Ukraine

The Ukrainian actor and comedian Volodymyr Zelensky on set in Kiev, Ukraine, during filming of  “Servant of the People” on Feb. 6.

Who’s Laughing Now: Zelensky or Putin?

Ukraine’s incoming comedian president has sent mixed signals on Russia. But the Kremlin may not sit still while he figures out a policy.

Volodymyr Zelensky celebrates after the announcement of the first exit poll results in the second round of Ukraine’s presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Kiev on April 21.

Ukraine’s Pretend President Now Faces a Real Test

In his fight against corruption, Zelensky will face real challenges—not least from his own constituents.

Indonesian workers transport ballot boxes for the upcoming general elections at the Bonto Matinggi village in Maros, South Sulawesi, on April 16. (Daeng Mansur/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

In recent days, Washington raced to decipher the Mueller report and Indonesian voters cast ballots at more than 800,000 polling stations.

Ukrainian presidential candidate Volodymyr Zelensky enters a hall in Kiev on March 6, 2019. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Putin Should Fear Ukraine’s Russia-Friendly Front-Runner

The Kremlin will soon wish it were still dealing with a Ukrainian president who so much resembled its own.

Delegates sing the Ukrainian national anthem during the first congress of the new political party National Corps, created from the members of Azov civil corps and veterans of Azov regiment in Kiev on October 14, 2016.

There’s One Far-Right Movement That Hates the Kremlin

Ukraine’s Azov movement is hostile to Russia, friendly to neo-Nazis, and inspired by France’s new right. It’s not running in Ukraine’s presidential elections because it plans to win power by playing a long game.

A Ukrainian voter examines her ballot at a polling station during the first round of the Ukrainian presidential elections in Kiev on March 31. (Sergei Chuzavkov/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)

FP’s Guide to the Ukrainian Election

Eight things to read ahead of a crucial vote.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko in Kiev on Feb. 15, 2015. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Petro Poroshenko’s Last-Minute Nationalist Makeover

Ukraine’s president is making a desperate gambit to win re-election—and to remain politically relevant if he loses.

A boy points at cardboard cutouts depicting, from left to right, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Ukrainian oligarch Ihor Kolomoisky, and Ukrainian presidential candidates Yulia Tymoshenko and Oleksandr Shevchenko during a protest in the center of Kiev on March 29. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

In Ukraine’s Election, Pro-Russian Candidates Can’t Win

By occupying the regions of the country that most favor it, Moscow has undermined its own position in Ukrainian politics. Here’s why it still won’t leave.

The Ukrainian actor and comedian Volodymyr Zelensky on set in Kiev, Ukraine, during filming of  “Servant of the People” on Feb. 6.

Ukraine’s TV President Is Dangerously Pro-Russian

Volodymyr Zelensky could become the country’s next real-life leader. If his show is any guide, Ukrainians should be worried.

Supporters of Ukrainian presidential candidate Yulia Tymoshenko at a pre-election rally in Kiev on March 29. (Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images)

Ukraine’s Election Will Test the Strength of Its Democracy

The outcome of the vote is not nearly as important as the quality of the electoral process.

A boy points at cardboard cutouts depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin  and presidential candidates Yulia Tymoshenko and Oleksandr Shevchenko during a protest in Kiev on March 29. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Ukraine’s Election Is a Mess—and That’s Exactly What Putin Wants

A chaotic campaign, feuding oligarchs, and Russian disinformation efforts have combined to shake public faith in the electoral process.

A campaign portrait of Dutch far-right Forum for Democracy (FvD) party Thierry Baudet is pictured next to alcool bottles during a provincial elections party electoral gathering in Zeist on March 20, 2019. - Netherland's Prime Minister is set to lose his majority in parliament's upper house after FvD surged in today's provincial elections, according to an exit poll. (Photo by Bart Maat / ANP / AFP) / Netherlands OUT        (Photo credit should read BART MAAT/AFP/Getty Images)

The New Face of the Dutch Far-Right

Thierry Baudet once called politicians brain-dead. Now his upstart white nationalist movement has eclipsed Geert Wilders and won more Senate seats than the prime minister’s party.

Workers spray contaminated houses within the “no-go” cordon around Chernobyl (Igor Kostin/Sygma via Getty Images)

Meltdown at Chernobyl

On the podcast: A journalist reconstructs the world’s worst nuclear disaster.

People attend a rally for Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko in Kiev on March 17. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty)

Ukraine’s Poroshenko Paradox

In upcoming elections, the incumbent president may well lose to a man who plays one on TV.

A Ukrainian soldier stands guard aboard the military vessel "Dondass" moored in Mariupol, the Sea of Azov port on Nov. 27, 2018, after three Ukrainian navy vessels were forcibly seized off the coast of Crimea by Russian forces.

Russia’s Next Land Grab Won’t Be in an Ex-Soviet State. It Will Be in Europe.

First he came for Georgia, then for Ukraine. Vladimir Putin’s next target is likely to be a non-NATO nation in the EU.

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech under the rain during celebrations for Navy Day in Baltiysk in the Kaliningrad region on July 26, 2015.

Don’t Believe the Russian Hype

Moscow’s missile capabilities in the Baltic Sea region are not nearly as dangerous as they seem.

Italy's 5-Star Movement party leader Beppe Grillo on May 19, 2014 in Rome.   (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)

Comedians Will Soon Rule the World

It’s no accident that a growing number of international comics are running for office—and winning.

Joan Wong illustration for Foreign Policy/Photos by Andriy OnufriyenkoSTR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

You Only Wish You Had Ukraine’s Democracy

Despite attacks from abroad and corruption at home, Ukrainian democracy isn't failing—it's thriving.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron were all smiles just weeks ago on Jan. 22, but that could change after Paris bucked Berlin’s hopes of building a Russian pipeline. (Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images)

France and Germany Face Off Over Russian Pipeline

Though Berlin badly wants it built, Paris is set to side with the EU on new rules intended to contain Moscow.

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