in counterterrorism, global health, and cybersecurity are also struggling.

Supporters of Cameroonian President Paul Biya's party, the Cameroon People's Democratic Movement, walk through Bongo Square under the watch of a gendarme in Buea, Cameroon, on Oct. 3, 2018.

African Governments Rush to Hire Trump-Linked Lobbyists 

Accused of atrocities, Cameroon is only the latest to jump in, employing a firm that just brought on Donald Trump’s former acting attorney general.

U.S. President Donald Trump attends a meeting with Russia's President Vladimir Putin during the G20 summit in Osaka on June 28.

The 2 Steps to Fix Relations With Russia

Washington needs to establish deterrence with Moscow. But in the long term, it needs to focus on building trust.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani awards Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif with the Medal of Honour for his role in the implementation of a nuclear deal with world powers, on Feb. 8, 2016, in Tehran.

How to Kick-Start Nuclear Negotiations With Iran (Again)

A single administrative act could put the Trump administration on a path toward a new nuclear deal with Tehran.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands at the G20 Summit in Osaka on June 29.

The World This Weekend

Japan and South Korea continue a historic dispute while Turkey exits the F-35 program amid tensions with the United States.

Saudi Minister of State Mohammed al-Shaikh arrives for the second day of a U.S.-sponsored Middle East economic conference in Bahrain on June 26.

Gulf-Israel Ties Might Not Survive Trump’s Peace Plan

A political program that does not envision statehood for the Palestinians could reverse the Gulf Arab states’ tentative warming toward Israel.

U.S. President Donald Trump signs an executive order on Iran sanctions in the White House on June 24.

Trump’s Iran Policy Hasn’t Failed—Yet

Maximum pressure could still deliver strategic outcomes.

Cameroonian President Paul Biya looks toward supporters from his motorcade in Yaoundé on Nov. 6, 2018.

The U.S. Should Bid Biya Goodbye

It’s time for Washington to renegotiate its ties with Cameroon's absentee leader.

Hungarian-born US investor and philanthropist George Soros receives the Schumpeter Award 2019 in Vienna, Austria on June 21, 2019.

Billionaires Can’t Buy World Peace

A new think tank funded by George Soros and Charles Koch wants to end American interventionism, but shows no understanding of what motivates it.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping before a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 Summit in Osaka, Japan, on June 29.

In Japan and South Korea, Trump Boxed Himself In

The United States is not making progress in its trade war with China or in nuclear talks with North Korea.

Acting U.S. Secretary of Defence Mark Esper in Brussels on June 27.

An Acting Secretary of Defense Isn’t Enough

Amid tensions between Washington and Tehran, the U.S. Department of Defense needs a Senate-confirmed leader.

The stage for the first U.S. Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, on June 26,

Democrats Face a Defense Spending Conundrum

The U.S. foreign-policy establishment shouldn’t balk at pledges to roll back national security commitments.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Dec. 4, 2013.

How Democrats Can Get Tough on China—Without Imitating Trump

The current White House has legitimate concerns but counterproductive solutions.

US Under Secretary of Defence Michelle Flournoy looks on during a meeting with her Chinese counterpart Ma Xiaotian at the Bayi Building in Beijing on Dec. 7, 2011.

Tear Down the Foreign-Policy Glass Ceiling!

Democratic presidential candidates—and a new group of wonks—are committed to fixing rampant gender inequalities in the national security workplace.

Sen. Bernie Sanders attends a press conference on July 24, 2018 in Washington, DC.

A Foreign-Policy Cheat Sheet for the Democratic Debates

We know what the candidates want to talk about. Here's what journalists should be asking.

Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh, the head of the aerospace division of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, speaks to media next to debris from a downed U.S. drone in Tehran on June 21.

The World This Weekend

Trump backs down from Iran strikes, the Pentagon gets a new chief, and Istanbul returns to the polls.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton listens to U.S. President Donald Trump talk to reporters during a cabinet meeting of on February 12.

Trump’s National Security Council Is Replicating Reagan’s Chaos

If John Bolton isn’t careful, he could go the way of William Clark, whose hawkish policies sowed White House discord.

Iranian demonstrators carry a portrait of Iranian Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and an effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump at a rally in Tehran on May 10.

Trump Is Playing Iran’s Game of Drones

Contrary to popular belief, drones aren’t further destabilizing global conflicts—they’re creating a way for leaders to de-escalate crises.

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