War

Newly released child soldiers wait in a line for their registration during the release ceremony in Yambio, South Sudan, on February 7, 2018.(STEFANIE GLINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

When Soldiers Go Back to Being Children

The unlikely success of Sudan and the FARC proves minors can be protected from conflict.

War correspondent Marie Colvin in Peeblesshire, Scotland, on Aug. 20, 2011. (Writer Pictures via AP Images)

Shot in Sri Lanka, Shelled in Syria

On the podcast: War correspondent Marie Colvin documented the horrors of war until one of them took her life.

Benjamin Netanyahu and Israeli Chief of Staff Gadi Eizenkot give a press conference in Tel Aviv, on Dec. 4, 2018. (Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

Netanyahu’s Toy Soldiers

Israel’s prime minister is now also its defense minister—but he’s mostly interested in the job for PR.

Russian President Vladimir Putin points at a map while inspecting the construction of a bridge across the Kerch Strait, linking Russia and the Crimean peninsula, while aboard a helicopter on March 18, 2016. (Mikhail Klimenty/AFP/Getty Images)

Goodbye Grotius, Hello Putin

Russia’s provocations in the Kerch Strait aren’t just a challenge to Ukraine. Like Beijing in the South China Sea, Moscow is seeking to undermine international maritime law.

Far-right activists hold flares during a rally in support of martial law and cutting ties with Russia in front of the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev on Nov. 26. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Martial Law Is a Test. Will Ukraine’s Democracy Pass?

Ukraine’s parliament resisted President Petro Poroshenko’s call for an extended state of emergency—but the battle isn’t over yet.

A Ukrainian soldier patrols a boat moored in Mariupol, Ukraine, on the Sea of Azov on Nov. 27. (Sega Volskii/AFP/Getty Images)

Ukraine’s New Front Is Europe’s Big Challenge

There’s plenty Europe should do to push back against Russia’s latest attack on Ukraine.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

A painting of the World War I Battle of Jutland shows the sinking hit of the British battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable shortly before its explosion on May 31, 1916. (Willy Stöwer/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

The U.S. Navy Has Forgotten What It’s Like to Fight

The U.K.'s defeat at Jutland is a reminder of how a victorious force can get lazy.

A French propaganda poster during World War I. (AFP/Getty Images)

Never Forget That World War I Was Also Racist

It wasn’t just nationalism that fueled the 20th century’s first great tragedy.

A Syrian rebel fighter with the National Liberation Front watches towards the regime areas in northwestern Aleppo province on October 9, 2018. (Aaref Watad/AFP/Getty Images)

The New U.N. Envoy to Syria Should Kill the Political Process to Save It

A tougher stance from the United Nations would put pressure on Assad and Putin while improving the lives of ordinary Syrians.

A postcard from World War I shows Kaiser Wilhelm II. (Paul Hauke/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

World War I’s Depressing Lessons for Asia

Trade is no guarantee of peace, and Xi's China is looking worryingly like the Kaiser's Germany.

A convoy of Russian troops makes its way through the mountains in the village of Dzhaba on August 9, 2008 as Georgian troops battled with Russian forces over breakaway provinces.

Ethnic Nationalism Gave Georgia Freedom. Now It Needs Civic Nationalism to Survive.

The Caucasus is a complex ethnic and religious patchwork, and only a shared identity can help Georgians push back against Putin.

A Yemeni child inspects the rubble of a house in Yemen's rebel-held capital Sanaa on August 11, 2016, after it was reportedly hit by a Saudi-led coalition air strike.

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates Are Starving Yemenis to Death

The world was rightly outraged by the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, but the bombs of Mohammed bin Salman and his Emirati allies are killing dozens each day in Yemen.

A member of the Metropolitan Police SWAT team patrols a movie theater before a showing of the film "The Interview" on December 25, 2014 in Washington, DC.

In Cyberwar, There Are Some (Unspoken) Rules

A recent article argues that the lack of legal norms invites cyberconflict. But governments know the price of overreach and are refraining from unleashing their full capabilities.

Former President Barack Obama, former Vice President Al Gore, former President George W. Bush, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrive at the memorial service for Sen. John McCain at the Washington National Cathedral on Sept. 1. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The Foreign-Policy Establishment Reeks of Desperation

After years of failure, elites have only name-calling left.

Yemeni fighters supporting forces loyal to Yemen’s Saudi-backed government take part in a graduation ceremony in Taez, Yemen, on Oct. 27. (Ahman al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images)

The New Front in Yemen’s Civil War Is Jamal Khashoggi

Yemenis can’t stop talking about the journalist’s murder.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh on October 23, 2018. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Is the Next Saddam Hussein

In the 1980s, the United States embraced a brutal Middle Eastern tyrant simply because he opposed Iran. Washington should not repeat the same mistake today.

Deputy Chief Monitor of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine, Alexander Hug (2nd L), reacts as fellow OSCE members (R) look on during a meeting with separatists in Donetsk on July 30, 2014. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

Counting the Dead in Europe’s Forgotten War

The deputy head of the OSCE’s observer mission in Ukraine describes the challenges and frustrations of monitoring the war.

Syrian patients receiving treatment in a basement-turned-clinic in the besieged rebel-held town of Douma, on the outskirts of Damascus, on March 16, 2017.

Bashar al-Assad Is Waging Biological War—By Neglect

By deliberately destroying and degrading public health infrastructure, the Syrian regime is reviving long-eradicated diseases and killing civilians.

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower at NATO's Paris headquarters in 1951. (AFP/Getty Images)

Want to Win the Midterms? Spend Less on War

The intensification of the liberal-neoconservative alliance under Trump is not good news for Democrats.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.