War

Demonstrators hold smoke grenades as they gather in Kyiv, Ukraine.

Zelensky Flounders in Bid to End Ukraine’s War

Pushing a controversial peace agreement, the new president faces blowback in Kyiv that he may not be able to overcome.

Migrants at a detention center in Zawiyah, west of Tripoli, on June 17, 2017.

The U.N. Is Leaving Migrants to Die in Libya

The European Union is funding the Libyan coast guard to keep migrants out of Europe and detain them in a failed state—and that leaves them at the mercy of militias and human traffickers.

A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces, backed by U.S. special operations forces, looks out from a building at the front line in Raqqa, Syria, on Oct. 16, 2017.

The United States Is Done Caring About Syria

A major new report about the Syrian war raises the question of whether Washington ever cared about it in the first place.

Newly recruited Houthi fighters chant slogans as they ride a military vehicle during a gathering in the capital Sanaa to mobilize more fighters to battlefronts to fight pro-government forces in several Yemeni cities, on Jan. 3, 2017.

Saudi Arabia’s Self-Fulfilling Houthi Prophecy

The Yemeni minority group hardly had anything to do with Iran—until the Saudis got involved.

Indian government forces stand guard in the deserted city center of Srinagar on Aug. 15.

Why Indians and Pakistanis Want a War

Most South Asians are too young to have experienced the horrors of the conflicts fought in the region. That’s one reason why they’re quick to clamor for one.

President George W. Bush deliver remarks while flanked by Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai and Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in the Rose Garden at the White House September 27, 2006 in Washington, DC.

We Lost the War in Afghanistan. Get Over It.

After 18 years of war, thousands of lives lost, and hundreds of billions of dollars squandered, the United States accomplished precisely nothing.

Security personnel stand guard on a deserted road during a lockdown in Srinagar, Kashmir, on Aug. 15.

The Future of Kashmir

How India decided to end the area’s autonomous status and what it means for the region.

A statue of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his dog Fala are seen at the FDR Memorial September 20, 2012 in Washington, DC.

There Once Was a President Who Hated War

American elites used to see war as a tragic necessity. Now they’re completely addicted to it.

HP-kissinger-document-1973

Transcript Shows That Kissinger Dreaded All-Out Israeli Victory in Yom Kippur War 

Then-U.S. secretary of state feared too much winning would make Israel harder to influence.

A member of the U.S. military visits Section 60 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, on May 24. Section 60 is the final resting place for U.S. soldiers killed in the United States' most recent wars, especially Iraq and Afghanistan.

Restraint Isn’t Isolationism—and It Won’t Endanger America

Critics of offshore balancing claim a more restrained U.S. foreign policy will breed insecurity. They’re wrong, and their arguments are easily debunked.

Cars pass by a memorial to American soldiers from New York state who were killed in Iraq or Afghanistan, near Canandaigua, New York, on June 4.

Limited Wars Are Forever Wars

A new book looks at why the U.S. military keeps trapping itself in endless conflicts.

Syrian youths walk past a billboard showing a picture of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad wearing sunglasses while dressed in a Field Marshal's camouflage fatigues, on display in the centre of the capital Damascus on July 9, 2018, with a caption below reading in Arabic: "If the country's dust speaks, it will say Bashar al-Assad."

Assad Hasn’t Won Anything

After years of bloody warfare, it’s time to recognize what the Syrian dictator rules over: a chronically violent and chaotic failed state.

Members of the Arizona National Guard listen to instructions on April 9, 2018, at the Papago Park Military Reservation in Phoenix.

The Military Aren’t Heroes or Villains. They’re Us.

The gap between soldiers and civilians is hurting democracies.

The stage for the first U.S. Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, on June 26,

Democrats Face a Defense Spending Conundrum

The U.S. foreign-policy establishment shouldn’t balk at pledges to roll back national security commitments.

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao speaks at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit in Laguna Niguel, California, on Oct. 2, 2018.

Elaine Chao Learned From the Best

The transportation secretary is part of a long line of individuals who’ve bridged China and the United States—and done well for themselves in the process.

Children of members of Lebanon's Shiite Hezbollah movement hold portraits of Hezbollah chief Hasan Nasrallah and Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei during a procession following the mourning period of Ashura in the southern Lebanese city of Nabatieh on Oct. 4, 2017.

Hezbollah Isn’t Iran’s Favorite Proxy Anymore

As tensions with Washington rise, Tehran has discovered the Lebanese militia isn’t up for doing its dirty work.

Document of the Week: The 2002 National Intelligence Estimate on WMDs in Iraq

The Iraq intelligence debacle casts a shadow over the U.S. assessment of a threat from Iran.

Gen. Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagalo, the deputy head of Sudan’s military council, speaks at a news conference in Khartoum on April 30.

The Man Who Terrorized Darfur Is Leading Sudan’s Supposed Transition

The interim vice president, Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagalo, was in charge of the brutal janjaweed militias. Now he is calling the shots in Khartoum.

Members of Warduj’s Afghan Local Police unit in front of their main base in their exile in Bahorak on Aug. 24, 2018.

Beijing Eyes Afghanistan’s Intimate Wars

Afghan militia members driven from their homes square off against Uighur exiles.

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