Zimbabwe

A man holds his child inside a malnutrition ward supported by the World Food Programme at Al-Sabeen hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, on Oct. 10.

A U.N. Agency Lauded for Its Work Faces a Funding Shortage

The World Food Program will need more than a Nobel Prize to feed the millions who are newly food-insecure.

ECOWAS mediator and former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan arrives to lead talks with West African envoys and Mali's military junta on Aug. 24 in Bamako, Mali.

The African Union’s Hypocrisy Undermines Its Credibility

The AU’s double standard on lifelong leaders who reject term limits undercuts its moral standing to reject military coups.

A farm worker fertilizes wheat at Ivordale Farm outside Harare, Zimbabwe, on Aug. 1, 2018.

Don’t Give Zimbabwe’s Government Aid Until It Gets Serious About Land Reform

Land reform isn’t just about compensating white farmers whose land was expropriated. It must secure the property rights of Black farmers, too.

Soldiers from the Mozambican army patrol Mocimboa da Praia, Mozambique, on March 7, 2018, following October’s two-day attack by suspected Islamists.

Mozambique’s Insurgency Is a Regional Problem

Rising extremist violence in the country’s oil-rich north threatens stability in southern Africa—and requires a coordinated response.

Kenya Face Shields

If African Governments Won’t Act, the People Will

With frustration rising over haphazard responses to the coronavirus, community networks are filling the void across the continent.

Pregnant women sit as they wait for their turn at a coronavirus testing center

Family Planning Efforts Upended by the Coronavirus

In India and around the world, community health workers are being rerouted to deal with the pandemic—with dangerous results.

Commuters stand in a line to curb the spread of the coronavirus as they proceed to board a ferry at the Likoni ferry terminal in Mombasa, Kenya, on March 27.

Africa Meets Pandemic With Violence, Confusion

The coronavirus arrived late to the continent, but the early responses could backfire.

Flood gates on the Kariba Dam wall between Zimbabwe and Zambia open on Feb. 20, 2015 after the two neighbors signed $294 million in deals with international investors. The overhaul project of the world's largest man-made dam will fix deformities and cracks in walls that were discovered in a series of assessments.

Power Cuts Are Plaguing Southern Africa. The Region Needs Renewable Energy.

Zimbabwe and its richer neighbor South Africa are in the throes of an electricity crisis. Alternative sources of energy are the solution.

Election posters cover a mural of former President Robert Mugabe in Harare, Zimbabwe, on July 30, 2018.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Boris Johnson upends British politics, al Qaeda readies itself for the 18th anniversary of 9/11, and Mugabe is gone, but his legacy is still shaping Zimbabwe.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa pose for a photo with other African leaders on the sidelines of a African Union summit in Addis Ababa on Nov. 17, 2018.

Why Ethiopia Sailed While Zimbabwe Sank

The countries’ leaders both promised change, but only one has delivered.

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe clenches his fist to salute Zanu PF comrades in Harare on May 3, 2000.

Robert Mugabe Colonized His Own Country

He led Zimbabwe to independence—and looted it until the day he died.

Robert Mugabe gives a speech in Harare, Zimbabwe, in March 1980.

Mugabe’s Promise

A transcript of the late leader’s address to the nation on March 4, 1980.

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa shakes hands after addressing a meeting attended by white Zimbabwean farmers and businessmen on July 21, 2018 in Harare.

Economic Isolation is Hindering Zimbabwe’s Transformation

Lifting sanctions and increasing international investment will speed land and security sector reform—and enhance the protection of human rights.

Zimbabwean commercial farmer Rob Smart inspects irrigation pipes for a potato crop at Lesbury Estates farm in Headlands, east of the capital Harare, on Feb. 1, 2018 days after Smart was allowed to return to his land.

Zimbabwe’s New Land Reforms Don’t Go Far Enough

Robert Mugabe seized white-owned farms. Emmerson Mnangagwa is reversing course—but a halfhearted land reform effort won’t solve the country’s economic woes.

Load 10 More Articles