Women

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks to the press in Caracas on Jan. 31. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

Inside the U.S. decision to get behind Congo’s election and how the United States failed Afghan women.

Members of GRYM, a group for women in the Swedish Navy, share coffee aboard the HMS Visby off the coast of Berga, Sweden, on Sept. 18, 2018. (Teresa Fazio for Foreign Policy)

Sisterhood Is Powerful

The Swedish Navy brass responded well to #MeToo. But real change came from the ranks.

An 11-year-old girl cares for her mother as she receives her first dose of chemotherapy at Jamhuriat Hospital in Kabul on July 15, 2017. When 38-year-old Fatema was diagnosed with breast cancer, it took her seven months to gather the money needed for her surgery, and she was forced to delay follow-up treatment until she could borrow money to pay for it. (Kiana Hayeri for Foreign Policy)

America Never Gave Afghan Women a Chance

Washington failed at the most promising path toward stability in Afghanistan: keeping the country’s women alive.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom speaks before the U.N. Security Council meeting on understanding and addressing climate-related security risks in New York on July 11, 2018. (Luiz Rampelotto/Sipa via AP)

Sweden’s Feminist Foreign Policy, Long May It Reign

Stockholm should continue actively pursuing a foreign-policy agenda focused on gender equality. And the world should follow.

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres. (Luiz Rampelotto/NurPhoto via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Baby Steps Toward a Feminist United Nations

Women’s rights advocates are holding Secretary-General António Guterres accountable.

A female mechanized infantry recruit guides her crew as they learn how to repair broken vehicle tracks in Boden, Sweden, on Sept. 12, 2018. (Teresa Fazio for Foreign Policy)

Stand at Attention and Bite the Bullet

The Swedish military had a #MeToo problem. They decided to do something about it.

Hanna Barczyk illustration for Foreign Policy

China’s #MeToo Activists Have Transformed a Generation

A small group of feminists has shifted attitudes—and prompted harsh pushback.

Protesters attend an anti-government demonstration in support of abortion rights in Warsaw on April 9, 2016.

Poland Is Trying to Make Abortion Dangerous, Illegal, and Impossible

Ireland voted to liberalize abortion laws. The far-right government in Warsaw is moving in the opposite direction.

A Nepalese woman prepares to sleep in a chhaupadi hut during her period in Surkhet District, 300 miles west of Kathmandu. Feb. 3, 2017.

In Nepal, Tradition Is Killing Women

The Hindu practice of chhaupadi is dangerous and deadly, but legislation is not enough to stop it.

Voters elected a record number of women to the U.S. Congress in November, including, from left, Kim Schrier, D-Wash., Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Fla., Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, Sharice Davids, D-Kan., and Haley Stevens, D-Mich., seen during an incoming freshman class photo in Washington on Nov. 14. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

2018 Was a Long Women’s March Through Congress

It was a year of quiet, but major, progress for women’s issues in the U.S. government—and 2019 promises even more.

Congresswoman Ilhan Omar speaking to a group of volunteers in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Oct. 13, 2018. (Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty Images)

Saudi Arabia Declares War on America’s Muslim Congresswomen

Gulf Arab monarchies are using racism, bigotry, and fake news to denounce Washington's newest history-making politicians.

A woman displaced by fighting in Taiz sits outside her temporary home with her family on the outskirts of Aden, Yemen, on Oct. 15. (Will Swanson for Foreign Policy)

Women Want to Put Yemen Back Together Again

Men caused the world’s worst humanitarian disaster, but it’s become clear they can’t fix it.

A 26-year-old victim of domestic violence poses for pictures in Moscow on Feb. 3, 2017. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

In Russia, Feminist Memes Buy Jail Time, but Domestic Abuse Doesn’t

A year after the country decriminalized domestic violence, women feel the consequences.

Democratic congressional candidate Ilhan Omar speaks to a group of volunteers in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 13, 2018.

Two Muslim Women Are Headed to Congress. Will They Be Heard?

Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib have won, but the battle for a new brand of feminism in the Democratic Party and within Muslim communities has just begun.

Joanna Chiu (left) speaking at the U.S. launch of NüVoices in New York on Nov. 1. (Jia Guo/SupChina)

Meet the Group Amplifying China’s New Voices

In a male-dominated field, a collective supporting women covering China is wading into uncharted waters.

A woman holds white balloons during a demonstration to demand the endorsement of the peace agreement between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia in Bogota on Nov. 30. (Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Are the Key to Peace

Cease-fire negotiations that exclude them are more likely to fall apart. Here’s how the U.N. can boost their participation at the bargaining table.

Democratic candidate Elaine Luria speaks to a room full of supporters after upsetting incumbent Republican Scott Taylor to win Virginia's 2nd Congressional District in Virginia Beach on Nov. 6. (Stephen M. Katz/The Virginian-Pilot via AP)

Wave of Women and Younger Vets Head to Capitol Hill

People who served after the 9/11 attacks will make up more than half of the veterans on Capitol Hill come January.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd United Nations General Assembly in New York City on Sept. 25. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Inside Trump’s Plan to Scale Back U.N. Resolutions on Sexual Health, Violence Against Women

Internal memos reflect the growing influence of conservative Christians in the Trump administration.

Demonstrators take part in a protest against Brazilian right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 20. (Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

How Women Could Win It for Bolsonaro

Brazil’s far-right presidential front-runner made hateful comments a hallmark of his political life. That hasn’t held him back.

An arrested woman appears before Iraqi judges in a makeshift courtroom in Baghdad on April 17. (Afshin Ismaeli/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Iraq Is Tempting Fate by Punishing Women

The country isn't just flouting international law by collectively punishing the wives of Islamic State fighters—it's inviting a return to war.

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