women’s rights

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres, U.S. President Donald Trump, and others wait for a meeting to begin at the U.N. headquarters in New York on Sept. 18, 2017. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

At the U.N., America Turns Back the Clock on Women’s Rights

Internal documents show how the U.S. works to stymie progress on women’s health, cultural issues, and climate change.

Protestors confront police at a rally marking International Women's Day in Istanbul on March 8. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, the world marked International Women’s Day, and the U.S. State Department canceled an award for a Finnish journalist who criticized Trump.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom speaks during a news conference in Berlin on April 10, 2018. (Wolfgang Kumm/Picture Alliance via Getty Images)

Toward a More Feminist Foreign Policy

On the podcast: Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom on how to give women a voice in an arena dominated by men.

Protesters against the veil, protected by young men, march in central Tehran during demonstrations for women's rights on March 10, 1979. (Bettmann Archives/Getty Images)

The Flame of Feminism Is Alive in Iran

While Western activists defend the right of Muslims to wear the veil, Iranian women are fighting for a bigger cause: choice.

First lady Melania Trump honors the International Women of Courage awardees during a ceremony at the State Department in Washington on March 29, 2017. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Cancels Journalist’s Award Over Her Criticism of Trump

Jessikka Aro was to receive a “Women of Courage” prize. Then officials read her Twitter feed.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó speaks to the press in Caracas on Jan. 31. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

Inside the U.S. decision to get behind Congo’s election and how the United States failed Afghan women.

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres. (Luiz Rampelotto/NurPhoto via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Baby Steps Toward a Feminist United Nations

Women’s rights advocates are holding Secretary-General António Guterres accountable.

Hanna Barczyk illustration for Foreign Policy

China’s #MeToo Activists Have Transformed a Generation

A small group of feminists has shifted attitudes—and prompted harsh pushback.

Protesters attend an anti-government demonstration in support of abortion rights in Warsaw on April 9, 2016.

Poland Is Trying to Make Abortion Dangerous, Illegal, and Impossible

Ireland voted to liberalize abortion laws. The far-right government in Warsaw is moving in the opposite direction.

A Nepalese woman prepares to sleep in a chhaupadi hut during her period in Surkhet District, 300 miles west of Kathmandu. Feb. 3, 2017.

In Nepal, Tradition Is Killing Women

The Hindu practice of chhaupadi is dangerous and deadly, but legislation is not enough to stop it.

People celebrate the results of the Irish referendum to overturn the country’s abortion ban in Dublin on May 26, 2018. (Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

A Jury of Peers

How Ireland used a Citizens’ Assembly to solve some of its toughest problems.

A 26-year-old victim of domestic violence poses for pictures in Moscow on Feb. 3, 2017. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

In Russia, Feminist Memes Buy Jail Time, but Domestic Abuse Doesn’t

A year after the country decriminalized domestic violence, women feel the consequences.

Democratic congressional candidate Ilhan Omar speaks to a group of volunteers in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 13, 2018.

Two Muslim Women Are Headed to Congress. Will They Be Heard?

Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib have won, but the battle for a new brand of feminism in the Democratic Party and within Muslim communities has just begun.

Mozambican women and expecting mothers wait to receive medical care at the Murrupelane maternity ward in Nacala, Mozambique, on July 5. (Gianluigi Guercia/ AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Is Erasing Reproductive Rights at Home and Abroad

The removal of information from the State Department’s annual reports has grave consequences for human rights monitoring worldwide.

A photo of Vanessa García when she was 16 with her 27-year-old boyfriend, who used the alias Darío Lulo, during their time with the FARC. Vanessa became pregnant and says she was forced to abort his child. (Erika Piñeros for Foreign Policy)

The Women Abandoned by Peace

Victims of sexual violence and forced abortion during Colombia’s long years of conflict have yet to see justice.

Journalists protest against  sexual harassment in the workplace as part of the #MeToo campaign in New Delhi on Oct. 13. (Mohd Zakir/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)

A 2013 Law Helped Make India’s #MeToo Possible

But will it be enough for the movement to accomplish its goals?

Indian activists shout slogans outside a police station as they demand justice for Bollywood actress Tanushree Dutta, who has accused actor Nana Patekar of sexual harassment, in Mumbai on October 11.

India’s #MeToo Moment Came Late, but It Will Be Transformative

The rage that animated protests against sexual violence in 2012 has returned, and Indian women are fearlessly speaking out against powerful perpetrators.

Activists protest the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh as a Supreme Court judge in Washington on Oct. 5. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Iceland’s Lessons for the #MeToo Era

The history of successful women’s protests show that mass mobilization is key.

Saudi Shiite women hold placards with portraits of prominent Shiite Muslim cleric Nimr al-Nimr on January 2, 2016. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Movie Theaters and Women Driving Won’t Placate Saudi Shiites

Superficial reforms leave religious minorities behind—and that's dangerous.

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