Xi Jinping

Then-Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping and then U.S.-Vice President Joe Biden attend a luncheon in Los Angeles on Feb. 17, 2012.

The United States and China Need to Cooperate—for the Planet’s Sake

Polling shows Americans want Biden to emphasize climate diplomacy with Beijing.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel stands behind Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin during the G20 summit in Osaka on June 28, 2019.

Germany Is Pouring Cold Water on the Biden-Europe Love Fest

Even the arrival of a pro-European U.S. administration can’t paper over unmistakable signs of trans-Atlantic trouble.

Employees on their lunch break at the Dongfeng Honda factory in Wuhan, China, on March 23.

Has China Decided That ‘Moderately Prosperous’ Is Good Enough?

As China’s growth model sputters and Xi Jinping prioritizes repression over reform, China looks unlikely to join the ranks of developed countries.

Street art on a section of the former Berlin Wall shows U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, on April 26 in Berlin.

The Trump State Department’s Swan Song? A Strange, Flawed China Paper.

The U.S.-China conflict may be the defining 21st-century challenge, but the recommendations stand out by what they fail to address.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) summit in Bangkok on Nov. 4, 2019.

Cutting Through the Hype on Asia’s New Trade Deal

The RCEP truly is a China-style trade agreement: platitudinous and ineffective.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017.

Trump’s Flip-Flops on China Are a Danger to National Security

China is a real threat. That requires a serious U.S. strategy, not bellicose rhetoric designed to distract voters from the administration's failures.

Delegates applaud as China's President Xi Jinping walks past during the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 20, 2018.

In Xi’s Little Red Article, the Monotony Is the Point

The Chinese leader’s latest assertion of his absolute power is as tediously dangerous as his thinking.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, shakes hands with China's former President Hu Jintao

China’s Steps Backward Began Under Hu Jintao

Beijing’s new aggression and ideological reaction started well before Xi Jinping.

Beijing magistrates wearing court uniforms join workers demonstrating in support of student hunger-strikers gathered at Tiananmen Square, in Beijing on May 18, 1989.

Xi Jinping’s Tiananmen Family Lessons

The Chinese leader learned one key thing from his father: The party comes first.

A float with a giant portrait of Chinese President Xi Jinping passes by Tiananmen Square during the National Day parade in Beijing on Oct. 1, 2019.

Xi Jinping Is a ‘Good Emperor’

An advocate for China describes why the pandemic has increased his trust in Xi, the party, and Beijing.

Graffiti showing U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping in Berlin on April 26.

Trump Is Dangerously Predictable With China

Whether he is cozying up to China or scapegoating it, Trump has consistently placed his personal political interests over those of the United States.

In Seoul, a South Korean soldier walks past a television screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with Chinese President Xi Jinping in China, on March 28, 2018.

With Kim Jong Un Mysteriously Gone, China Is Likely to Make a Power Move

There are many ways Beijing could use the mystery surrounding Kim Jong Un’s disappearance to its advantage. None of them are good for the United States or Japan.

Foreign Policy illustration

No, the Coronavirus Will Not Change the Global Order

We should be skeptical toward claims that the pandemic changes everything. China won’t benefit, and the United States will remain preeminent.

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