Venezuela

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez addresses supporters during a campaign rally on August 3, 2012. (JUAN BARRETO/AFP/GettyImages)

Chávez’s Real Legacy Is Disaster

It's easy to blame Maduro, but the seeds of calamity were sown by his predecessor.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton in the White House in Washington on Oct. 3.

Bolton Is Building a Confrontational Latin America Strategy

The Trump administration is right to call out the region’s rogues for their destabilizing behavior.

A man shows off a gold stone at a gold mine in El Callao, Venezuela, on Feb. 25, 2017. (Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Fool’s Gold in Venezuela

New sanctions on exports of the natural resource will punish Ankara more than Caracas.

Jair Bolsonaro looks on during a press conference he called to announce his intention to run for the Brazilian presidency in the October 2018 election, in Rio de Janeiro on August 10, 2017. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images)

Jair Bolsonaro’s Model Isn’t Berlusconi. It’s Goebbels.

The far-right Brazilian leader isn’t just another conservative populist. His propaganda campaign has taken a page straight from the Nazi playbook.

Venezuelan migrants living in Medellin, Colombia, sleep as they wait to attend the second Job Fair for Venezuelans in Colombia on Sept. 27. (Joaquin Sarmiento/AFP/Getty Images)

Venezuela’s Collapse Threatens Colombia’s Hard-Won Stability

Washington must help Bogotá shoulder the burden of refugees.

Venezuelan refugees rest on a roadside in Pacaraima, Brazil, on Aug. 20. (Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Closed-Door Policy

A showdown between Brasília and the rural state of Roraima could seal the country to refugees from Venezuela.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a press conference on Sept. 26 on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly in New York. (Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images photos)

U.N. Brief: Trump Says China Out to Get Him; Venezuela’s Besieged Leader Comes to Turtle Bay

The U.S. president presides over a defiant Security Council that still loves the Iran nuclear deal.

A health worker shouts slogans demanding fair and higher wages during a protest of the lack of medical supplies and poor conditions in hospitals, in front of a line of police  in Caracas on Aug. 16. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Ramps Up Pressure on Venezuela, But Maduro Keeps Hanging On

The United States has announced new sanctions on Venezuela and may threaten further action—but there’s little sign that will bring the regime down anytime soon.

Nicolas Maduro delivers a speech outside the presidential palace in Caracas on March 12, 2015. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Don’t Focus on Regime Change in Venezuela

How Maduro has held on to power, and why what follows him won’t likely be better.

Venezuelan security forces check a nearby building after a drone attack on President Nicolás Maduro  in Caracas on Aug. 4. (Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images)

Consumer Drones Are Propaganda Tools, Not Killing Machines

The Maduro attack shows that the threat of drones in private hands is all smoke and noise.

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How Venezuela Struck It Poor

The tragic — and totally avoidable — self-destruction of one of the world’s richest oil economies.

Venezuelan opposition leader Maria Corina Machado (C) takes part in a women's march in Caracas on May 6, 2017.

Don’t Let Venezuela’s Government Smear the Opposition’s Brightest Star

Maduro’s autocratic regime is going after María Corina Machado because she is fearless and incorruptible. She needs Washington’s support.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak at an OPEC meeting in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Close to Agreement to Open the Oil Taps

With or without Iranian cooperation, extra barrels of crude could help meet rising demand. But there’s still reason to fear a price spike later this year.

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro at a press conference in Bogotá on June 14. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Hugo Chávez Is Haunting Colombia’s Election

Some Colombians fear that their country could go the way of Venezuela.

Members of the Venezuelan National Guard take part in a ceremony on May 15, ahead of the May 20 presidential election, in Caracas. (Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time for a Coup in Venezuela

Only nationalists in the military can restore a legitimate constitutional democracy.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

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