Weapons

Police officers charge toward protesters during a demonstration on June 12 in Hong Kong.

What’s Next for Hong Kong?

Plus: U.S. lawmakers push back against Saudi arms sales, Shinzo Abe visits Iran, and the other stories we're following today.

A Sudanese protester outside Khartoum's army headquarters on June 3, 2019.

What’s Next for Sudan?

Plus: Mexico continues talks at the White House, elections in Denmark, and the other stories we're following today.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo boards a plane before departing London Stansted Airport on May 9, 2019.

Pompeo Goes to Russia

Mike Pompeo meets his counterpart in Russia, violence flares as the military and protesters hash out a transitional government in Sudan, and the U.S.-China trade war rumbles on.

A member of the Bolivarian National Police Special Forces Group holds his gun during an operation against criminal groups in the Petare neighborhood of Caracas on Jan. 25.

Venezuela Is Armed to the Hilt

The country has assembled one of the largest stockpiles of weapons in the Western Hemisphere. Here’s how to prevent it from falling into the wrong hands.

Odette Sansom served as a courier spy in Britain’s Special Operations Executive during World War II. (PA Images via Getty Images)

Writing Women at War

A slate of new releases reexamine gender in conflict.

Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at The Kremlin in Moscow on April 8.

It’s Not Too Late to Stop Turkey From Realigning With Russia

Strains in U.S.-Turkish relations are leading Erdogan into Putin’s embrace. Smart diplomacy and defense assistance can bring America’s NATO ally back into the fold.

Soldiers monitor a protest in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Dec. 15, 2017. (Delmer Membreno/Picture-Alliance/DPA/AP)

Trump Is Sending Guns South as Migrants Flee North

The administration’s push to weaken oversight of gun exports could worsen the Central American refugee crisis.

Russia's MiG-31 supersonic interceptor jets carrying hypersonic Kinzhal missiles fly over Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow on May 9, 2018. (Kirill Kudryatsev/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s New Missiles Are Aimed at the U.S.

But Moscow’s hypersonic weapons may be more bark than bite.

Russian soldiers load an Iskander-M missile launcher during a military exercise at a firing range in Ussuriysk, Russia on Nov. 17, 2016. (Yuri Smityuk/TASS/Getty Images)

Russia’s Conventional Weapons Are Deadlier Than Its Nukes

Withdrawing from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty would take the United States one step forward and many steps back on international security.

A Russian flag flies next to the U.S. Embassy building in Moscow on Oct. 22. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Too Late to Save the INF Treaty

No one should dismiss lightly an agreement that has helped keep the United States and its allies safe for a generation.

An MQ-9 Reaper drone is parked in a hanger at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nevada, on Nov. 17, 2015. (Isaac Brekken/Getty Images)

Trump’s Push to Boost Lethal Drone Exports Reaps Few Rewards

Sources say the U.S. Defense Department is stubbornly resisting the new rules.

U.S. President Donald Trump joins dancers with swords at a welcome ceremony ahead of a banquet at the Murabba Palace in Riyadh on May 20, 2017.

Trump Thinks He’s Helping the U.S.-Saudi Relationship. He’s Hurting It.

By avoiding a credible investigation into Jamal Khashoggi’s killing, dismissing CIA findings, and failing to take advantage of his negotiating leverage, the American president has imperiled the future of an important strategic alliance.

Lassina Zerbo, the executive secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, in Vienna on Sept. 28, 2017. (Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

The Arms Control Believer

Lassina Zerbo isn’t letting the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty go.

(Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy)

A Million Mistakes a Second 

Ultrafast computing is critical to modern warfare. But it also ensures a lot could go very wrong, very quickly. 

TOPSHOT - Brazilian Air Force pilots on Super Tucano airplanes perform aerobatics during the F-Air Colombia 2017 air festival at the Jose Maria Cordova airport in Rionegro, Antioquia department, on July 13, 2017.   / AFP PHOTO / JOAQUIN SARMIENTO        (Photo credit should read JOAQUIN SARMIENTO/AFP/Getty Images)

How War Went Retro and the Pentagon Was Left Behind

The U.S. military has been trying — and failing — to buy a simple counterinsurgency aircraft for more than 10 years. Here’s what went wrong.

An F-35A gets ready to drop a weapon over the Sea Test Range in Point Mugu, California, on Aug. 12, 2016. (Chad Bellay/Lockheed Martin)

The Countries Where F-35 Sales Are Taking Off

Tracking the growing global fleet of stealth fighters.

South Korean soldiers participate in decontamination training.   (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Nukes Aren’t the End of North Korea’s Arsenal

Any deal needs to remember Pyongyang's range of deadly programs.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari arrive for a joint press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 30, 2018.

An Arms Deal Won’t Heal What Ails Muhammadu Buhari

Nigeria’s president is trying to prove he can get from Washington what his predecessor couldn’t, but it might not be enough to get him re-elected.

Jordan’s Chinese CH-4 drone on display at this year’s SOFEX arms show.
(Sharon Weinberger/Foreign Policy)

China Has Already Won the Drone Wars

Chinese companies are proving that America is not first in the UAV export market. Can Trump roll that back?

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