United States

A member of staff poses for a photograph at a workspace in the National Cyber Security Centre on Feb. 14, 2017 in London, England. (Carl Court/Getty Images)

How to Regulate the Internet Without Becoming a Dictator

The British model of filtering data rather than content can protect citizens while preserving an open internet.

U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar, speaks in Washington on Feb. 7. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

How (and How Not) to Talk About the Israel Lobby

There’s a difference between fair and unfair criticisms of AIPAC—and it’s time everyone, including AIPAC, acknowledges it.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walks with U.S. President Donald Trump during a break in talks at their summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

North Korea Needs a Real Deal, Not a Trump Special

The Hanoi summit can be a step forward—if both sides commit.

French president Emmanuel Macron (L) and his Egyptian counterpart Abdel Fattah al-Sisi (R) take part in an official diner at the Al Massah hotel, in Cairo, on Jan. 28, 2019.

Western Leaders Are Promoting Dictatorship, Not Democracy, in Egypt

Emmanuel Macron’s visit to Cairo and Donald Trump’s cheerleading have bolstered Abdel Fattah al-Sisi as he faces popular protest over his latest power grab.

U.S. President Donald Trump and then-Defense Secretary James Mattis attend a cabinet meeting in the White House on March 8, 2018. (Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)

Mattis Was the Best Secretary of Defense Trump Could Have Had

In grading him, we must adjust for the difficulty of the assignment.

Paramilitary police officers stand guard near a Starbucks in the Beijing Railway Station on Feb. 2 ahead of the Lunar New Year. (Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images)

How Beijing Could Unmake Howard Schultz’s Billions

Corporate interests and political power are a dangerous mix for a wannabe president.

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, and former President Barack Obama at the Washington National Cathedral on Dec. 5, 2018. (Alex Brandon/Getty Images)

Trump Is America’s First Contradiction-in-Chief

The United States has never had a military leader as bold, naive, and arrogant as the current president.

Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as La Bestia in Las Patronas, Veracruz state, Mexico, to travel through Mexico to reach the United States on Aug. 9, 2018. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Isn’t Helping Refugees. It’s Depriving Them of Their Rights.

The humanitarian visas offered to migrants don’t allow them to work, study, or receive benefits while letting the Mexican government duck its responsibilities under international law.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel tours the German submarine, U33, on Aug. 31, 2006 in Warnemuende, Germany. (Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)

Why Some Countries Are Pathologically Shy

Six reasons some powerful states punch below their weight for lengthy periods.

Chinese pedestrians walk past a Huawei store in Beijing on Jan. 29. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

We Can’t Tell if Chinese Firms Work for the Party

Huawei claims to be an independent firm, but China's own laws mandate a different reality.

Members of the mostly Kurdish People’s Protection Units, part of the Syrian Democratic Forces, gather in the Syrian town of Shadadi on Sept. 11, 2018. (Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Kurdish Commander Laments American Betrayal, Urges U.S. to ‘Be Loyal’

Trump’s plan to withdraw troops from Syria leaves U.S. ally at the mercy of old enemies.

Venezuela's opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaidó speaks to the press at the Federal Legislative Palace, in Caracas, on February 4, 2019.

Recognizing Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s Leader Isn’t a Coup. It’s an Embrace of Democracy.

Treating the Maduro regime as illegitimate, sanctioning its top officials, and sending aid despite a blockade will hasten its demise and speed the transition to democratic governance.

Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum on June 1, 2017. (Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s How Trump Can Make Better Use of Corporate Sanctions

The U.S. president’s deal with Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska should teach policymakers a sharp lesson.

Donald Trump eats pizza at his office in Trump Tower on April 1, 2005 in New York City. (Evan Agostini/Getty Images)

The Middle East Doesn’t Admire America Anymore

What a late-night meal in Italy taught me about U.S. power in the Arab world.

Supporters of  Hezbollah hold posters of Iran's Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and the movement's slain former military commander, Imad Mughniyeh, on Sept. 20, 2018 in Beirut.

From Rogue to Regular

What will it take for Washington to accept Iran as a “normal” state?

Then-British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, and U.S. President Donald Trump arrive for a working dinner meeting at the NATO summit in Brussels, on May 25, 2017.

Don’t Fear the Deep State. It’s the Shallow State That Will Destroy Us.

Populists like to blame elites, but from Israel to Britain to the United States their crusade against hardworking civil servants is undermining the foundations of democracy.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks to the press in Caracas on Jan. 31. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

Inside the U.S. decision to get behind Congo’s election and how the United States failed Afghan women.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu (R), and Syrian Armed Forces' chief of staff Ali Abdullah Ayyoub (L) inspecting a military parade in the northwestern Syrian province of Latakia.

What Putin Really Wants in Syria

Russia never sought to be a small-time fixer in the Middle East. Its goal was to reclaim its status as a global power broker.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.