United States

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C. in December 1987. (AFP/Getty Images)

When Ronnie Met Mikhail​

On our podcast: As Trump sits down with Putin, we look back at a summit in Reykjavik that helped end the Cold War.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres and U.S. President Donald Trump at U.N. headquarters in New York, on Sept. 18, 2017. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

White House Wants to Know Political Leanings of Job Applicants at the U.N.

New questionnaire asks about public statements, support for politicians.

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

The New Economy’s Old Business Model Is Dead

Tech companies are used to pairing big revenues with small labor forces. But they’ll soon be forced to become massive job creators.

Musician turned politician Robert Kyagulanyi (C) is joined by other activists on July 11, 2018 in Kampala, Uganda during a protest against a controversial tax on the use of social media.

Africa’s Attack on Internet Freedom

While Washington turns a blind eye, autocrats across the continent are muzzling their citizens online.

Britain's then-foreign secretary Boris Johnson, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, and U.S. President Donald Trump arrive for a working dinner meeting at the NATO summit at the NATO headquarters, in Brussels, on May 25, 2017.

Boris Johnson’s Great Leap Forward

Britain’s conservatives were once known for sensible stewardship of the economy. Now, the Tory Maoists are blowing it up.

A man protests against Brexit outside the Houses of Parliament in London July 5. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

‘Take Back Control’? Brexit Is Tearing Britain Apart

Prime Minister Theresa May thinks it’s her duty to deliver Brexit, but the outcome could entail splitting her party and impoverishing Britain.

John Tomac illustration for Foreign Policy

First They Came for the Immigrants. Then They Came for the Robots.

Politicians must prepare voters for automation; otherwise, opportunistic populists will seize the agenda.

U.S. President Gerald Ford (L) speaks with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev (R) during the European Summit focused on Security and Cooperation on August 7, 1975 in Helsinki.

Once Upon a Time, Helsinki Meant Human Rights

Trump’s summit with Putin risks tarnishing a legacy of Republican moral leadership.

U.S. President Donald Trump chats with Russia's President Vladimir Putin as they attend the APEC Economic Leaders' Meeting, part of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation leaders' summit in the central Vietnamese city of Danang on November 11, 2017.

Trump Should Strike a Deal With Putin on Syria

The United States won’t get everything it wants, but it would be wise to protect Washington’s remaining interests before it’s too late.

Russian Matryoshka dolls depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Donald Trump are on sale in the Ruslania book store in Helsinki on July 9. (Timo Jaakonaho/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump-Putin Summit’s Potential Nuclear Fallout

When the U.S. and Russian presidents meet in Helsinki, the biggest risk won't be on everyone's radar.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and aides in Pyongyang on July 6. (Andrew Harnik/AFP/Getty Images)

The Singapore Honeymoon Is Over

Trump in Singapore was spectacle. Pompeo in Pyongyang is the grim reality.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks about the release of the Trafficking in Persons report at the State Department in Washington on June 28. (Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

New U.S. Policy Raises Risk of Deportation for Immigrant Victims of Trafficking

The policy also makes it harder for law enforcement to investigate traffickers.

Flags with the logo and the World Cup 2018 mascot Zabivaka are seen in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow on June 30, 2018 during the Russia 2018 World Cup football tournament. (Photo by Vasily MAXIMOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of the 2018 World Cup

War is politics by other means — and so is the World Cup.

U.S. President Donald Trump takes part in a welcoming ceremony with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017. (Thomas Peter-Pool/Getty Images)

Chinese Investment in the U.S. Tanks Amid Major Policy Crackdowns

With or without a trade war, Chinese foreign direct investment to the United States won’t stop tumbling anytime soon.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador gestures after voting during general elections, in Mexico City, on July 1, 2018.

López Obrador Is a Pragmatist, Not an Ideologue

Don’t expect Mexico’s new president to radically shift the country’s approach to foreign policy.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) shakes hands with China's President Xi Jinping (R) before the G20 leaders' family photo in Hangzhou on September 4, 2016.
(GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

Japan’s China Deals Are Pure Pragmatism

Even Donald Trump can't push Tokyo into Beijing's arms.

Family members shout slogans as they wait outside the Kobar prison in north Khartoum to welcome their loved ones after Sudan released dozens of opposition activists Feb. 18 who were arrested in January when authorities cracked down on protests against rising food prices. (Ebrahim Hamid/AFP/Getty Images)

Sanctions Against Sudan Didn’t Harm an Oppressive Government — They Helped It

The end of economic isolation hasn’t brought a financial windfall or more freedom. Instead, the regime is as strong as ever while ordinary people suffer.

U.S. forces near the northern Syrian village of Darbasiyah on April 28, 2017. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Three Months After U.S. Freeze, Syrian Recovery Stuck in Limbo

Short on funding, U.S. and European programs designed to help rebuild after the Islamic State are faltering.

A Muslim man walks by the "separation barrier" or "security fence" in East Jerusalem on November 27, 2014 in Jerusalem, Israel.

An Israeli-Palestinian Confederation Can Work

The two-state solution is dead. Most one-state solutions are unacceptable to the other side. There is, however, a viable peace plan that appeals to both.

U.S. President Donald Trump takes part in a welcoming ceremony with China's President Xi Jinping on November 9, 2017 in Beijing, China.   (Thomas Peter-Pool/Getty Images)

The U.S. Can’t Afford to Demonize China

The relationship between Beijing and Washington is collapsing fast, to everyone’s detriment.

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