United Nations

TIJUANA, MEXICO - JANUARY 27:  A view of the US-Mexican border fence at Playas de Tijuana on January 27, 2017 in Tijuana, Mexico. U.S. President Donald Trump announced a proposal to impose a 20 percent tax on all imported goods from Mexico to pay for the border wall between the United States and Mexico. Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto canceled a planned meeting with President Trump over who would pay for Trump's campaign promise to build a border wall.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

From the border wall to billionaire presidential candidates.

The United Nations General Assembly Hall on May 12, 2006. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Haley Tried to Block Appointment of Chinese Diplomat to Key U.N. Post. He Got the Job Anyway.

As the United States pulls back from the world body, experts say it is ceding influence to China.

Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales at a press conference with U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley in Guatemala City on Feb. 28, 2018. (Johan Ordoñez/AFP/Getty Images)

Corrupt Guatemalans’ GOP Lifeline

U.S. Republicans are weakening a U.N. anti-corruption investigation into President Jimmy Morales. What are they getting in exchange?

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres. (Luiz Rampelotto/NurPhoto via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Baby Steps Toward a Feminist United Nations

Women’s rights advocates are holding Secretary-General António Guterres accountable.

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet attends the opening day of the 39th session of the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva on Sept. 10, 2018. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Sought to Derail Michelle Bachelet’s Bid for Top U.N. Human Rights Job

The Trump administration was troubled by her views on abortion, Israel, and Latin America.

Syrian refugees, stuck between the Jordanian and Syrian borders, wait to cross into Jordan at the Hadalat border crossing on Jan. 14, 2016. (Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

Investing in Low-Wage Jobs Is the Wrong Way to Reduce Migration

Unless would-be migrants can build lives with dignity—which poorly paid, export-oriented jobs do not provide—they will continue to seek ways to move on.

Demonstrators hold up a giant doggie biscuit reading “corruption” during a rally in support of the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala City on Jan. 12. (Orlando Estrada/AFP/Getty Images)

Guatemala’s ‘Slow-Motion Coup’ Rolls Onward

The continuing crackdown on a corruption investigatory body could allow impunity to flourish ahead of this year’s elections.

Demonstrators arrive to protest against a request to release former Ivory Coast's president Laurent Gbagbo in front of the Conseil National des Droits de l'Homme on Jan. 14, in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. (Sia Kambou/ AFP/Getty Images)

Peacebuilding’s Poster Child Is Losing Its Shine

Ivory Coast is often held up as a post-conflict success. That could all fall apart.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

A Venezuelan family at the Simon Bolivar International Bridge in the Colombian border city of Cucuta on January 10. (Schneyder Mendoza/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s Why Colombia Opened Its Arms to Venezuelan Migrants—Until Now

For years, Colombians fleeing violence left for Venezuela. Now mass migration flows the other way.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is greeted by senior North Korean officials at Sunan International Airport in Pyongyang on July 6, 2018. (Andrew Harnik/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. to Ease Limits on Humanitarian Aid to North Korea

Aid groups welcome the move, but it’s not likely to unlock stalled nuclear negotiations.

Opposition candidates Felix Tshisekedi (right), Martin Fayulu (second from right), and the head of the African Union Election Observation Mission, former interim Malian President Dioncounda Traoré (second from left), leave after a joint meeting on Jan. 2 in Kinshasa. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

African Leaders Must Act to Stop Electoral Fraud in Congo

South Africa and Angola have influence. They must use it to ensure that the Congolese government respects the will of voters.

A view of an 800-hectare solar farm in Pirapora, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, on Nov. 9, 2017. (Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil Was a Global Leader on Climate Change. Now It’s a Threat.

Jair Bolsonaro’s government could roll back decades of progress on clean energy and reducing deforestation.

A protester holds a placard with the image of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a demonstration outside the Saudi Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Oct. 25, 2018. (Lakruwan  Wanniarachichi/AFP/Getty Images)

Getting Away With Murder

Why the campaign to hold Saudi Arabia accountable for Jamal Khashoggi’s killing is losing steam.

U.S. President Donald Trump prepares to address the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 25. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Trump’s War on the World Order

Five Reads: The best Foreign Policy stories of 2018 on multilateralism.

Zaida Catalán at work with U.N. colleague Michael Sharp. (Courtesy of Elizabeth Morseby)

U.N. Report Links Congolese Government to Murder of American and Swede

Suspect’s death in prison suggests authorities might be suppressing evidence.

A blanket of snow covers the North Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, January 12, 2011. (Photo credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Another Trump Loyalist Joins the National Security Council

Elizabeth Erin Walsh will oversee America’s troubled relations with the United Nations.

Armed Houthi separatists brandish their weapons as they gather in the capital Sanaa on Dec. 13.   (Photo credit: Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Yemen’s Torment Finally Ending?

The latest cease-fire raises hopes, but officials fear war could break out again.

Children gather around a stainless steel can of soy milk at a day care in Tongchon, North Korea, on Dec. 3. (John Lehmann for First Steps)

Washington Wants Pyongyang to Choose: Humanitarian Aid or Nukes

The United States is hampering some aid groups from fighting tuberculosis and other diseases in North Korea.

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