Venezuela

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How Venezuela Struck It Poor

The tragic — and totally avoidable — self-destruction of one of the world’s richest oil economies.

Venezuelan opposition leader Maria Corina Machado (C) takes part in a women's march in Caracas on May 6, 2017.

Don’t Let Venezuela’s Government Smear the Opposition’s Brightest Star

Maduro’s autocratic regime is going after María Corina Machado because she is fearless and incorruptible. She needs Washington’s support.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak at an OPEC meeting in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Close to Agreement to Open the Oil Taps

With or without Iranian cooperation, extra barrels of crude could help meet rising demand. But there’s still reason to fear a price spike later this year.

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro at a press conference in Bogotá on June 14. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Hugo Chávez Is Haunting Colombia’s Election

Some Colombians fear that their country could go the way of Venezuela.

Members of the Venezuelan National Guard take part in a ceremony on May 15, ahead of the May 20 presidential election, in Caracas. (Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time for a Coup in Venezuela

Only nationalists in the military can restore a legitimate constitutional democracy.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

A member of the national guard fires his shotgun at opposition demonstrators during clashes in Caracas on July 28, 2017. (Carlos Becerra/AFP/Getty Images)

The Perils of a Putsch in Venezuela

Encouraging a coup in Caracas will give Russia and China a foothold in the United States’ backyard.

Sisal Creative illustration for Foreign Policy; Sean Money and Elizabeth Fay for Foreign Policy

The End of Human Rights?

Learning from the failure of the Responsibility to Protect and the International Criminal Court.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto during the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S.-Mexico Relationship Has Survived and Thrived Under Trump

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the neighbors are finding ways to make it work.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, left, and Cuban President Raul Castro in Havana, Cuba, on Dec. 14, 2017. (Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images)

Cuba Is Making the Crisis in Venezuela Worse

Putting pressure on Caracas means holding Havana accountable.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks during a joint press conference with Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray in Mexico City on Feb. 23, 2017.
(Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Tillerson Praises Monroe Doctrine, Warns Latin America of ‘Imperial’ Chinese Ambitions

The secretary of state kicks off his multicountry tour trying to get the region to rally behind Trump.

Bitcoin and other financial innovations are proliferating, Jan. 1, 2013. (Zach Copley/Flickr)

U.S. Sanctions Weapon Is Under Threat — but Not From Bitcoin

Forget cryptocurrencies. The real threat to American sanctions power is rapid technological innovation in finance.

(Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

How to Stand Up For Human Rights in the Age of Trump

Western democracies that were once reliable defenders of human rights have been consumed by a nativist backlash, leaving an open field for dictators and demagogues.

A pro-government activist holds a portrait of late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, during a demonstration on Aug. 14, 2017. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

In 2018, Chavismo’s Time May Finally Run Out

U.S. policy toward Venezuela is changing — and so are political dynamics in Latin America.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro speaks in Havana, Cuba, on Dec. 14, 2017. (Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images)

Why More Sanctions Won’t Help Venezuela

The people, not the government, will pay the price.

A demonstrator catches fire, after the gas tank of a police motorbike exploded, during clashes in a protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas on May 3. (Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images)

10 Conflicts to Watch in 2018

From North Korea to Venezuela, here are the conflicts to watch in 2018.

Iranians show ink-stained fingers after casting their ballots on May 19. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Not a Totally Fake Democracy, Study Says

A new survey shows a country with a constrained but active body politic, contrary to plenty of D.C. conventional wisdom.

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Trump Administration Slaps Economic Sanctions on Venezuela

It’s not an oil embargo. But it does tighten the screws on the Maduro regime.

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