Women

Actress Shefali Shah in “Delhi Crime.” (Golden Karavan/Netflix)

Delhi Crime and Punishment

Netflix’s hit show Delhi Crime documents the changes rocking Indian society—and not all of them are good.

Foreign Policy illustration

Only Women Can Stop the Apocalypse

Men make nuclear weapons more dangerous. So why do they still dominate the field?

Odette Sansom served as a courier spy in Britain’s Special Operations Executive during World War II. (PA Images via Getty Images)

Writing Women at War

A slate of new releases reexamine gender in conflict.

The astronauts Christina Koch and Nick Hague, who replaced Anne McClain on a recent mission due to a shortage of medium-sized spacesuits, at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 14. (Sergei SavostyanovTASS via Getty Images)

A Place for Women in Space

A lack of medium-sized spacesuits highlights women’s needs in the workplace.

Kelley Currie, the U.S. representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Council, attends a U.N. Security Council meeting in New York City on April 5, 2018. (Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

High-Wire Act Ahead for Trump’s New Women’s Rights Envoy

Tough but torn, Kelley Eckels Currie must find a way to balance her loyalties.

Seungri (C), a former member of the K-pop boy group BIGBANG, bows as he arrives for questioning over criminal allegations at the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency in Seoul on March 14. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

K-Pop’s Sexual Assault Scandal Is the Tip of the Iceberg

Celebrities’ crimes are pushing South Korea’s reckoning with misogyny.

Young men pay their respects to the victims of the mosque attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand on March 16. (Tessa Burrows/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, New Zealand saw its worst-ever terrorist attack, and Boeing aircraft around the world were grounded.

A U.S. Army military policeman stands guard in front of the stage as the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders perform for American forces in Baghdad as part of their military USO tour on Sept. 15, 2007. (John Moore/Getty Images)

From Doughnut Girls to Den Mothers and Cheerleaders

The U.S. military has long relied on women to entertain the troops. Here’s how that’s slowly changing.

Protestors confront police at a rally marking International Women's Day in Istanbul on March 8. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, the world marked International Women’s Day, and the U.S. State Department canceled an award for a Finnish journalist who criticized Trump.

Activists in favor of the legalization of abortion comfort each other outside the National Congress in Buenos Aires after senators rejected a bill to legalize abortion on Aug. 9, 2018. (Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images)

Murdered Women Can’t Celebrate International Women’s Day

Advocates for gender equality in Latin America are making gains, but an epidemic of violence overshadows their progress.

Women march during International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in San Salvador, El Salvador, on Nov. 26, 2018. (Marvin Recinos/AFP/Getty Images)

El Salvador Kills Women as the U.S. Shrugs

Washington helped start an epidemic of violence against women in Central America. Now it’s washing its hands of the problem.

Protesters against the veil, protected by young men, march in central Tehran during demonstrations for women's rights on March 10, 1979. (Bettmann Archives/Getty Images)

The Flame of Feminism Is Alive in Iran

While Western activists defend the right of Muslims to wear the veil, Iranian women are fighting for a bigger cause: choice.

A woman holds a baby as she walks through the door of her house in Sanya, China, on Oct. 12, 2016. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

Get Ready for China’s Baby Quotas

Demographic fears mean a hard future for women's rights.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks to the press in Caracas on Jan. 31. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

Inside the U.S. decision to get behind Congo’s election and how the United States failed Afghan women.

Members of GRYM, a group for women in the Swedish Navy, share coffee aboard the HMS Visby off the coast of Berga, Sweden, on Sept. 18, 2018. (Teresa Fazio for Foreign Policy)

Sisterhood Is Powerful

The Swedish Navy brass responded well to #MeToo. But real change came from the ranks.

An 11-year-old girl cares for her mother as she receives her first dose of chemotherapy at Jamhuriat Hospital in Kabul on July 15, 2017. When 38-year-old Fatema was diagnosed with breast cancer, it took her seven months to gather the money needed for her surgery, and she was forced to delay follow-up treatment until she could borrow money to pay for it. (Kiana Hayeri for Foreign Policy)

America Never Gave Afghan Women a Chance

Washington failed at the most promising path toward stability in Afghanistan: keeping the country’s women alive.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom speaks before the U.N. Security Council meeting on understanding and addressing climate-related security risks in New York on July 11, 2018. (Luiz Rampelotto/Sipa via AP)

Sweden’s Feminist Foreign Policy, Long May It Reign

Stockholm should continue actively pursuing a foreign-policy agenda focused on gender equality. And the world should follow.

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres. (Luiz Rampelotto/NurPhoto via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Baby Steps Toward a Feminist United Nations

Women’s rights advocates are holding Secretary-General António Guterres accountable.

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