War

Janine di Giovanni in Helmand province, Afghanistan, in January 2010.

The First Draft of History

Why the decline of foreign reporting makes for worse foreign policy.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed looks on at the House of Peoples Representatives in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on Nov. 30, 2020.

All Is Not Quiet on Ethiopia’s Western Front

How Addis Ababa deals with ethnic violence in the region of Benishangul-Gumuz will determine the country’s future.

Members of the Somali military watch as firefighters work to extinguish a blaze after a car bomb exploded in Mogadishu on Jan. 29, 2019.

10 Conflicts to Watch in 2021

The world in 2021 will be haunted by the legacies of 2020: an ongoing pandemic, an economic crisis, Donald Trump’s divisive presidency—and new threats emanating from wars and climate change.

A member of the hacking group Red Hacker Alliance uses a website that monitors global cyberattacks on his computer at their office in Dongguan, China.

NATO, We Want to Go to War With You

Wargames can provide essential cybersecurity training for soldiers. But they won’t succeed unless the players confront real, independent hackers.

A young man pushes a cart in front of Tigrayan flags at Martyrs Square in the city of Mekelle, on Sept. 9, 2020.

The War in Tigray Is a Fight Over Ethiopia’s Past—and Future

The current conflict is the latest battle in a long-running war over the country’s identity as a unitary or federal state. The United States can restore its credibility as an honest broker by helping resolve it.

A beggar who said he lost his leg from a mine injury is seen in traffic on Sept. 21, 2019 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Afghanistan Needs Truth Before It Can Have Reconciliation

Politicians and warlords have benefited from decades of violence. The victims of the country’s endless wars could provide the key to a lasting peace.

A Russian peacekeeper in Nagorno-Karabakh

Russian Troops in Nagorno-Karabakh ‘Clearly a Win for Moscow’

The Russian-brokered cease-fire that ended six weeks of fighting means soldiers on the ground—either as peacekeepers or as a vanguard of Putin’s latest garrison state.

People walk in front of Ethiopian flags marking the new Ethiopian Millennium on Sept. 10, 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Ethiopia’s Government and the TPLF Leadership Are Not Morally Equivalent

The leaders of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front are seeking to manipulate the international community into backing a power-sharing deal that grants it impunity for past crimes and gives it far more future influence over the country than it deserves.

Ethiopian soldiers and thousands of mourners attend the official state funeral of Ethiopia's late prime minister, Meles Zenawi

Tigray’s War Against Ethiopia Isn’t About Autonomy. It’s About Economic Power.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is fighting the country’s revanchist old regime, which is intent on recapturing the economic and political influence it once held.

An undated poster, circulated during World War I, by the Franco-American Union.

The United States Can’t Sleepwalk Into the Coming Military Revolutions

European leaders misjudged World War I. America shouldn’t repeat their mistake.

French gendarmes secure the area around the Notre-Dame de l'Assomption Basilica in Nice on Oct. 31, two days after a knife attacker killed three people.

Forget U.N. Peacekeepers: Send in the Gendarmes

In gray-zone conflicts, police don’t have the skills to bring peace and full-scale military interventions can lead to escalation. A force that can bring stability is needed.

A man enters a polling station on the day of Tigray's regional elections, on Sept. 9, 2020 in Mekelle.

Is Ethiopia Headed for Civil War?

Abiy Ahmed’s military move against the Tigray region could spark a conflict with the party that once dominated Ethiopian politics—and tear the country apart. 

Peter Pellegrino, the U.S. Naval War College's senior military analyst for wargaming, briefs participants in a wargame reenactment of the Battle of Jutland on the college’s tiled floor in Newport, Rhode Island, on May 10, 2016.

What to Do When Predicting Pandemics

Simulations have forecast disastrous consequences before. Here’s how to act on the lessons of wargames before they come to pass.

Young fighters sit on a blanket in downtown Bambari after over 350 of Central African Republic's child soldiers were released by armed groups honoring a deal signed with UNICEF, on May 14, 2015.

The United Nations Isn’t Jeopardizing Children in Conflict Zones. It’s Protecting Them.

Shaming violators alone won’t stop the use of child soldiers and other human rights abuses. Defending children’s rights requires engagement with governments and armed groups.

An aerial photo shows the explosion over Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945, shortly after the "Little Boy" atomic bomb was dropped.

The Hiroshima Effect

Seventy-five years after the first nuclear bomb fell, we are grateful it hasn’t happened again, mystified it didn’t, and terrified it still might.

A federal officer pepper sprays a protester in front of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, on July 20. Nathan Howard/Getty Images

How the Coronavirus Crisis Is Silencing Dissent and Sparking Repression

A look at how protests, political violence, and conflict have played out during the pandemic.

A displaced Syrian woman

Guilt by Location

Around the world, security forces use forced displacement as a means of sorting populations. To fix the global displacement crisis, it’s critical to understand how and why they do it.

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