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In Cyberwar, There are No Rules

Why the world desperately needs digital Geneva Conventions.

The scene on the main road of Nawa-i-Barakzai district center in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Aug. 2. The Taliban held the area from October 2016 to July 2017.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Print

The Rise of the Cyber-Mercenaries

What happens when private firms have cyberweapons as powerful as those owned by governments?

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

The cover of Foreign Policy’s Fall 2018 print edition. (C.J. Burton illustration for Foreign Policy)

The Future of War

Introducing Foreign Policy's Fall 2018 print edition.

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Why the Military Must Learn to Love Silicon Valley

The U.S. Defense Department and big tech need each other—but getting along won’t be easy

The scene on the main road of Nawa-i-Barakzai district center in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Aug. 2. The Taliban held the area from October 2016 to July 2017.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Print

The Rise of the Cyber-Mercenaries

What happens when private firms have cyberweapons as powerful as those owned by governments?

Argument

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

The End of the Fighting General 

America’s top brass should abandon dreams of battlefield glory—and focus on paperwork instead.

Argument

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy.

A Million Mistakes a Second 

Ultrafast computing is critical to modern warfare. But it also ensures a lot could go very wrong, very quickly. 

Argument

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

Argument

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

The Algorithms of August

The AI arms race won’t be like previous competitions, and both the United States and China could be left in the dust.

Infographic

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Words of War

Decrypting nine new military programs that will change the face of battle.

Profile

Andrew Marshall at home on Aug. 6. (Lexey Swall for Foreign Policy)

The Return of the Pentagon’s Yoda

Can Andrew Marshall, the U.S. military’s longtime oracle, still predict the future?

Decoder

Susanne Engman illustration for Foreign Policy

Swedes Can’t Go Home Again

In the run-up to Sweden’s election, one word explains why the country used to feel like a family—and why it now feels adrift.

Artifact

The Davy Crockett at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland in March 1961. (Department of Defense)

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

Debunker

Joan Wong illustration for Foreign Policy

Why Growth Can’t Be Green

New data proves you can support capitalism or the environment—but it’s hard to do both.

reviews

Kotryna Zukauskaite illustration for Foreign Policy

Germany’s Return of the Repressed 

The country’s far-right wants to revive ethnic nationalism. The left must come up with its own alternative.

The “Founding Fathers” exhibit at the House of European History highlights key architects of European integration. (Dominique Hommel/European Union 2018 – EP)

Night at the Museum

Brussels’s new European history museum could put anyone to sleep.

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