Washington

Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga (R) leaves the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo on April 5, 2017, after his press conference announcing North Korea's ballistic missile launch into the Sea of Japan.

Japan’s Suga Will Struggle to Pull off Abe’s Defense Transformation

The new Japanese prime minister shares many of outgoing Shinzo Abe’s policies—but isn’t as wedded to Abe’s big overhaul.

A roundtable discussion is held with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s subcommittee on the U.S. strategy for implementing the Women, Peace, and Security Act, on Capitol Hill on June 11, 2019.

With the Women, Peace, and Security Act, Washington Could Be a Model for the World

In congressional hearings this week, it just needs to figure out how to better implement the legislation.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to new National Security Advisor Robert O'Brien

Trump Finally Has the Dangerous Foreign-Policy Process He Always Wanted

The U.S. president's new national security advisor has replaced the White House’s previous chaos with a new type of dysfunction.

Ukrainian serviceman rides atop an armored personnel carrier in Kyiv

Far From the Front Lines, Javelin Missiles Go Unused in Ukraine

Military support to the Eastern European country is at the center of a scandal that threatens to engulf the Trump administration.

Traditional Russian wooden nesting dolls depicting U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a gift shop in central Moscow on July 6, 2017.

‘In Russia We Have Total Nepotism’

A conversation with Karina Orlova, the Washington correspondent for the Echo of Moscow.

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All the Legal Trouble in Trumpworld

Robert Mueller has finished his investigation, but that may be the least of the U.S. president’s worries.

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, hosts a cabinet meeting in the White House on Aug. 16. (Contreras/Pool/Getty Images)

Trump Officials Can’t Rescue Their Reputations With Op-Eds

They argue their actions are saving the republic, but they are really trying to save themselves.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, right, and Sam Brownback, the U.S. ambassador at large for international religious freedom, at a press event for the launch of the department's 2017 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom on May 29 in Washington. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Religious Persecution Is on the Rise. It’s Time for Policymakers and Academics to Take Notice.

“Under Caesar’s Sword,” a new book on the repression of Christians, sheds light on issues that officials from around the world have gathered in Washington to discuss.

A nighttime view of the White House in Washington, D.C., on May 27, 2017. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Russian Troll or Clumsy Publicity Hound?

A Russian media executive says he’s come to Washington to test the limits of American freedom.

Outgoing U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson gives a farewell address to State Department staff in Washington on March 22. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Tillerson Decries ‘Mean-Spirited’ D.C. in Farewell Address

Tillerson gave a four-minute farewell speech to State Department employees. His legacy will last much longer.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends a meeting on November 14, 2017, in Riyadh. (FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Strongmen Are Weaker Than They Look

Authoritarians are on the rise around the world, but history shows they’re mostly helpless.

The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (Wikimedia Commons)

Babylon Revisited: Melancholy Thoughts After a Short Trip to Washington, D.C.

As a young reporter in political Washington in the late 1980s, I noticed that there was a type of person who thrived in the driven, transactional environment of the capital.

WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 17:  Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (2ndR), Defense Secretary James Mattis (R), shake hands with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono (2ndL) and Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera (L), during a meeting of the U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee at the State Department, on August 17, 2017 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Tokyo and Washington Have Another Nuclear Problem

There’s a plutonium arms race brewing in East Asia that could see China, Japan, and South Korea with the capability to make tens of thousands of nuclear weapons.

WASHINGTON, :  The Russian Federation flag flies above the Russian embassy 05 March 2001 in Washington, DC. Accused FBI spy Robert P. Hanssen allegedly tipped off the KGB about the existence of a secret eavesdropping tunnel beneath the embassy. AFP PHOTO/Mario TAMA (Photo credit should read MARIO TAMA/AFP/Getty Images)

A Guide to Russia’s Diplomatic Properties in Washington

Putin’s government owns properties scattered around D.C. What do they all do?

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 26:  The U.S. State Department is shown January 26, 2017 in Washington, DC. Four senior management team members at the State Department resigned January 25, adding to an exodus of career senior foreign service officers who have recently resigned their positions.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

State Department Suspends Yet Another Fellowship Program

Critics fear the next generation of foreign policy talent could wither on the vine as State slashes fellowships.

A convoy of US forces armoured vehicles drives near the village of Yalanli, on the western outskirts of the northern Syrian city of Manbij, on March 5, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DELIL SOULEIMAN        (Photo credit should read DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is How Great-Power Wars Get Started

Not with a bang, but basic strategic confusion in Washington about the links between Syria, Qatar, Iran, and Russia.

MIAMI, FL - JUNE 16:  U.S. President Donald Trump points as he speaks about policy changes he is making toward Cuba at the Manuel Artime Theater in the Little Havana neighborhood on June 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. The President will re-institute some of the restrictions on travel to Cuba and U.S. business dealings with entities tied to the Cuban military and intelligence services.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Why Trump’s Foreign Policy Can’t Be Stopped

There are almost no checks and balances on the administration’s conduct of international affairs. And most Americans are fine with that.