Ukraine

Istanbul mayoral candidate Ekrem Imamoglu of the Republican People’s Party (CHP) celebrates his win in the mayoral election rerun on June 23.

Erdogan Gambles and Loses—Again

Plus: New U.S. sanctions on Iran, migration enforcement ramps up in Mexico, and what to watch in the world this week.

Protesters march against the now-suspended China Extradition Law on June 16 in Hong Kong.

China’s Grip on Hong Kong

Plus: The U.N. report on Jamal Khashoggi’s murder, an exodus from Congo, and the other stories we’re following today.

A Sudanese protester outside Khartoum's army headquarters on June 3, 2019.

What’s Next for Sudan?

Plus: Mexico continues talks at the White House, elections in Denmark, and the other stories we're following today.

A child stands on the T-34 Soviet tank set as a monument in the center of Tiraspol, capital of self-proclaimed  Moldovan Republic of Transnistria on April 3, 2017.

Transnistria Isn’t the Smuggler’s Paradise It Used to Be

The separatist territory sandwiched between Moldova and Ukraine has long thrived on porous frontiers and Russian backing, but Kiev has changed its tune and might be dragging it back toward the West.

Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech in Beijing on May 15.

The Big Chill With China?

Plus: Mexico aims for a tariff resolution, protests in the Czech Republic, and the other stories we're following today.

Matteo Salvini, leader of the Italian Lega party, delivers a speech during a nationalist rally on May 18, ahead of EU Parliament elections.

Europe Votes

Plus: Election results expected in India, protests in Indonesia, and the other stories we're following today.

Investors watch market figures in Nanjing, China, at a stock exchange hall on May 20.

Fear of Prolonged U.S.-China Trade War Rattles Markets

Some financial analysts warned that if trade talks between the countries collapse—and tariffs remain high—the global economy could move toward recession.

A Ukrainian flag flies in front of the Ukrainian Central Election Commission in Kiev on March 12.

U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Recalled in ‘Political Hit Job,’ Lawmakers Say

Marie Yovanovitch stepping down as ambassador follows attacks from both right-wing media figures in the United States and a senior Ukrainian official.

A wolf skin is laid out on a pool table in the clubhouse of the Donbass Night Wolves motorcycle club in Luhansk on March 17, 2015. Members of the club have been fighting alongside rebels of the self-proclaimed Luhansk People's Republic.

Going Toe-to-Toe With Ukraine’s Separatist Hackers

The proliferation of cyberespionage tools empower even small breakaway regions to run digital intelligence operations.

Instructions are posted in window of the headquarters of the Norwegian aluminum group Norsk Hydro, following a cyberattack, in Oslo on March 19.

Can Courts Clear the Fog of War?

As online attacks blur the lines, the future may be perpetual conflict.

A police officer guards the area near Dawatagaha Jumma Masjid ahead of Friday prayers in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on April 26.

The World This Weekend

Sri Lanka deals with the aftermath of the Easter Sunday attacks.

A radiation and European bison hazard sign on the road to the deserted village of Ostroglady, Belarus, on April 11. In the exclusion zone, wild nature is flourishing, which means not only radiation but also wild animals—such as wolves and bison—pose a threat to trespassers.

Zombie Movies, Disaster Tourism, and Broken Lives

Thirty-three years after the Chernobyl meltdown, parts of the contaminated zone have become attractions. In others, a harsher reality persists.

Volodymyr Zelensky celebrates after the announcement of the first exit poll results in the second round of Ukraine’s presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Kiev on April 21.

How a Jew Won Over the Land of the Cossacks

Under threat from Russia, national identity in Ukraine has overpowered religious and ethnic differences.

The Ukrainian actor and comedian Volodymyr Zelensky on set in Kiev, Ukraine, during filming of  “Servant of the People” on Feb. 6.

Who’s Laughing Now: Zelensky or Putin?

Ukraine’s incoming comedian president has sent mixed signals on Russia. But the Kremlin may not sit still while he figures out a policy.

Volodymyr Zelensky celebrates after the announcement of the first exit poll results in the second round of Ukraine’s presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Kiev on April 21.

Ukraine’s Pretend President Now Faces a Real Test

In his fight against corruption, Zelensky will face real challenges—not least from his own constituents.

Indonesian workers transport ballot boxes for the upcoming general elections at the Bonto Matinggi village in Maros, South Sulawesi, on April 16. (Daeng Mansur/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

In recent days, Washington raced to decipher the Mueller report and Indonesian voters cast ballots at more than 800,000 polling stations.

Ukrainian presidential candidate Volodymyr Zelensky enters a hall in Kiev on March 6, 2019. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Putin Should Fear Ukraine’s Russia-Friendly Front-Runner

The Kremlin will soon wish it were still dealing with a Ukrainian president who so much resembled its own.

Delegates sing the Ukrainian national anthem during the first congress of the new political party National Corps, created from the members of Azov civil corps and veterans of Azov regiment in Kiev on October 14, 2016.

There’s One Far-Right Movement That Hates the Kremlin

Ukraine’s Azov movement is hostile to Russia, friendly to neo-Nazis, and inspired by France’s new right. It’s not running in Ukraine’s presidential elections because it plans to win power by playing a long game.

A Ukrainian voter examines her ballot at a polling station during the first round of the Ukrainian presidential elections in Kiev on March 31. (Sergei Chuzavkov/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)

FP’s Guide to the Ukrainian Election

Eight things to read ahead of a crucial vote.

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